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Title: The true prophecies or prognostications of Michael Nostradamus, physician to Henry II. Francis II. and Charles IX. Kings of France, and one of the best astronomers that ever were

Author: Nostradamus

Translator: Theophilus Garencières

Release date: September 4, 2022 [eBook #68907]

Language: English

Original publication: United Kingdom: Thomas Ratcliffe and Nathaniel Thompson, 1672

Credits: Curtis Weyant and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at https://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by the Posner Memorial Collection.)

*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE TRUE PROPHECIES OR PROGNOSTICATIONS OF MICHAEL NOSTRADAMUS, PHYSICIAN TO HENRY II. FRANCIS II. AND CHARLES IX. KINGS OF FRANCE, AND ONE OF THE BEST ASTRONOMERS THAT EVER WERE ***
Gallica quem genuit retinetque Britannica tellus
Calluit Hermetis quicquid in arte fuit

THE TRUE
PROPHECIES
OR
PROGNOSTICATIONS
OF
Michael Nostradamus,
PHYSICIAN
TO
Henry II. Francis II. and Charles IX.
KINGS of FRANCE,
And one of the best
ASTRONOMERS that ever were.

A
WORK full of Curiosity and Learning.


Translated and Commented by THEOPHILUS de
GARENCIERES
, Doctor in Physick Colleg. Lond.


LONDON,

Printed by Thomas Ratcliffe, and Nathaniel Thompson, and are to be sold by John Martin, at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-yard, Henry Mortlack at the White Hart in Westminster-Hall, Thomas Collins, at the Middle-Temple Gate, Edward Thomas, at the Adam and Eve in Little Britain, Samuel Lowndes over against Exeter-house in the Strand, Rob. Bolter, against the South door of the Exchange, Jon. Edwin, at the Three Roses in Ludgate-street, Moses Pits at the White Hart in Little Britain, 1672.


To his most Honoured Friend
NATHANIEL PARKER
OF
Grayes-Inne, Esq;
THEOPHILUS de GARENCIERES,
D. Med. Colleg. Lond.
Humbly Dedicateth this Book.

Namque erit ille mihi, &c. Virg. Eccl. I.

TO THE
Courteous Reader.

Reader,

Before thou goest on further to the perusing of this Work, thou art humbly intreated by the Authour, to forgive him his Anglicisme; for being born a Forreigner, and having had no body to help him to the polishing of it, for several reasons, it cannot be expected he should please thine Ears, so much as he may perhaps do thy Fancy. Every Exotick Plant can hardly become Domestical under one or two Generations: Besides that, the Crabbedness of the Original in his own Idiome, can scarce admit a Polite Eloquency in another. The very Antient English Language in this refined Age, is become both obsolete and unintelligible, as we may see in Chaucer, Gower, and others. If you adde to this, that the Authours Nation hath been alwayes famous for its Civility to those that were Strangers to their Language, as not onely to abstain from laughing at them when they spoke amiss, but also in redressing them charitably to the best of their power. I may probably expect you will measure me with the same measure, as you would be if you were in my case.

As for the Errataes of the Press, I could not help them, being out of Town most part of the time that the Book was a Printing; when you meet with any, I hope your Charitable Pen will either mend or obliterate them, and not lay another mans fault upon me, who neither for pride nor ostentation undertook this laborious Work, but that I might give some Satisfaction and Recreation to the Learned and Curious, who have had a longing for it ever since its Birth.

Farewell.


IN
Explicatum à doctissimo sagacissimoq; Viro Domino
De
GARENCIERES
FAMOSI
Nostradami Vaticinium.

Abdita qui medici legit præsagia Vatis,
Non valet hoc quisquam pandere carmen, ait.
Falleris, en Medicus merito quoque nomine Vates,
Invia luminibus permeat antra novis.
Sed minus ingenio tantum mirere laborem
Id succisivo tempore fecit opus.
Petrus Cottereau.

Aliud.

Præteritos in vate tuo cognoscere casus
Vix licet; ast etiam nota futura tibi.
Si potes è mediis lucem proferre tenebris;
Ipsa metallorum semina te-ne latent?
Nulla tuum fugiunt naturæ arcana cerebrum,
Per quem Nostradami Pythica verba patent.
Idem.

Perenni Famæ Doctissimi Viri Theophili de Garencieres Doctoris Medici Colleg. Lond. de Interpretatione NOSTRADAMI Fatidici Tetrastichon hoc dicavit.

Dudleyus, dimidia pars ipsius animæ.

Qvæ primus fecit, facit illa secundus Apollo,
Conjungens medicis oracula sacra triumphis.
Quis major, rogitas? facile est discernere noris
Si Latonigenæ cessare oracula Phœbi.

By the same,
To the Author of this, and a more Excellent Work.

Mystically.

The God of Arts that gives thee Light, as clear
As his, that thou might’st be his Agent here
In all his Secrets; courts thee to go on,
Till thou hast made thy self another Sun.

Æternum vivant si vera Oracula Phœbi
Nostradami vivent; & Patris illa mei;
Petrus.

THE
PREFACE
TO THE
READER.

READER,

Before I speak any thing of the Author, or of his Works, I think it convenient to speak somthing of my self, and of my intention in setting out this Translation, with my Annotations.

The Reputation that this Book hath amongst all the Europeans, since its first coming out, which was in the year 1555. and the curiosity that from time to time the learned have had to see the Mysteries contained in it, unfolded: is a sufficient warrant for my undertaking.

Many better Pens (I confess) could have performed this work with better success, but not with greater facility than I, having from my youth been conversant with those that pretended or endeavered to know somthing in it. Otherwise, it would have been impossible for a man of my profession to wade through it. This Book was the first after my Primmer, wherein I did learn to read, it being then the Custom in France, about the year 1618. to initiate Children by that Book; First, because of the crabbidness of the words; Secondly, that they might be acquainted with the old and absolete French, such as is now used in the English Law; and Thirdly, for the delightfulness and variety of the matter, so that this Book in those days was printed every year like an Almanack, or a Primer for Children. From that time, without any other Study than reading of History, and observing the events of the world, and conversing with those that made it their Study, (some of which were like to run mad about it) I have attained to so much Knowledge, as to bring it into a Volume.

The Book is written in the Nature of Prophecies, digested into old French Verses, most of which are very hard to be understood, and others impossible at all, whether the Author did affect obscurity, or else wanted the faculty to express himself, which is the cause that it could not be rendred into English Verses, it being troublesome enough to be understood in Prose, as the Reader will find. That’s the reason that I have translated it almost word for word, to make it as plain as I could; as also because the Reader (if curious of it) may benefit himself in the knowledge of the French Tongue, by comparing the English and French together. The rest that can be said upon this subject, you shall find either in the Authors Life, or in the Appology made for him.

And because I have told you before, that many have been like to run mad by over-studying these, and other Prophecies, give me leave to give you this advice, that in vain, or at least without any great profit, thou shalt bestow thy time, care, and study upon it: for which I will give thee the chief reasons, that have disswaded me from it.

The first is, that the thing it self, which you may think to understand, is not certain in it self; because the Author disguiseth it in several manners, sometimes speaking a double sense, as that of the ancient Oracle.

Aio te Æacida Romanos vincere posse.

Which is to be understood two ways, and cannot be determinated, till the event of it be past.

It is true, that the Author doth mark so many particular Circumstances, that when the thing is come to pass, every one may clearly see that he pretended to Prophecie that particular thing. And besides he doth sometimes deliver the thing in so obscure terms, that without a peculiar Genius, it is almost impossible to understand it.

The second is, that though the Prophecie be true in it self, yet no body knoweth, neither the time, nor how: For example, he plainly foretelleth, that the Parliament of England should put their King to death; nevertheless no body could tell, nor when, nor how, till the thing was come to pass, nor what King it should be, till we had seen it.

The third is, that he marketh the times with Astrological terms, viz. when such and such Planets, shall be in such and such Signs; but as those Planets are often here, and go out of it, and come there again, no certain judgement can be made of it.

The fourth is, that many times he giveth some peculiar Circumstances to those he speaketh of, which may be found in others. Thus the Royal first born might have been applied to Lewis the XIII. to Lewis the XIV. to the first born of Philip the II. and Philip the III. King of Spain, and to Kings of England, Father and Son. Nevertheless we find that this word Royal first born, was intended for Henry IV. Grandfather on his Mothers side, as we shall shew hereafter. This being so, it cannot be expounded, but after the event.

The fifth is, that the knowledge of future things, belongeth to God alone, and no body can pretend by any study, to have a certain acquisition of it in all its Circumstances.

The sixth is, that the orders of Gods providence, which cause the several events in all States, will not permit that men should have a publick notion of his designs, sometimes he revealeth them to his Servants, or to some particular man as he pleaseth, but he will not have them to be known among the common sort of men.

The seventh, is the experience we have had of many, who pretending to understand the Author, have made a quantity of false Prophecies, expounding the Stanza’s according to their fancy, as if God had given them the same understanding that he gave the Author, and what ought to confirm us more in this point, is, that they have expounded some Prophecies, as if they were to come to pass, which were past already, by which we see the darkness of humane wit, who without authority pretendeth to bite into the forbidden fruit of knowledge.

The eighth is, that this knowledge is no way profitable for the Vulgar; because those things being decreed by God, they shall come to pass without forceing our liberty, nor hindering the contingency of sublunary things, where we must observe that the Prophecies which were revealed to men, are many times conditional, as we see in that of Jonas against Ninive, but those that they have left in writing for the times that should come after them, are absolutely true, and shall infallibly come to pass, as they have foretold them. This no ways hindereth, but God may reveal some secrets of his to private men, for their benefit, and that of their friends, without imparting it to the Vulgar, who may be, should laugh at them.

The ninth is, that God hath peculiarly reserved to himself the knowledge of times. Daniel, by a special favour, knew the end of the Babylonian Captivity, and the time of the Messiah’s birth, and yet the interpreters can scarce yet expound clearly the meaning of the seventy weeks of Daniel, and we see, that since 1600 years ago, holy men, from age to age, have foretold the proximity of Dooms-day, and the coming of Antichrist.

The tenth is, that the foretelling of future things in this Author, is for the most part included in business of State, and one might be guilty of a criminal temerity, if he would discover things that concern us not, and the concealing of which, is commended by all prudent persons, seeing that we owe respect, love, and submission to those that bear rule over us.

For these reasons (dear Reader) I would not have thee intangle thy self in the pretentions of knowing future things. If you have light concerning them, keep thine own secret, and make use of it for thy self: Preserve peace, and let the Almighty govern the World: for he can turn all things to his Glory, and may when he pleaseth, raise up some Wits that will make known unto us, what we desire, without any further trouble to our selves. Before I make an end, I cannot but acquaint thee for gratitude sake, of my Obligation to several persons, which have lent me Books, to help me towards the finishing of this work, as namely that worthy Gentleman, and the Honour of his profession Mr. Francis Bernard, Apothecary to St. Bartholemews Hospital, and Mr. Philip Auberton Gentleman, belonging to the Right Honourable the Earl of Bridgwater. Farewell.


THE
LIFE
OF
Michael Nostradamus,
Physitian in Ordinary to HENRY the II. and
CHARLES the IX. Kings of France.

Michael Nostradamus, the most renowned and famous Astrologer, that hath been these many Ages, was born in St. Remy, a Town of Provence, in the year 1503. upon a Thursday, the 14th of December, about noon. His father was James Nostradamus, a Notary of the said Town, his Mother was Renata of St. Remy, whose Grandfathers by the Fathers and Mothers side, were men very skilfull, in Mathematick and Physick, one having been Physitian to Renatus, King of Jerusalem, and Sicily, and Earl of Provence, and the other Physition to John, Duke of Calabria, Son to the said Renatus, whence cometh that our Author saith in his Commentaries, that he hath received from hand to hand the Knowledge of Mathematicks, from his ancient Progenitors. After the death of his great Grandfather by the Mothers side, who first gave him a slight tincture, and made him in love with the Mathematicks, he was sent to School to Avignon. After that he went to Mount Pelier, to study Philosophy and Physick, till a great Plague coming, he was compelled to go to Narbonne, Thoulouse, and Bourdeaux, where he first began to practise, being then about 22 years of age. Having lived four years in those parts, he went back again to Monpelier, to get his degrees, which he did with a great deal of applause. Going to Thoulouse, he past through Agen, where Julius Cæsar Scaliger stayed him, with whom he was very familiar and intimately acquainted, though they fell out afterward; there he took to wife a very honourable Gentlewoman, by whom he had two Children, a Son and a Daughter, all which being dead, and seeing himself alone, he resolved to retire himself into Provence his Native Countrey. After he had gone to Marseille, he went to Aix, where the Parliament of Provence sitteth, and was there kept three years at the City Charges; because of the violent Plague that raged then in the year 1546. as you may read in the Lord of Launay’s Book, called the Theater of the World, who describeth that Plague according to the informations our Author gave him. Thence he went to Salon de Craux, a City distant from Aix one dayes Journey, and in the middle way between Avignon and Marseille; there he Married his second Wife Anna Ponce Genelle, by whom he had three Sons and one Daughter, the eldest was Michael Nostradamus, who hath written some pieces of Astrology, Printed at Paris in the year 1563.

The second was Cæsar Nostradamus, who hath deserved to be numbred among the French Historians, by reason of the great Volume he hath written of Provence.

The third was a Capuchine Frier. Cæsar did insert in his History the propagation of that Order in Provence. The fourth was a Daughter.

Nostradamus having found by experience that the perfect knowledge of Physick dependeth from that of Astrology, he addicted himself to it, and as this Science wanteth no allurement, and that besides his Genius he had a peculiar disposition and inclination to it; he made such a progress in it, that he hath deserved the Title of the most illustrious one in France, insomuch that making some Almanacks for recreation sake, he did so admirably hit the conjuncture of events, that he was sought for far and near.

This success was the cause of an extraordinary diminution of his fame; for the Printers and Booksellers seeing his fame, did print and vent abundance of false Almanacks under his name for lucre sake, whence it came that his reputation suffered by it, and was the cause that the Lord Pavillon wrote against him, and that the Poet Jodele made this bitter Distichon.

Nostra damus cum falsa damus, nam fallere nostrum est,
Et cum falsa damus, nil nisi Nostra damus.

To which may be answered.

Nostra damus cum verba damus quæ Nostradamus dat,
Nam quæcunque dedit nil nisi vera dedit.

Or thus

Vera damus cum verba damus quæ Nostradamus dat,
Sed cum Nostra damus, nil nisi falsa damus.

Nevertheless the Beams of Truth did shine through the Clouds of Calumny; for he was singularly esteemed of by the Grandees, Queen Katharine of Medicis, who had a natural inclination to know future things.

And Henry the II. King of France, who sent for him to come to the Court in the year 1556. and having had private conference with him about things of great concernment, sent him honourably back again with many gifts. He went from Salon to the Court upon the 14 of July in the year 1555. and came to Paris upon the 15 of August. As soon as he was come to Town, the Lord Constable of Montmorency went to see him at his Inn, and presented him to the King, who received him with much satisfaction, and commanded that his lodging should be at the Palace of the Cardinal of Bourbon Archbishop of Sens.

There he was taken with the Gout for ten or twelve days, after which his Majesty sent him one hundred Crowns in Gold in a Velvet Purse, and the Queen as much. Their Majesties desired him to go to Blois to see the Princes their Children, and to tell them his opinion of them. It is certain that he did not tell them what he thought, considering the Tragical end of those three Princes, viz. Francis the II. Charles the IX. and Henry the III.

Having been so much honoured at Court, he went back again to Salon, where he made an end of his last Centuries, two years after he dedicated them to the King Henry the II. in the year 1557. and in his Luminary Epistle discovereth unto him the future events that shall happen from the Birth of Lewis the XIV. now Reigning, till the coming of Antichrist.

While he was at Salon he received there the Duke of Savoy, and the Lady Margaret of France, Sister to Henry the II. who was to Marry the said Duke according to the treaty of the general Peace made at Cambresis, both entertained him very familiarly, and honoured him often with their presence. The Duke came in October and the Lady in December.

When Charles the IX. went a progress through his Kingdom, he came into Provence, and did fail not to go to Salon to visit our Author, who in the name of the Town went to salute him, and make a Speech, this was in the year 1564. the 17 of November.

The extraordinary satisfaction that the King and the Queen Mother received from him was such, that being both at Lion, they sent for him again, and the King gave him 200 Crowns in Gold, and the Queen almost as much, with the quality of Physician in Ordinary to the King, with the Salaries and profits thereunto appertaining. Being come back to Salon he lived about 16 Months longer, and died upon the 2 of July 1566. in his Climacterical year of 63. having all his senses about him: His Disease was a Gout at first, which turned into a Dropsie; the time of his death it seemeth was known to him; for a friend of his witnesseth, that at the end of June in the said year he had writen with his own hand upon the Ephemerides of John Stavius these Latine words, Hic prope mors est; that is, near here is my death, and the day before his death that friend of his having waited on him till very late took his leave, saying, I shall see you again to morrow morning, you shall not see me alive when the Sun riseth, which proved true. He died a Roman Catholick, having received all his Sacraments, and was solemnly buried in the Church of the Franciscan Friers at Salon, on the left hand of the Church door, where his Widow erected him a Marble Table fastened in the Wall with this Epitaph, with his Figure to the Life, and his Arms above it.

The Inscription of his EPITAPH is in imitation of that of Titus Livius, and is thus.

D. M.

Ossa clarissimi Michaelis Nostradami, unius omnium pene mortalium digni, cujus Divino calamo totius Orbis ex astrorum influxu futuri eventus conscriberentur. Vixit annos LXII. menses VI. dies X. Obiit. Salonæ CIↃ IↃLXVI. Anna Pontia Gemella, conjugi optimo. V. E.

Which may be rendred thus:

Here lies the Bones of the most famous Nostradamus, one who among Men hath deserved by the opinion of all, to set down in writting with a Quill almost Divine, the future Events of all the Universe, caused by the Cœlestial influences; he lived 62. years 6. Months and 10. days, he died at Salon, in the year 1566.

O Posterity do not grudge at his rest.

Anna Pontia Gemella wisheth to her most loving Husband the true Happiness.

He had a Brother named John Nostradamus, famous for several Works that he hath written, the Catalogue of which is in the Book of Mr. du Maine de la Croix, Intitled, the Library.

As for our Author, he hath left several Works, among which is a Book of Receits, for the preservation of health, Printed at Poitiers, in the year 1556.

Another concerning the means of beautifying the Face and the Body, that was Printed at Antwerp by Plantin in the year 1557. which he Dedicated to his Brother John Nostradamus, an Attorney at the Parliament of Aix.

Besides this, he Translated from Latine into French the Paraphases of Galen, upon the Exhortation of Menedotus, which was Printed at Lyon by Antony du Rhosne, in the year 1557.

But before we conclude, it will not be amiss to give some recreation to the Reader, by relating a merry passage that happened to Nostradamus being in Lorrain, for being in the Castle of Faim, belonging to the Lord of Florinville, and having in cure the Mother of the said Lord; it chanced one day that they both walking in the Yard, there was two little Piggs, one white, and the other black, whereupon the Lord enquired of Nostradamus in jest, what should become of these two Piggs? he answered presently, we shall eat the black, and the Wolf shall eat the white.

The Lord Florinville intending to make him a Lyar, did secretly command the Cook to dress the white for Supper; the Cook then killed the white, drest it, and spitted it ready to be rosted when it should be time; In the mean time having some business out of the Kitchin, a young tame Wolf came in, and eat up the Buttocks of the white Pig, that was ready to be rosted; the Cook coming in the mean time, and fearing least his Master should be angry, took the black one, killed it, and drest it, and offered it at Supper. Then the Lord thinking he had got the Victory, not knowing what was befallen, said to Nostradamus, well Sir, we are eating now the white Pigg, and the Wolf shall not touch it. I do not believe it (said Nostradamus) it is the black one that is upon the Table. Presently the Cook was sent for, who confessed the accident, the relation of which was as pleasing to them as any meat.

In the same Castle of Faim, he told many that in a little Hill that was near the Castle, there was a Treasure hidden, which should never be found, if it were sought with design, but that it should be discovered when the Hill should be digged for some other intent. There is a great probability in this prediction, for there was an ancient Temple built upon it, and when they dig there, many times several Antiquities are found. All France telleth several Histories foretold by the Author, but I am unwilling to write any thing without good warrant. His Stanza’s are sufficient to prove the extraordinary Talent he had in foretelling future things.


APOLOGY
FOR
Michael Nostradamus.

CHAP. I.

It is not unusual for Calumny to follow the best Wits, and those whom God hath endowed with so extraordinary Talent, upon weak and slight grounds. It is not also unusual for Men to side easier with calumny against innocent persons, then with those truths that justifie them; therefore no body ought to wonder, if Michael Nostradamus hath been so much cried down and defamed by several Authors, being in the number of those extraordinary persons, whom God had priviledged with that grace so much desired by curious Men, viz. the knowledge of future events.

Besides that, there was four things in him, which might have been the grounds of this diffamation.

The first was the vulgar life which he led in the Roman Catholik Religion, which seemed to bear no proportion with such an extraordinary favour of God.

The second was his application to judicial Astrology, which is condemned by many learned Men, and detested by those that pretend to ignorant devotion.

The third was a suspition brought by his enemies, and many devout persons in his time, that he was a Negromancer, and had familiarity with the Angel of darkness.

The fourth was the obscurity of his Stanza’s, which was made worse by the enormous faults of those that first Copied them, and by the carelesness of the Printers.

CHAP. II.
How the first Objection hath caused the Author to be reputed a false Prophet.

In consequence of the first Objection, calumny hath endeavoured to place him among the false Prophets, because scarce any body can persuade himself, that there being among the Faithful so many Illustrious persons in Holiness and Learning, the Holy Ghost would have made choice of a common person, and to reveal him so many rare secrets, concerning the future Estate of his Church, and of those Kingdoms that acknowledge her for their Mother, seeing that the Holy Scriptures shew us, that the knowledge of future things (chiefly if it be extraordinary in its extent) is a special Priviledge wherewith God honoureth his most faithful Servants.

And to say truth, when the Holy Fathers and the Interpreters of the Scripture speak of the Prerogatives of the Apostle St. John, they make the chiefest to be that by which being full of Prophetical Spirit, he foretold the future Estate of the Church; and in the Old Testament, so many Prophets were so many Miracles and Prodigies of Holiness, and the only name of Prophet in the Scripture is the most glorious Title that is given to those that were Gods most faithful Servants.

If we find in the Scripture that Balaam hath Prophesied notwithstanding his perfidiousness, and that the High Priest Caiaphas, notwithstanding his wicked design of murdering Christ, hath also Prophesied; it was only for a few things, and in such cases where God would singularly shew forth his Glory, by those that would have smothered it.

How can we then believe the same of Nostradamus, who had not so much as an extraordinary atom of Christian piety, by which he might have been so much priviledg’d of God, as to know by his Divine Light the future Estate of the Church, her Persecutions and her Victories from the year 1555. to the end of the World.

Can it be possible that a Physician, an Astrologer, and one of the common sort of people should have been chosen of God among so many thousands his betters, to impart unto him those Graces, which have been the reward of the purity and holiness of his Apostles, and of the faithfulness of St. John the Evangelist.

This seemeth altogether improbable to Christian piety.

CHAP. III.
The second Objection hath ranked the Author among Dreamers and false Visionaries.

Some are more moderate in the censuring of this Author, and being unwilling to call him maliciously a false Prophet, would have him to be a foolish Dreamer, who believed his own imaginations, and took pleasure in his own fancies, whence came that Latine Distick of the Poet Jodelle,

Nostra damus cum falsa damus, nam fallere nostrum est,
Et cum falsa damus, nil nisi Nostra damus.

This Distick was so pleasing to the Wits of the times, that without further inquiry, since that time Nostradamus went for a Dreamer and a doting fool.

This opinion increased more and more by his making of many Almanacks, wherein every body may see how much he was taken with judicial Astrology; and we see often in his Stanza’s the decision of the times, by the conjunction of the Planets with the Signs, and by the Eclipses, whence sometimes he doth infer some events that were to happen.

But what did undo him most, was the covetousness of the Printers and Booksellers of his time, who seeing his Almanacks so well received, did set forth a thousand others under his name, that were full of lies and fopperies.

From that time the Author went for one of those poor Astrologers, who get their living by foretelling absurdities; and pretend to read in the Heavens, that which is only in their foolish imagination.

CHAP. IV.
The third Objection accuseth the Author of medling with the black Art, of being a Negromancer, and a Disciple of the Devil.

If the precedents have been moderate in their censure; others have been more severe in delivering their opinion, accusing him to have kept acquaintance with the Devil, as the Negromancers and other Prestigiators of the ancient times did.

The reason that made them think so is, that seeing so many things come to pass, just as the Author had foretold; they could not attribute it to the knowledge of judicial Astrology, nor to Divine Revelation, and consequently concluded, that it must of necessity come from Satan.

They could not attribute it to judicial Astrology, either because they had no opinion of it, or that the greatest defensors of that Astrology do agree among themselves, that it cannot reach so far as to foretell a thousand peculiar circumstances, which depend purely from the freedom of Men, such as proper names are, and the like, which nevertheless our Author did foretell.

They could neither attribute it to Divine Revelation, for the reasons alledged in the first objection; moreover, because he was accused of a thousand falsities and fopperies, Printed in those Almanacks that went falsly under his name, whence they concluded that it could not come by Divine Revelation, seeing that the Holy Ghost is the Spirit of Truth.

It followeth then (say they) that it must come from the Devil, by the help of the Black Art; the Lord Florimond de Raimond a very considerable Author, was of that opinion in his Book of the Birth of Heresies, Chap. 3.

CHAP. V.
The fourth Objection maketh him the Head of those Seductors and Impostors, which are dangerous in a Common-wealth.

As Fame doth increase by continuation of time, so doth calumny increase by the multiplicity of opinions, she was not contented to deflour slightly the Authors reputation, by making him pass for some sottish Dreamer, and to rank him amongst the false Prophets, by accusing him to meddle with the black Art, but must needs also sacrifice him to the infernal Furies, by making him the Prince of Seductors and Impostors, that ought to be banished out of every Common-wealth. The fondamental reason of this was the obscurity of his Stanza’s, where there was neither rime nor reason; the obscurity did proceed of abundance of gross faults, which the Copisters and Printers have inserted in them, from the omission of several words, from the changing and altering of others, and from the addition of some others, which did destroy the sense.

From this great obscurity, calumny draweth this argument, to ruine utterly the Author, charging him to be all at once a false Prophet, a dotish Dreamer, a Magician, and an infamous Seductor of people.

If God had inspired him what he hath written, he would have done it for the good of his Church and true Believers, seeing he never granteth this Prophetical Grace to any, but to that end as it appeareth in the Holy Scriptures.

This being so, what profit can any body draw from him, if the sense of his Stanza’s be so obscure, as not to be understood? and although it should be granted, that some accidents that have happened in Christendom, may sometimes be found in his Prophecies, what fruit hath the Church reaped of it, seeing that those accidents that were foretold, were never known, till they had come to pass, and that there was no avoiding of them?

It cannot therefore be believed, that God should have been the Author of his Predictions, but rather the Subtle Spirit of Satan, with whom he was acquainted by such like black Arts.

According to those four Objections, the Lord Sponde in the third Volume of his Annals, made him this Epitaph in the year 1566. Mortuus est hoc anno nugax ille toto orbe famosus Michael Nostradamus, qui se præscium & præsagum eventuum futurorum per astrorum influxum venditavit, sub cujus deinceps nomine quivis homines ingeniosi suas hujusmodi cogitationes protendere consueveruent, in quem valde apposite lusit qui dixit. Nostra damus cum falsa damus, &c. In English. In the year 1566. died that Trifler so famous through all the World, Michael Nostradamus who boasted while he lived, to know and foretell future things, by the knowledge he had of the influences of the Planets, under whose name afterwards many ingenious Men have vented their Imaginations, insomuch, that he that made that Distick, Nostra damus cum falsa damus, &c. seemeth to have very well said.

CHAP. VI.
Proofs setting forth evidently that Nostradamus was enlightned by the Holy Ghost.

In consequence of these objections forged by calumny, Nostradamus name hath been so cried down, that I have thought me self oblidged to make his Apology, to give the greater credit to his Prophecy, the exposition of which I do here undertake, and to proove, that effectually he was enlightned by the Holy Ghost: first, by writting the History of his Life, as I have done in the beginning of this Book; Secondly, by answering to all the said Objections; Thirdly, by alledging the Elogies given him by several Grave and Authentical Authors.

First, I maintain that he was enlightned by the Holy Ghost, by an unanswerable reason, drawn out the Theology, but before we discourse of it, let us suppose that Nostradamus hath foretold many things, which absolutely depends from the free will of men, and cannot be known, neither by judicial Astrology, nor by Satan himself, such are for exemple the proper names of Persons, which nevertheless he doth in his Prophecies.

He nameth the Lord of Monluc, the Sprightful Gascon, the Captain Charry, his Camerade, the Lord de la Mole, Admiral of Henry the II. Galleys, Entragues, who was beheaded by order of Lewis the XIII. the Headsman of the Duke of Montmorency, named Clerepegne; the Bassa Sinan, destroyer of Hungary; the Murderer of Henry the III. named Clement; the Attorney David, the Captain Ampus; the Mayor of the City of Puy in Gelay, named Rousseau, under Henry the IV. Lewis Prince of Condé, under Francis II. Sixtus V. calling him the Son of Hamont; Gabrielle d’Estrée; the Lord Mutonis sent to Paris by those of Aix, under Charles the IX. the Lord Chancellor of France, named Antony de Sourdis; the Queen Leuise: Antony of Portugal: the Governour of Cazal under Henry II.

Secondly, The number of things is of the same nature: Nostradamus doth often calculate it; he reckoneth fourteen Confederates for the service of Henry IV. in the City of Puy: ten great Ships prosecuting extreamly the Admiral in the Battle of Lepanto: five Ships taken from the Spaniard by those of Diepe, under Henry II. nine hundred thousands Mores that went out of Spain under Henry IV. three hundred and fifty thousands killed under Charles IX. and Henry III. three saved at the taking of a Town in Hungary by the Turks: nine separated from the company of Seditious, that were to be put to death, three Princes of Turky Massacred, and the fourth being the youngest saved; thirty Conspirators upon London Bridge, against the Majesty of King Charles I. and such like.

Thirdly, We find in these Prophecies, the Prodigies that have no other causes in nature, then the meer will of God; such as Comets are, the casting of monstrous Fishes by the Sea upon the Land, the Armies in the Air, the speaking of Dogs, the birth of Monsters, and such like.

Fourthly, We find in those Prophecies those actions that are purely indifferent; for example, that the King of England did appear upon a Scaffold without his Doublet; that in the place where he was beheaded, another man had been killed three days before; that Libertat went a Hunting with a Greyhond, and a Blood-hond; that the two little Royals were conducted to St. Germain, rather then to any other place, and such like.

Fifthly, We find the Birth of several particular persons that were born after his death.

Sixthly, The Governments of Places given by the free will of Kings to such and such.

All these things cannot be known by judicial Astrology, seeing that in Heaven there is neither Names, nor Numbers, nor extraordinary Prodigies: seeing also that judicial Astrology presupposeth the Birth of persons, that one may foretel their future actions; the same things are also unknown to Satan, for the Angelical species know nothing of individual things, but under the notion of possible, and not of future.

Whence I conclude with this irrefragable Argument, that the Author hath known many several things that are not written in the Heavenly Book, nor represented to him by Angelical Species, therefore he hath known them from God himself.

The Author himself in his Epistle to his Son Cæsar Nostradamus confesseth, that he hath foretold many things by Divine Virtue and Inspiration.

And a little after he saith, that the knowledge of those things, which meerly depends from free will, cannot be had either by humane auguries, nor by any other humane knowledge, nor by any secret virtue that belongeth to sublunary things, but only by a Light, belonging to the Order of Eternity.

This is not a small Argument, to confirm what we have said, and to prove that the Author hath evidently been conscious, that his knowledge came from Heaven, and that Gods goodness did him that grace; for having rejected and abhorred other means, that Impostors make use of for foretelling something.

He writteth all these things of himself: First, in his Liminary Epistle to his Son Cæsar, he conjureth him, that when he should go about to study the foretelling of future things by Astrology, to avoid all kind of Magick, prohibited by the Holy Scripture, and the Canons of the Church; and to encourage him the more to it, he relateth what happened to him, viz. that having been Divinely enlightned, and fully persuaded that God only can give the knowledge of future things, which absolutely depends of the free will of men, he did burn abundance of Writings, wherein was taught the Art of Prophecying, and as they were a burning, there came out a great flame, which was like (he thought) to burn his House all to ashes, by which accident he understood the falsity of such Writings, and that the Devil was vexed to see his plots discovered; besides that, he confesseth that being the greatest Sinner of the World, nevertheless he got that favour from Heaven by a Divine Inspiration; and because no body should doubt of it, he learnedly expoundeth wherein consisteth that inspired Revelation, he saith that it is, A participation of the Eternal Divinity, by which we come to judge of what the Holy Ghost imparteth to us; by that participation of Eternity, the Author doth not understand a communication of the continuance of the Divine being, but a participation of the Divine knowledge, measured by its Eternity, as the Schools terms it.

Effectively, the Author compareth this participation to a glistering flame, which createth a new day in our understanding, which flame proceeding from Gods infinite knowledge, who seeth and comprehendeth what is Eternity, doth impart unto us what is inclosed in the volubility of the Heavens.

After this testimony, which wholly destroyeth the Sinister opinions that men had of his Prophecies, he sheweth how Judicial Astrology may agree with the knowledge of that which proceedeth from a Prophetical Spirit.

It is true, saith he, that sometimes God imparteth this Light not only to the unlearned, and to his Holy Prophets, but also to those that are versed in Judicial Astrology, making that instrumental for the confirmation of his inspired truths: As we see that natural Sciences, help the light of the Faith, and make a certain disposition in the mind fitter then ordinary, to receive those Divine impressions.

Thus (saith he) in the beginning of the Epistle, God did supernaturaly inspire me, not by any Bacchick fury, nor by Lymphatical motions, as he did the Sybilles; but by Astronomical assertions; that is to say, that God gave him that grace, not by any Extasy, but by studying those rules, which Astrology teacheth.

The same things he saith again a little after in this manner: the Astrologer being in his Study, and consulting the Astronomical Rules upon the motions of the Heavens, the Conjunction and several Aspects of the Planets, he guesseth at some future events, of which being not certain, this Divine Light riseth in his mind, and imparteth clearly to him what he knew before, only Ænigmatically and obscurely, and in the shade of that natural light.

Sometimes also (saith he) this Light cometh the first into the Astrologers mind, and he afterwards comparing the thing revealed unto him with the Astronomical rules, he seeth that they do wholly agree together; and this is the method that he hath made use of, to know whether the inspired truths were agreeing with the Astronomical Calculations; a method that he hath made use of some times, but not always, for he hath foretold many things, which he could not read in the Heavens.

By these testimonies of the Author himself, every one may see how he made use of Judicial Astrology, and wherefore he studied it so much; how far his knowledge did extend; the glory he giveth to God alone, for his Prophetical knowledge; what horrour he hath always had against unlawful means to attain unto it; how much he did value that Grace, considering his unworthiness; and the manner how the Lord was pleased to gratifie him.

CHAP. VII.
Answer to the first Objection against Nostradamus, which pretendeth to rank him among the false Prophets.

Let us see now what calumny pretendeth for the obscuring this Prophet of our days; the knowledge of future things (saith she) is a priviledge belonging to the Saints, and to those whom God hath endowed with an eminent vertue. I acknowledge, it is so commonly, and in the ordinary way of Grace, but if God be pleased to impart that priviledge to those that have not attained to that Degree of Holiness, and that it really appeareth by the reasons of Theologie, that they have been gratified with it, we are bound to admire his Royal bounty, which giveth when, and to whom he pleaseth: for example, no body deserveth to be a Marshal of France, but he that hath been in several Battles, and at the taking of many Towns; but if the King be pleased to honour with that Dignity a Gentleman that never Warred but against the Deer, the Kings goodness is to be praised, which extendeth even to those that have not deserved it; it is the same reason here, it is visibly apparent that Nostradamus hath been enlightned by the Holy Ghost, and yet he hath not imitated the lifes of those great Saints of the Church: what can be inferred from thence, but that it was Gods pleasure to extend his bounty upon his poor Creatures, which is easie to be granted in this point, because the gift of Prophecy is not a sanctifying Grace, but a supernatural gift, of which a sinner is capable of, as we see in Balaam, Caiaphas, and the Sybilles, and much more in a Christian, who observeth Gods Commandments, and endeavoureth to keep himself in his Grace.

But (saith calumny) Christian piety seemeth to be repugnant to this Divine disposition, seeing that in Nostradamus time, there were thousands in the Church of God that were capable of this favour, and to prefer to them a Physitian, an Astrologer, and an Almanack-maker, is a thing that the Wits cannot apprehend so well, as to frame a good opinion for this Author.

Hold there Reader, do not enter into the Sanctuary of Gods secret Judgements, you should loose you self, and never find the way out: how many such questions might I ask you? why did God in former times chuse the Family and person of David, and preferred it to so many others of the Children of Israel? why did Christ raise Judas to the dignity of an Apostle, preferring him before Nathaniel, and so many others that lived Holily.

Bring therefore no more such questions, but say with the Scripture, As it pleased the Lord, so it was done: I will nevertheless give you some satisfaction in that point. There was two things in the Author which might have procured that blessing from God.

The first is, that having in his possession those writtings which promised the knowledge of future things, to which he was much inclined, he slighted and burnt them, being persuaded that God alone was the Author of this Grace; I do esteem that action very Heroical in its circumstance, because being inticed by a vehement curiosity to know future things, and having in his hand the means that opened the way to it, he did Sacrifice them to God, for which perhaps God was willing to gratifie him with this favour.

The second thing that was in Nostradamus is, that he had naturally a Genius for the knowing of future things, as himself confesseth in two Epistles to King Henry the II. and to Cæsar his own Son, and besides that Genius, the knowledge of Astrology, did smooth him the way to discover many future events. Having those two things, he had a greater disposition then others to receive those Supernatural Lights; and as God is pleased to work sweetly in his Creatures, and to give some forerunning dispositions to those Graces he intendeth to bestow, it seemeth that to that purpose he did chuse our Author to reveal him so many wonderful secrets.

We see every day that God in the distributing of his Graces carrieth himself towards us, according to our humours and natural inclinations, he employeth those that have a generous and Martial heart for the defence of his Church, and the destruction of Tyrants; he leadeth those of a melancholick humour into Colledges and Cloisters, and cherisheth tenderly, those that are of meek and mild disposition; even so, seeing Nostradamus inclined to this kind of knowledge, he gave him in a great measure the grace of it.

CHAP. VIII.
Answer to the second Objection, which would have him pass for a Doctor.

We shall not have much to say to these more moderate persons, seeing that we have already given the reason of it, viz. the covetousness of the Booksellers and Printers, who made use of the Authors name, for the better sale of their false Almanacks, therefore if Jodelle the Poet grounded upon this opinion, made that Satyrical Distick.

Nostra damus cum falsa damus, nam fallere nostrum est,
Et cum falsa damus, nil nisi Nostra damus.

We answer him,

Nostra damus cum verba damus quæ Nostradamus dat,
Nam quæcunque dedit nil nisi vera dedit.

Or thus

Vera damus cum verba damus quæ Nostradamus dat,
Sed cum Nostra damus, nil nisi falsa damus.

CHAP. IX.
Answer to the third Objection, which accuseth him of the Black Art, and of Negromancy.

The more doth Calumny lift up her self against this great man, the weaker are her arguments, like the smoke which is so much the easier dissipated, as it ascendeth higher.

Her reason is impertinent in this distributive argument, he hath known those things (saith she) which he could not know by the Planets, and he had them not from God, therefore he had them from Satan.

And we answer this argument in the same way, he hath known those things which he could not know by the Planets, nor by Satan, therefore he had them from God; this Argument is concluding, but that of calumny halteth, for it ought to have proved that he had not his knowledge from God, and that all those things he hath known may be known to Satan, which two things we have manifestly proved to be false, therefore if the Lord Florimond de Raimond was alive, I believe he would correct what he hath written against him.

CHAP. X.
Answer to the fourth Objection, of Calumny, which brandeth our Author with the title of Chief of the Seductors and Impostors.

The Weapons of this Medusa are sharper in this point then in others, therefore our Buckler accordingly must be of the best mettle and temper.

We cannot deny but Nostradamus hath affected obscurity, himself acknowledgeth it in his two Epistles, in that to Cæsar his son, he saith, he hath done it, not only because of the times wherein he lived, but also by reason of those that were to follow, in the times wherein he lived the Case was as it is now, Veritas odium parit, and this hatred in powerful men is prejudicial to those that speak the Truth, he was also cautious in that, by reason of the times following; for if he had plainly declared what he meant, the Wits would have laughed at it, and would not have believed those strange revolutions that came to pass, and which our Author had foretold. In his Epistle to Henry the II he telleth him, that he doth purposely make use of obscure terms to express his mind, for the reasons before alledged.

Now Calumny saith, that this affectation of obscurity is a sign that God was not the Author of his Knowledge, seeing that by this obscurity they have proved unprofitable to the Church.

I answer first, that the consequence is false; for the Holy Prophets have spoken so obscurely, that a great part of what they had Prophecied was not known till after it had come to pass.

I answer secondly, that although Prophecies were not understood till after the fulfilling thereof, it doth not follow that they were unprofitable; because by their fulfilling in due time, we gather, that he who revealed them was the true God, Lord of times and Eternity, and therefore being the God of Israel, and of the Christians, he ought to be worshiped. By this principle Cyrus and Alexander knew the true God, Cyrus by having seen the Prophecies of Isaiah, and Alexander those of Daniel.

Therefore as the Prophecies of the Saints have not been fruitless, though not understood till they were fulfilled, even so we must not infer that Nostradamus’s Prophecies have been useless, though they have remained in obscurity so long a while.

Besides, there is no doubt but Nostradamus having Prophecied so many several things that are come to pass, but that hereafter when the Heathen shall see it they shall glorifie God, and shall acknowledge a true Religion, as did Cyrus, who many Authors believe to have obtained Salvation.

I answer in the third place, that God permitteth ordinarily that Prophecies lie long in the dark, and then raiseth the Spirit of some men to expound them, as he did that of Daniel to interpret the 70 Weeks of the Babylonian Captivity, Prophecied by Jeremiah, to incourage the faithful three ways.

First, in shewing them, that if the first Prophecies have been punctually fulfilled, the rest will likewise come to pass, seeing the same God hath dictated them.

Secondly, in unfolding to them the future wonders, of which they shall be partakers.

Thirdly, in giving warning how they may attain to them, and shew those accidents that might be an hindrance. Thus God did permit, that for the space of 100. years Nostradamus Prophecies should lie in darkness, and be contemned, but after that time God will raise some body to interpret them, whence the faithful seeing so many things foretold come to pass so exactly, will incourage one another by seing so many wonderful prodigies, of whom they shall be Eye Witnesses.

As for my part I have undertaken this Work, only to authorise the wonders that shall be seen in our days, and to invite the Christian Princes to the same design.

The conclusion of this discourse is, that our Medusa Calumny, must needs retreat in her dens, and that we ought to forgive those Authors that have spoken so ill of our Author, seing they wanted the Intelligence of his Prophecies, and that the Church did suspend the authorising of them.

CHAP. XI.
Some difficulties against what we have said, drawn out of Nostradamus his own Epistles.

We have (thanks be to God) sheltered this famous man from the back-biting of Calumny, but that we may clear wholly the Heaven of this reputation, we add this Chapter more for the clearing of some words that are in his Epistles, which seem to contradict some of those things we have said; the Author in his Epistles to his Son Cæsar, after he had said that God had disposed him to receive thy impression of supernatural lights, not by a Bacchant furor, nor by a Lymphatical motion, but by Astronomical assertions, he saith in the same Epistle towards the end; That sometimes in the Week being surprised by a Lymphatick humor, and making his Nocturnal Studies sweet by his calculations, he made Books of Prophecies, each one containing a hundred Astronomical Stanza’s, which he endeavoured to set out something obscurely, from which words it might be gathered, that he made his Prophecies by a Lymphatical Spirit, and by the only judicial Astrology.

And in the Epistle to King Henry the II. he seemeth to confess, that his Prophecie is nothing but a natural Genius, which he had by Inheritance from his Ancestors.

To these difficulties I answer, supposing first that anciently those were called Lymphaticks, who were mad for Love; because the first that was observed among the Ancients to be mad with that passion, threw himself into the water, which in Latine is called Lympha, whence all those that were afterwards transported with the excess of any passion, either of Love, Melancholy, Choler or Envy, have been called Lymphaticks.

So that in this place a Lymphatical motion is nothing properly but a deep Melancholy, which separating us from all Earthly things, doth transport the mind to extraordinary thoughts either good or bad.

This being suposed, I say that the Author confesseth, that his retreat, solitariness, nocturnal Watchings, and Melancholy, have disposed him much to the receiving of that Heavenly flame, which is the cause of Vaticination and Prophecie.

And because he did often spend the whole nights in this study, this Nocturnal retreat caused in him a retirement from all worldly things, at which time he felt a Divine elevating Virtue, that raised his understanding to those Divine Knowledges.

And because this elevating Vertue was caused in him by Divine operation, he doth attribute always his Prophecies to God alone; and by reason that this elevation hath some resemblance with that of the Lymphaticks, he saith, that sometimes he did Lymphatise not properly speaking, but by resemblance.

So that it is true, our Author did not receive his Prophecies by Lymphatical motion, or Bacchant furie, but from God himself, who did work in him while he observed his Astronomical assertions; and it is also true, that he felt this Divine operation by a kind of a Lymphatical motion.

Concerning what he saith to Henry the II. it is certain he maketh use of that Language as much by a motive of Truth to conceal that Grace which he had received from God, as of Humility.

By a Motive of Truth, because effectually; because all the Nostradamus’s had some tincture of Prophecie, and his Son the Capucin acknowledgeth it himself.

By a Motive of Humility; because acknowledging himself to be a miserable sinner, and seeing that this gift of Prophecie was not ordinarily granted but unto Saints. He chuseth rather to attribute his Prophecies to his Genius, than otherways to procure a Fame and Authority to his predictions.

In confirmation of what we have said, That he was often in that transport, many years before his death he made the Stanza of the Century, in which is contained all the great Works of the Philosophers, and foretelleth, that a great Divine shall attain to the perfection of that great Work, which Divine is called, the Divine Verbe, turning into French the Word θεολογος, which signifieth Divine Word or Verb. Nevertheless he never wrought himself at that Work, but got his living Honourably by his practise of Physick, by which we may see, that he did write some things which himself understood not, unless they were such general ones, as might be read in the Heavens.

CHAP. XII.
Elogies given to Nostradamus by several Authentical Authors.

If several Authors either by envy or ignorance have defamed our Author, others of no shall repute have taken his defence in hand.

D’Aurat one of the most excellent Poets of France, living at the same time as Nostradamus, made a few explications of his Prophecies, which as the report goes, did please the Readers. I am sorry I could not get them, it would have been some ease to me; for it is easier to add than to invent. The first Volume of the Lord la Croix du Main, maketh honourable mention of him, the same saith, that his Motto was Felix Oviam prior Ætas, Happy the first Age that was contented with their Flock, shewing by that, what esteem he had of frugality and sincerity of manners, and what aversion he had against the Vices of his Age, the unruliness of manners, and cousenage of men. Ronsard the Prince of the French Poets singeth his praises: The Lord Boucher in that great Volume, intitled the Mistical Crown, in favour of the future Croisade, doth vindicate our Author from Calumny, and expoundeth some of his Prophecies pretty happily.

I will not relate here what his Son Cæsar Nostradamus writeth modestly of him in his History of Provence, under Lewis the XII. Henry the II. and Charles the IX. his Evidence may be suspected, because of the Consanguinity.

One of the greatest Wits of this last Age, who desireth to be nameless, giveth him this Character.

First, That God Almighty hath chosen Michael Nostradamus among the common sort of Christians, to impart unto him the knowledge of many prodigious and extraordinary future things.

Secondly, He maintaineth, that after the Apostles and Canonical Prophets, he is the first of all in three things, in his certainty and infallibility, in the generality and in the quantity. As to the first, he doth not doubt but the Abbot Joachim ought to give him place; for though he hath foretold some things that have come to pass, he hath written a hundred others which are meer fopperies.

Thirdly, He maintaineth that the Emperour Leo in his prophetical Tables is far below him; for he doth only aim at those things which regard the Eastern Empire, as Theophrastus Paracelsus hath done for the Western.

Concerning the quantity of things, he maintaineth, that none of the others can dispute it with him; for Nostradamus hath made above a thousand stanza’s (if we had them all) each of which containeth two or three prophetical Truths, some of which regard the East, others the West, others some private Kingdoms and States others private and particular things, and all with Truth and certainty.

CHAP. XIII.
What these Stanza’s Prophecie of.

The Author in his Epistle to King Henry the II. saith, that he treateth of things which were to happen in many Cities and Towns of Europe, and of a part of Asia and Africa.

And to say Truth, I have found nothing in them concerning the East or West, Jappan or China.

He treateth chiefly of France as of his Native Kingdom, and of his own Countrey Provence, and that which is next to it, viz. Piemont.

He speaketh amply of the Popes, and of Italy, Turky and England: As for the Empire Spain, and Suedeland, he doth moderately speak of them. Concerning Æthiopia and Africa there is some nine or ten Stanza’s.

In all those places he foretelleth many things, not only general for every State, but also particular and individual for several persons. He also foretelleth many supernatural prodigies in the Heavens, the Air, the Sea, and the Land.

He hath inserted among his Prophecies four Horoscopes, the first of the Grandfather of the Lord l’Ainier in the Province of Anjou; the second of one called Urnel Vausile; the third of one Cosme du Jardin; and the fourth of one, whom he nameth not, but describeth him by his stature.

CHAP. XIV.
Since what time these Prophecies began.

It is certain that they began in January 1555. because he dedicated the first seven Centuries to his Son Cæsar the first day of March in the said year, and consequently they were made before that time, and we cannot allow less than two Months to an Author for the making of 700. Stanza’s: Nevertheless for a greater manifestation of his prophetical Spirit, I have not found any of his Prophecies that did come to pass before the first of March 1555.

As for the Eight, Ninth and Ten Century, there is reason to believe, that the effect of them doth not begin before the 27 June 1558. which is the date of his Liminary Epistle to Henry the II. Nevertheless he saith in the same Epistle, that in a writing by it self he will set down the exposition of his Prophecies, beginning the 14 of March 1557. and in the Epistle to Nostradamus his Son, he saith in general that he hath composed Books of Prophecies, each one containing one hundred Stanza’s, without specifying whether he spoke of the seven that he dedicated to him, or of all the others.

As for my part, I believe he had made them all in the year 1555. but that he had not yet examined the three last Centuries, according to the Calculation of his Astronomical assertions, as he seemeth to indicate often in his Epistle to Henry II. and to say the truth, I have found some Stanza’s, which were fulfilled before the year 1558. though very few.

As for the extent of his Prophecies, it is certain, that it is to the end of the World, as I shall make it appear in the explication of the 48, the 49, and 56. Stanza’s of the first Century, and the 72, 73, and 94. of the tenth, and all according to the Holy Scripture.

All these things being premised, we shall proceed to the explication of the Prophecies, setting first the Authors Luminary Epistle to his Son.


THE
PREFACE
TO Mr.
Michael Nostradamus
HIS
PROPHECIES,
Ad Cæsarem Nostradamum Filium vita & Felicitas.

Thy late coming, Cæsar Nostradamus, my son, hath caused me to bestow a great deal of time in continual and nocturnal watchings, that I might leave a Memorial of me after my death, to the common benefit of Mankind, concerning the things which the Divine Essence hath revealed to me by Astronomical Revolutions; and since it hath pleased the immortal God, that thou are come late into this World, and canst not say that thy years that are but few, but thy Months are incapable to receive into thy weak understanding, what I am forced to define of futurity, since it is not possible to leave thee in Writing, what might be obliterated by the injury of times, for the Hereditary word of occult prædictions shall be lockt up in my brest, considering also that the events are definitely uncertain, and that all is governed by the power of God, who inspired us not by a Bacchant fury or Lymphatick motion, but by Astronomical affections. Soli numine Divino afflati præsagiunt & Spiritu Prophetico particularia: Although I have often foretold long before what hath afterwards come to pass, and in particular Regions, acknowledging all to have been done by Divine Vertue and Inspiration, being willing to hold my peace by reason of the injury, not onely of the present time, but also of the future, and to put them in Writing, because the Kingdoms, Sects, and Regions shall be so Diametrically opposed, that if I should relate what shall happen hereafter, those of the present Reign, Sect, Religion and Faith, would find it so disagreeing with their fances, that they would condemn that which future Ages shall find and know to be true; considering also the saying of our Saviour, Nolite Sanctum dare canibus ne conculcent pedibus & conversi discumpant vos, which hath been the cause that I have withdrawn my tongue from the Vulgar, and my Pen from Paper. But afterwards I was willing for the common good to enlarge my self in dark and abstruse Sentences, declaring the future Events, chiefly the most urgent, and those which I foresaw (what ever humane mutation happened) would not offend the hearers, all under dark figures more then Prophetical, for although, Abscondisti hæc a sapientibus & prudensibus, i. e. potentibus & Regibus enucleasti ea exiguis & tennibus, and the Prophets by means onely of the immortal God and good Angels, have received the Spirit of Vaticination, by which they foresee things, and foretel future events; for nothing is perfect without him, whose power and goodness is so great to his Creatures, that though they are but men, nevertheless by the likeness of our good Genius to the Angels, this heat and Prophetical power draws near us, as it happens by the Beams of the Sun, which cast their influence both on Elementary and not Elementary bodies; as for us who are men, we cannot attain any thing by our natural knowledge, of the secrets of God our Creator. Quia non est nostrum nosse tempora nec momenta, &c.

Besides, although there is, or may come some persons, to whom God Almighty will reveal by impressions made on his understanding some secrets of the future, according to the Judicial Astrology, as it hath happened in former times, that a certain power and voluntary faculty possessed them as a flame of fire, so that by his inspiration, they were able to judge of Divine and Humane things: for the Divine works that are absolutely necessary, God will end. But my son, I speak to thee too obscurely; but as for the secrets that are received by the subtle Spirit of fire, by which the understanding being moved, doth contemplate the highest Celestial Bodies, as being active and vigilant to the very pronunciation without fear, or any shameful loquacity: all which proceeded from the Divine Power of the Eternal God, from whom all goodness floweth. Now my son, although I have inserted the name of Prophet here, I will not attribute to my self so sublime a Title, for qui Propheta dicitur hodie olim vocabatur videns, and Prophets are those properly (my Son) that see things remote from the natural knowledge of Men; but put the case, the Prophets by the means of the perfect light of Prophecy, may see as well Divine things as Humane, (which cannot be seeing the effects of future predictions) do extend a great way, for the secrets of God are incomprehensible, and the efficient power moveth afar off the natural knowledge, taking their beginning at the free will, cause those things to appear, which otherwise could not be known, neither by humane auguries, or any hidden knowledge or secret virtue under Heaven, but only by the means of some indivisible Eternal being, or Comitial and Herculean agitation, the causes come to be known by the Cœlestial motion. I say not therefore my Son, that you may not understand me well, because the knowledge of this matter cannot yet be imprinted in thy weak brain, but that future causes afar off are subject to the knowledge of humane Creatures, if (notwithstanding the Creature) things present and future were neither obscure nor hidden from the intellectual seal; but the perfect knowledge of the cause of things, cannot be acquired without the Divine Inspiration, seeing that all Prophetical Inspiration received, hath its original principle from God the Creator, next, from good Luck, and afterwards from Nature, therefore cases indifferently produced or not produced, the Prophecy partly happens where it hath been foretold, for the understanding being intellectually created, cannot see occult things, unless it be by the voice coming from the Lymbo, by the means of the thin flame, to which the knowledge of future causes is inclined; and also my Son I intreat thee not to bestow thy understanding on such fopperies, which drie up the Body and damn the Soul, bringing vexation to the Senses; chiefly abhor the vanity of the execrable Magick, forbidden by the Sacred Scriptures, and by the Canons of the Church; in the first of which is excepted Judicial Astrology, by which, and by the means of Divine Inspiration, with continual supputations, we have put in writting our Prophecies. And although this occult Philosophy was not forbidden, I could never be persuaded to meddle with it, although many Volums concerning that Art, which hath been concealed a great while, were presented to me; but fearing what might happen, after I had read them, I presented them to Vulcan, who while he was a devouring them, the flame mixing with the Air, made an unwonted light more bright then the usual flame, and as if it had been a Lightning, shining all the house over, as if it had been all in a flame; therefore that henceforth you might not be abused in the search of the perfect Transformation, as much selene as solar, and to seek in the waters uncorruptible mettal; I have burnt them all to ashes, but as to the judgement which cometh to be perfected by the help of the Cœlestial Judgement, I will manifest to you, that you may have knowledge of future things, rejecting the fantastical imaginations that should happen by the limiting the particularity of Places; by Divine inspiration, supernatural, according to the Cœlestial figures, the places, and a part of the time, by an occult, property, and by a Divine virtue, power and faculty, in the presence of which the three times are comprehended by Eternity, revolution being tyed to the cause that is past, present, and future, Quia omnia sunt Nuda & aperta, &c. therefore my Son, thou mayst notwithstanding thy tender brain comprehend things that shall happen hereafter, and may be foretold by cœlestial natural lights, and by the Spirit of Prophecy; not that I will attribute to my self the name of a Prophet, but as a mortal man, being no farther from Heaven by my sence, then I am from Earth by my Feet, possum errare, falli, decipi; I am the greatest Sinner of the World, subject to all humane afflictions, but being supprised sometimes in the week by a Prophetical humour, and by a long Calculation, pleasing my self in my Study, I have made Books of Prophecies, each one containing a hundred Astronomical Stanza’s, which I have joyned obscurely, and are perpetual Vaticinations from this year to the year 3797. at which some perhaps will frown, seeing so large an extention of time, and that I treat of every thing under the Moon, if thou livest the natural Age of a Man, thou shalt see in thy Climat, and under the Heaven of thy Nativity the future things that have been foretold, although God only is he who knoweth the Eternity of his Light, proceeding from himself; and I say freely to those to whom his incomprehensible greatness hath by a long melancholick inspiration revealed, that by the means of this occult cause Divinely manifested, chiefly by two principal causes, which are comprehended in the understanding of him that is Inspired and Prophecyeth, one is that he cleareth the supernatural Light in the person that foretelleth by the Doctrine of the Planets, and Prophecyeth by inspired Revelation, which is a kind of participation of the Divine Eternity, by the means of which the Prophet judgeth of what the Divine Spirit hath given him by the means of God the Creatour, and by a natural instigation, viz. that what is predicted is true, and hath taken its original from above, and such light and small flame is of all efficacy and sublimity, no less then the natural light makes the Philosophers so secure, that by the means of the principles of the first cause, they have attained the greatest depth of the profoundest science; but that I may not wander too far (my Son) from the capacity of thy sense, as also, because I find that Learning would be at a great loss, and that before the universal Conflagration shall happen so many great Inundations, that there shall scarce be any Land, that shall not be covered with water, and this shall last so long, that except Ænographies and Topographies all shall perish, also before and after these Inundations in many Countreys there shall be such scarcety of rain, and such a deal of fire, and burning stones shall fall from Heaven, that nothing unconsumed shall be left, and this shall happen a little while before the great conflagration; for although the Planet Mars makes an end of his course, and is come to the end of his last Period, nevertheless he shall begin it again, but some shall be gathered in Aquarius for many years, others in Cancer also for many years, and now we are governed by the Moon, under the power of Almighty God; which Moon before she hath finished her Circuit, the Sun shall come, and then Saturn, for according to the Cœlestial Signs, the Reign of Saturn shall come again, so that all being Calculated, the World draws near to an Anaragonick revolution, and at this present that I write this before 177. years, three Months, eleven Days, through Pestilence, Famine, War, and for the most part Inundations, the World between this and that prefixed time, before and after for several times shall be so diminished, and the people shall be so few, that they shall not find enough to Till the Ground, so that they shall remain fallow as long as they have been Tilled; although we be in the seventh Millenary, which ends all and brings us near the eighth, where the Firmament of the eighth Sphere is, which in a Latitudinary dimention is the place where the great God shall make an end of the revolution, where the Cœlestial Bodies shall begin to move again. By that Superiour motion that maketh the Earth firm and stable, non inclinabitur in seculum seculi, unless his will be accomplished, and not otherwise; although by ambiguous opinions exceeding all natural reasons by Mahometical Dreams, also sometimes God the Creator by the Ministers of his Messengers of fire and flame shows to our external senses, and chiefly to our eyes, the causes of future Predictions, signifying the future Event, that he will manifest to him that Prophecyeth for the Prophecy that is made by the Internal Light, comes to judge of the thing, partly with and by the means of External Light, for although the party which seemeth to have by the eye of understanding, what it hath not by the Lœsion of its imaginative sense, there is no reason why what he foretelleth should come by Divine Inspiration, or by the means of an Angelical Spirit, inspired into the Prophetick person, annointing him with vaticination, moving the fore part of his fancy, by divers nocturnal apparitions, so that by Astronomical administration, he Prophecyeth with a Divine certitude, joyned to the Holy prediction of the future, having no other regard then to the freedom of his mind. Come now my Son, and understand what I find by my revolutions, which are agreeing with the Divine Inspiration, viz. that the Swords draws near to us now, and the Plague and the War more horrid then hath been seen in the Life of three Men before, as also by Famine, which shall return often, for the Stars agree with the revolution, as also he said visitabo in virgâ ferreà iniquitates eorum & in verberibus percutiam eos, for the Mercies of God shall not be spread a while, my Son, before most of my Prophecies shall come to pass; then oftentimes shall happen sinister storms, (Conteram ergo (said the Lord) & confringam & non miserebor) and a thousand other accidents that shall happen by Waters and continual Rains, as I have more fully at large declared in my other Prophecies, written in solutâ oratione, limiting the places, times and prefixed terms, that men coming after, may see and know that those accidents are certainly come to pass, as we have marked in other places, speaking more clearly, although the explication be involved in obscurity, sed quando submovenda erit ignorantia, the case shall be made more clear; making an end here, my Son, accept of this Gift of thy Father Michael Nostradamus, hoping to expound to thee every Prophecy of these Stanza’s, praying to the Immortal God, that he would grant thee a long Life in Felicity.

From Salon this 1. of March 1555.


[1]

THE TRUE
PROPHECIES
OR
PROGNOSTICATIONS
OF
Michael Nostradamus,
Physician to HENRY II. FRANCIS II.
And CHARLES IX. Kings of FRANCE, and
one of the most excellent Astronomers that ever were.

CENTURY I.

I.

French.

Estant assis, de nuit secrette estude,
Seul, reposé sur la selle d’airain,
Flambe exigüe, sortant de solitude,
Fait proferer qui n’est a croire vain.

English.

Sitting by Night in my secret Study
Alone, resting upon the Brazen Stool,
A slight flame breaking forth out of that solitude,
Makes me utter what is not in vain to believe.

ANNOTATION.

In this Stanza, Nostradamus expresseth those Humane dispositions which he made use of to be favoured of God, for the knowledge of future things, to the benefit of the Publick.

[2]

The first Disposition, was the tranquility of Mind, when he saith, Sitting by night; Because a troubled Mind cannot see clearly the Things it is busie about, no more than tossed Waters can distinctly represent the Objects that are opposed to them. Thus we read in the Scripture, that the Prophet Elishah, being transported with Zeal against Joram King of Israel; and nevertheless willing to consult God concerning the event of the Warr against the Moabites, called for a Minstrel, that the Harmony of the Instrument might quiet his Mind, as it did happen. And it came to pass when the Minstrel played, that the Hand of the Lord came upon him, 2 Kings chap. 3. ver. 15.

The Author in his Dedicatory Epistle to his Son Cæsar, calleth this Tranquility of Mind, A long Melancholick Inspiration; because the Melancholick Humour and Mind sequestreth a Man from the concerns of worldly things, and maketh him present to himself, so that his Understanding is not darkned by a multitude of Species that troubles its Operation.

The Second Disposition, was, the Silence of the Night; For Man who is compounded of Body and Soul, doth notably intricate himself in External things by the commerce of the Senses with the Objects; which obligeth him to withdraw himself from visible things, when he intends to apply himself to some serious Study. And as the silence of the Night causeth in the Universe a cessation of noises and clashings in Business, Visits and Colloquies, the Mind is then more at rest. Besides that, Night covering with her Darkness our Hemisphere, our Senses are less distracted, and our Internal Faculties are more united to serve the Operations of the Understanding.

Therefore the Author in his two Liminary Epistles, makes often mention of his continual Nocturnal Watchings, of his Sweet-smelling nocturnal Studies, and of his Nocturnal and Prophetical Calculations.

The Third Disposition, was Solitariness; that is, having no other Conversation then that of his Books, being retired in his Study, Alone. For it seemeth that God commonly maketh use of Solitariness when he doth impart himself to Men, and revealeth them his Oracles: And the Sybils were chosen to be Prophets, as much for their Solitariness, as for their Chastity.

The Author saith, that with those three Dispositions he raised himself to the knowledge of future things; which is signified by those words, Resting upon the Brazen Stool. Servius in his Commentaries upon Virgil, speaking of this Brazen Stool, saith two things of it. The First, that this Stool was a Table set upon a Trevet, called by the Greeks τρίπους, and by the Latines Tripus. The Second is, that the Sybils, or the Priests of the Delphick Temple of Apollo, got upon that Table, when they went about to pronounce their Oracles. Pliny, in his 33. Book, Chap. 3. saith, that they called those Tables Cortinas, and that some were made of Brass for the use aforesaid.

From the use of that Brazen Trevet is come the Proverb, Ex tripode loqui. When one speaketh like an Oracle. Thus the Author willing to express, that being in his Study in the solitariness of the Night, he raised himself to the Knowledge of Future things, to write them, and transmit them to Posterity; he saith, He was sitting or resting upon the Brazen Stool.

Thus raising himself, and taking his Pen in hand to write what he should learn, he saith in the Third Verse, that A slight Flame, or small Light did insinuate it self in his understanding, by whose splendor and brightness he saw future things.

The Author in his Epistle to Cæsar his Son, expoundeth always this Prophetical Light, by the comparison of a shining Flame, and calleth it rather a Flame than a pure Light, because this Light doth not only discover the Mysteries, but more-over it lightens in us a certain Heat and Prophetical Power, as himself terms it; as if we should say a Sacred Enthusiasm, even (saith he) as the Sun coming near us with his Light, not only darteth upon all Elementary things the brightness of his Beams, but withal infuseth in them a certain quickning heat, which causeth the Vegetables to grow, and[3] upholdeth the Being of all other natural things; Even so (saith he) this good Genius, as the Ancients term it; or as we Christians say, that Divine Spirit of Prophecy coming near our understandings, not only importeth a Light to them, but more-over a certain heat and Prophetical Power, which strenghteneth them in the knowledge of the aforesaid things, and causeth them to breath out, as by a Sacred Enthusiasm some Prophetical Verses.

Which happeneth to them (saith the Author) coming out of Solitude, that is to say, when their Spirit stoopeth down, and by degrees cometh down from that sublime Region and high elevation, taking the Pen to write down the future time. Therefore he with his dispositions participating of that slight flame, coming out of his solitude, began to write and to utter, What is not in vain to believe.

The things that the Author hath written, shall not be unprofitable as we have proved already, and the time will come, when by the means of Divine Providence the Church shall receive the fruit thereof, at which we ought not to wonder, seeing that God saith of himself in Isaiah Chap. 48. Ver. 17. I am the Lord thy God, which teacheth thee to profit.

The Author foretelleth many wonders, of which we ought to be certain by the verification of those that are already past, seeing that it is the same Spirit that shewed them all.

The same Prophecies are also profitable, in that every where the Author condemneth Seditious and Rebellious persons, and Prophecieth the Churches Victory over her Enemies.

They are also profitable for particular Men that understand the meaning of them, for by it they may provide for their own business, according to the storm, undertaking nothing but upon sure grounds, following always the best party, and disposing themselves to patience, when the calamities are general, and involve together the guilty and guiltless. Therefore our Author saith well, A slight flame breaking forth out of that solitude, makes me utter what is not in vain to believe.

II.

French.

La Verge en main, mise au milieu des Branches,
De l’Onde je moüille & le Limbe & le Pied,
En peur j’escris fremissant par les manches;
Splendeur Divine: le Divine prez s’assied.

English.

With Rod in hand, set in the middle of the Branches,
With water I wet the Limb and the Foot,
In fear I writ, quaking in my sleeves,
Divine splendor! the Divine sitteth by.

ANNOT.

Amongst the customs, the Ancients observed, before they pronounced their Oracles; one was to take a Tuffie Branch of Laurel, and with it dipt in water, to sprinkle the edges and Columns of the Table, that was upon the Brazen Trevet, by which ceremonies they procured credit to their Oracles.

The Author willing to let us know, that his Verses were not only a simple writing,[4] but also Prophetical and full of Oracles, doth represent them to us by this Metaphore of the Ancients, when they did amuse the people with their ambiguous, and many times fallacious Oracles.

Being then sitting and quiet in his solitariness; coming out of that great devotion of mind, animated by the virtue of his good Genius, he putteth first the Rod into his hand, that is the Pen, and putteth it in the middle of the Branches, putting it between his Fingers. Secondly he dippeth this Rod into Water, dipping his Pen in his Ink; with this Pen dipt in Ink, he wetteth the Limb and the Foot, writing upon his paper from one end to the other, and from the top to the bottom.

Which we must understand by this word Lymbe, which is a Latin word, signifying the long and narrow pieces of stuffe, which women wore at the bottom of their Petticoats, therefore the Latins called them Lymbos, from the Latin Verbe Lambo, which in matter of cloths signifieth, to leek or sweep; and because those pieces of cloath were in the bottom of their Garments, the word hath been afterwards employed to signifie the brims of some things, so that the Lymbs of a sheet of paper, are the two margines, and the top and the bottom, as if it were the four ends of a Quadrangular Figure.

The third Verse sheweth the internal disposition of the Author, after he hath described his external one; that disposition was a Sacred quaking, which putting his heart into a palpitation, caused his hands and arms to shake, as if he had been taken with some fit of an Ague. This quaking is the disposition which the good Genius causeth in Prophets, that they may be humbled, and not be puffed up with pride, when they come near the Majesty of God, as we read in Daniel, St. John, and the 4th. of Esdras. Therefore the Author saith:

In fear I write, quaking in my sleeves. And because the Divine Spirit after he hath cast down those, to whom he will impart himself, doth afterwards quiet them; the Author therefore addeth, that a Divine splendor did sit by him.

III.

French.

Quand la littiere du tourbillon versée,
Et seront faces de leurs Manteaux couvers,
La Republique par gens nouveaux vexée,
Lors blancs & rouges jugeront a l’envers.

English.

When the litter shall be overthrown by a gust of wind,
And faces shall be covered with Cloaks,
The Common-wealth shall be troubled with a new kind of men,
Then white and red shall judge amiss.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses signifie that a great tempestuous wind was to happen, in which a litter should be overturned, and every one should muffle his face in his Cloak, for the fierceness of the wind.

And that presently after the Common-wealth should be troubled with new Sects and Opinions, which may be understood of the beginning of Reformation by Luther and Calvin, which was about that time.

[5]

The last Verse by the white and red signifieth here (as it doth thorough all the Book) the French and the Spaniards, because the French wear white Scarfes, and the Spaniards red ones: and consequently the troubles and jars that happened presently between those two Nations.

IV.

French.

Par l’Univers sera fait un Monarque,
Qu’en paix & vie ne sera longuement,
Lors se perdra la Piscature Barque,
Sera regie en plus grand detriment.

English.

In the World shall be one Monarch,
Who shall be not long alive, nor in peace,
Then shall be lost the Fishing Boat,
And be governed with worse detriment.

ANNOT.

That Monarch was Henry the II. King of France, who did not Reign long, but was unfortunately slain, running at Tilt against the Earl of Montgomery (as we shall see hereafter) and almost during all his Reign had Wars with Charles the V. Emperour, and his Son Philip the II. King of Spain; the said Emperour in that time did sack Rome, took the Pope Clement the VII. prisoner, which is signified here; as also in several other places by the loss of the Fishing Boat; the Roman Church being often compared to a Ship or Boat.

V.

French.

Chassez seront sans faire long combat.
Par le Païs seront plus fort grevez,
Bourg & Cité auront plus grand debat,
Carcas, Narbonne auront cœurs esprouvez.

English.

They shall be driven away without great fighting,
Those of the Countrey shall be more grieved,
Town and City shall have a greater debate,
Carcas, Narbonne shall have their hearts tryed.

ANNOT.

Herein is nothing mystical, the meaning is that some of the Protestant party intending to take or vex the Cities of Carcassone and Narbonne in Languedoc, shall be easily repulsed, and shall afterward fall upon the Countrey round about, which shall suffer for.

[6]

VI.

French.

L’œil de Ravenne sera destitué,
Quand a ses pieds les aisles sailliront;
Les deux de Bresse auront constitué,
Turin, Verceil, que Gaulois fouleront.

English.

The eye of Ravenna shall be forsaken,
When the wings shall rise at his feet,
The two of Brescia shall have constituted,
Turin, Verceil, which the French shall tread upon.

ANNOT.

This is a confirmation of the fourth Stanza, concerning the loss of the Pope, Clement the VII. who is called here the eye of Ravenna, because he is Lord of that famous City, which was once an Exarchat of the Empire.

The wings that shall rise at, or against his feet, shall be those of the Eagle, which are the Arms of the Emperour.

The two of Brescia were the Governour and Proveditor of Venice in that place, who would at that time have endeavoured to seize upon Turin and Verceil, the two chiefest Towns of Piemont, but were prevented by the French.

VII.

French.

Tard arrivé, l’execution faite,
Le Vent contrare, Lettres au chemin prinses,
Les Conjurez quatorze d’une Secte,
Par le Rousseau seront les entreprinses.

English.

One coming too late, the execution shall be done,
The Wind being contrary, and Letters intercepted by the way,
The Conspirators fourteen of a Sect,
By the Red-hair’d Man the undertaking shall be made.

ANNOT.

The sense of the whole is this, there shall be fourteen Conspirators of one mind, and their Ring-leader, a Red-haired man, who shall be put to death, because their Reprieve could not come timely enough, being hindered by cross winds, and Letters intercepted. I could find no particular things in History concerning this.

[7]

VIII.

French.

Combien de fois prinse Cité Solaire,
Seras, changeant les Loix barbares & vaines,
Ton mal s’approche, plus seras tributaire,
Le grand Adrie recouvrira tes veines.

English.

How often taken O solar City,
Shalt thou be? changing the barbarian and vain Laws,
Thy evil growth nigh, thou shalt be more tributary,
The great Adria shall recover thy veins.

ANNOT.

It is hard to judge what he meaneth by the Solar City that shall be so often taken.

As by Adria, it is certain he meaneth Venice, that was so called anciently, because of its scituation in the Adriatick Sea.

IX.

French.

De l’Orient viendra le cœur punique,
Fascher Adrie, & les hoirs Romulides,
Accompagné de la classe Libique,
Trembler Melites, & proches Isles vuides.

English.

From the East shall come the African heart,
To vex Adria, and the Heirs of Romulus,
Accompanied with the Libian fleet
Melites shall tremble, and the Neighbouring Islands be empty.

ANNOT.

This was a clear and true Prognostication of that famous Invasion made upon Maltha, by the grand Signor Solyman the magnificent, in the year of our Lord 1565. and just ten years after the writing of this Prophecy, wherein that Island, and some of the Neighbouring ones were wholly depopulated by the Turks, to the terror of Venice, called here Adria, and of all the Islands of the Adriatick Sea. For the better understanding of this, the Reader must observe, that Punicus in Latin signifieth Africa, so that the African heart signifieth the help the Turk had from Tunis, Tripoly, and Algier, Cities seated in Africa, and under the Turkish Dominion; by which not only Maltha (which in Latin is Melita) but Venice and Rome were put into a great fright; the conclusion of this Siege was, that after six weeks time, and the loss of 26000. Men, the Turks were constrained shamefully to retire. Vide the Turkish History.

[8]

X.

French.

Sergens transmis dans la Cage de Fer,
Ou les Enfans septains du Roy sont pris,
Les vieux & Peres sortiront bas d’Enfer,
Ains mourir voir de son fruit mort & cris.

English.

Sergeants sent into an Iron Cage,
Where the seven Children of the King are,
The old Men and Fathers shall come out of Hell,
And before they die shall see the death and cries of their fruit.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy signifieth, that some Sergeants or Executioners shall be sent into a Prison, to put to death seven Children, servants of a King that were Imprisoned there, and that some old Men their Fathers, shall see their death, and hear their cries.

XI.

French.

Le mouvement de Sens, Cœur, Pieds, & Mains,
Seront d’accord, Naples, Leon, Sicile,
Glaives, Feux, Eaux, puis au Noble Romains,
Plongez, Tuez, Morts, par cerveau debile.

English.

The motion of the Sense, Heart, Feet and Hands,
Shall agree, Naples, Leon, Sicily,
Swords, Fires, Waters, then to the noble Romans,
Dipt, Killed, Dead, by a weak-brain.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses signifie the concord that shall be among the Spanish dominions, expressed here by Sense, Heart, Feet, and Hands. After which, the Romans or those of Rome, shall be evilly intreated, being drowned, killed, and put to death by a weak brain. I guess this to have come to pass, when the Emperour Charles the V. his Army sacked Rome, under the command of the Duke of Bourbon, who was killed at the Assault; and of the Prince of Orange, who permitted licentiousness to his Souldiers, and suffered them to commit more violence, than ever the Goths or Vandales did, and therefore is called here weak brain. This Prince of Orange was of the House of Chalon, after which came that of Nassau.

[9]

XII.

French.

Dans peu ira fauce brute fragile,
De bas en haut eslevé promptement,
Puis en estant desloyal & labile,
Qui de Verone aura gouvernment.

English.

Within a little while a false frail brute shall go,
From low to high, being quickly raised,
By reason that he shall have the Government of Verona,
Shall be unfaithful and slippery.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth of a wicked person, who in a short time shall be from a low degree exalted to a high one, by reason that those that have the Government of Verona, shall be unfaithful and slippery. That person seemeth to be some Pope, who from a low degree shall be exalted to that dignity, by the unfaithfulness and slipperiness of the Venetians, who are now Lords of the City Verona in Italy.

XIII.

French.

Les exiles, par ire, haine intestine,
Feront au Roy grand conjuration,
Secret mettront ennemis par la mine,
Et les vieux siens, contre eux sedition.

English.

The banished, by choler, and intestine hatred
Shall make against the King a great conspiracy,
They shall put secret enemies in the mine,
And the old his own against them sedition.

ANNOT.

Although this Prophecie seemeth to be indefinitely spoken, because in every Countrey or Kingdom where there is banished people, they most commonly plot against their King and Countrey; nevertheless I find two remarkable Histories to make this good, one in France, and the other in England. That of France is thus.

The Cardinal of Lorrain, and the Duke of Guise his Brother, being in great favour with Henry II. the Queen Mother promoted them in the beginning of the Reign of Francis II. his successor, so that the Cardinal was made Lord high Treasurer, and the Duke General of the Armies, to the prejudice of the Constable of Montmorency. Those two favourites, fearing the persecution that is raised by envy,[10] did remove all the great ones from the Court, whether they were commanded to do so, or whether they had any other pretences.

The Princes of Condé, and of la Roche sur yon, were sent into Flanders to Philip II. Condé, to confirm the alliance between the two Crowns, and la Roche sur yon to carry the Order of France.

Diana of Poitiers Dutchess of Valentenois, was banished from Court, and compelled to surrender to the Queen all the Jewels she had extorted from the King, besides the Castle of Chenonceaux, which the Queen took for her self.

The Marshal St. Andrew was likewise banished from the Court. The King of Navarre was in Bearn.

The Constable took also his leave, and surrendred to the King the Seal of his Office. On the other side, the Protestants began to stir notably, having on their part many Princes, as that of Condé, of Porcien, Gaspard, of Coligny, Admiral of France, d’Andelot, and the Cardinal of Chastillon his brothers, Magdalene of Mailly, their Sister, Lady of Roye, the King of Navarre. All these discontented persons, and the Protestants made a great conspiracy under pretence of Religion, and of freeing the King from the tyranny of the Guisians.

They did by Choler, the Protestants because they had been so ill used, in the time of Francis I. and Henry II. and lately by the Guisians. And the discontented, for to pull down their power, it was also by an intestine hatred, because the Constable could not brook to be dispossessed of his Office of great Master, which was given to the Duke of Guise; and the others to see themselves from the management of Affairs, and the Protestants by the spirit of a contrary Religion.

Their conspiracy tended to expel the Guisians, and to seise upon the Queen, the King, and his Brothers.

To compass their end, they secretly sent some trusty persons of their own, who nevertheless feigned to be their Enemies; insomuch that the King of Navarre sent them word, that he would be always of their party, though apparently he took the Courts part.

But the Old his own, saith the fourth Verse, that is to say, the Kings old friends shall raise Sedition against them, which happened in the year 1650. when the Guisians having discovered the conspiracy that was made at Nantes, the 1. of February 1560. whose chief Ring-leader was the Lord La Renaudie; they presently got the King out of Blois, and carryed him to Amboise, caused the Town to be fortified, and set strong Guards upon all the passages.

The day appointed for the execution of the conspiracy at Blois, was the 10th of March: But the King being got to Amboise, the Conspirators went thither in such great numbers, and under such specious pretences, that had they not been betrayed, no body would have suspected them. All the Suburbs and the Countrey Towns thereabouts were full of them. The Prince of Condé, the Admiral, d’Andelot, and his Brother the Cardinal, were all there.

Then the Guisians began to fall to work, and to set upon the Conspirators on all sides.

Abundance were taken, some in the City, some in the Suburbs, others in the Countrey round about.

Most of these were slain before they could come to Town, or be carried to Prison. And their process was so short that they were hanged in their Boots and Spurs.

The Scouts did every where kill those they met withall. To conclude, it proved a very Bloody Tragedy.

La Renaudie the Chief of the Conspirators, was met with by the Lord Pardaillan a Gascon. At the first approach La Renaudie killed him; but himself was killed[11] by Pardeillan’s Servant, and his dead body brought and hanged at Amboise.

The second History is concerning England, which palpably makes this Prophecie good, if we make reflection upon what hath happened in this last Century of years, concerning banished people that have conspired against their King and Countrey, as we may see through all the Life of Queen Elizabeth, and by that famous Plot of the Gun-powder-Treason in King James’s time, which must be understood here by the Mine.

XIV.

French.

De gens esclave, chansons, chants, & requestes,
Captifs par Princes, & Seigneurs aux prisons,
A l’advenir par Idiots sans testes,
Seront receus par divins oraisons.

English.

From slavish people, Songs, Tunes and requests,
Being kept Prisoners by Princes and Lords,
For the future by headless Idiots,
Shall be admitted by divine prayers.

ANNOT.

This is a prognostication of the beginning and increase of the Protestants in France, who began to sing their Psalms in French, and from time to time presented their request for tolleration. The Author being a zealous Papist calleth them Idiots, and that notwithstanding the persecution that should be against them, being put in Prison by Princes and Lords, they should at last be admitted by reason of their often praying to God.

XV.

French.

Mars nous menace par la force bellique,
Septante fois fera le sang respandre,
Auge & ruine de l’Ecclesiastique,
Et par ceux qui d’eux rien ne voudront entendre.

English.

Mars threatneth us of a Warlike force,
Seventy times he shall cause blood to be shed,
The flourishing and ruine of the Clergy,
And by those that will hear nothing from them.

ANNOT.

The Author having premonished us in his Preface, that God having imparted to him the knowledge of many future things, he was curious to know if his Divine[12] Majesty had written the same thing in the Cœlestial Book, as concerning the States, Empires, Monarchies, Provinces and Cities, and he found that it was even so as it had been revealed to him, so that the Book of Heaven, written with Gods own hand, in so many shining Characters, might serve to studious men for a light and a Torch to discover very near the common estate of the world.

He then having learned from God in his solitariness, the prosperities and afflictions of the Clergy, from the beginning of the year 1555. to the end of the world; he found that there was an agreement between his prophetical Knowledge, and the motion of the Heavenly Bodies; because having made the Systeme of the years after 1550. he found that Mars was in a dangerous Aspect to the Ecclesiastical estate, and found that this Planet by its position did presage a long, bloody and horrid Catastrophe in the world, by which the Ecclesiastical estate should suffer much.

To make good this prediction, the Author doth assure us in his Preface, that he had considered the disposition of this Planet, not only in the year 1555. but also in the years following, and joyning together all that he had found in his Ephemerides, he found that this Planet did on all sides presage most bloody actions. Although, saith he, the Planet of Mars maketh an end of its course, and is come to its last Period: nevertheless it will begin it again, but some gathered in Aquarius for many years, and others by long and continual years.

As if he would say that his prediction ought not to be rejected; because Mars ended his course, and cometh to its late period; for it would take again its Exaltation and Dominion with a worse conjunction, having his Astronomical dignities, with the Conjunction of other Planets in the Sign of Aquarius during many years, and in the Sign of Cancer for many years more.

Which maketh the Author conclude, that within the space of 177. years, three months and eleven dayes, the world shall be afflicted with Wars, Plagues, Famines and Innundations, that scarce any body shall be left to Till the Ground. By which prediction we learn that those evils began in the year 1555. the first of March, which is the date of the Authors Book, and shall last till the second of June 1732. abating the ten days of the Gregorian Calender.

During which time, he saith, that Mars threatneth us with bloody Wars that shall be reiterated 70 times.

This word seventy doth not signifie a determinate number, but a great number indeterminated according to the Phrase of the Scripture, which by the number of seven signifieth many times, and by that of seventy incomparably many times more. Thus the Scripture saith, that the just man falleth seven times in one day, that is many times, and our Saviour saith to St. Peter, that we ought to forgive our Enemies, not only seven times, but seventy times seven; that is innumerable times.

We have found the truth of this Prophecie to this very day. 1. In France, by the Wars between Henry II. and Charles V. and Philip II. 2. By the Wars of Charles IX. against the Protestants, wherein so much blood was spilt on both sides. 3. By Henry III. against the same Protestants, and factions of his time, and then against the Parisians and others of their league. 4. Between Henry IV. and those of the league in his revolted Kingdom. 5. By the Wars of Lewis XIII. against the Protestants, against the Duke of Savoy, in the Valteline, in Piemont, in Lorrain, in Alsatia, in Catalonia, in Franche-Conty, in Flanders, and for the defence of Portugal, which have been continued by his successor Lewis XIV. now Reigning.

Italy did also find the truth of this prophecie, by the Wars between Paul IV. and the Spaniard, between Pius V. and the Turks, between Clement VIII. and the Duke of Ferrara, between the Emperour and the Duke of Mantua, between Urban VIII. and the Duke of Parma, between the Venetians and the Florentines,[13] by the revolt of the Kingdom of Naples, under the conduct of the Duke of Guise.

England hath had its share of it under Queen Elizabeth, by the revolt of Yorkshire, and some other Provinces, by the Spanish fleet of 88.

By the death of Queen Mary, by the revolt of the Kingdom against Charles I. And by the horrid perfidiousness of Cromwel.

Germany hath made it good by the War against the Turks, the Protestants and the Swedes.

Poland hath done the same against the Russians, Tartars, Turks, Cassaks and Swedes.

And Venice against the Turk, for the Islands of Cyprus and Candia, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Wars of Dalmatia.

This Mars besides presageth two contrary things, one is the Auge or Exaltation, the other the ruine of the Clergy: where it is to be observed, the Auge in tearms of Astrology signifieth mounting or ascending, and cometh from the Latin verbe augere, which signifieth to augment or increase. This augmentation and ruine of the Clergy is made good by the several changes that have been in the Ecclesiastical estate, in France, England, Low-Countreys, Denmark, Swede, Poland, Hungary, Valachia, Transylvania, Moldavia, Dalmatia, Geneva, Switzerland, &c.

The fourth Verse saith. By those that will hear nothing from them: that is, by the Protestants that will hear nothing from the Roman Catholicks.

XVI.

French.

Faux a l’Estang, joint vers la Sagittaire,
En son haut Auge de l’Exaltation,
Peste, Famine, mort de main Militaire,
Le Siecle approcher de renovation.

English.

The Sith to the Fish-pond, joyned to Sagittarius,
In the highest Auge of the Exaltation,
Plague, Famine, Death by a Military hand,
The age groweth near to its renovation.

ANNOT.

The sense of all this is, that when a Meadow that was a Fish-pond before, shall be Mowed, the Sign of Sagittarius being in its Auge or ascendant, then shall Plague, Famine, and War Reign, and that age (which a Century of years shall be near its end and renovation viz. of another Century.)

XVII.

French.

Par quarante ans l’Iris n’apparoistra,
Par quarante ans tous les jours sera veu,
La Terre aride en siccité croistra,
Et grand deluge quand sera apparceu.
[14]

English.

During fourty years the Rainbow shall not appear,
During fourty years it shall be seen every day.
The parched Earth shall wax dryer and dryer,
And great Flouds shall be when it shall appear.

ANNOT.

The Interpretation of this is easie, and signifieth nothing else but that during 40. years the Rainbow shall not be seen, and during that time there shall be an exceeding great drought upon the Earth, and that for 40. years after the Rainbow shall be seen every day, which shall cause great flouds and innundations.

XVIII.

French.

Par la discorde, negligence Gauloise,
Sera passage a Mahomet ouvert,
De sang trempé la Terre & Mer Senoise,
Le Port Phocen de Voiles & Nefs couvert.

English.

Through the discord and negligence of the French,
A passage shall be opened to Mahomet,
The Land and Sea of Sienna shall be bloody,
The Phocen Haven shall be covered with Sails and Ships.

ANNOT.

In the year 1559. Sultan Solyman called Leonclavius, according to the alliance made between him and Francis I. King of France, was desired by Henry II. his Son to send him some succours: Whereupon he sent some of his Gallies to scour the Tyrrhenean Sea (otherwise the Sea of Tuscany) to give a diversion to the Spanish forces in Italy, while the King by the means of the Marshal of Brissac, should continue his Conquests in the Piemont and Milanese.

All what this Turkish Fleet did, was to plunder and over-run the Island of Elbe, and to attempt Piombino without effect; and because these places were seated upon the Sea of Sienna, called in Latin Mare Tirrhenum, the Author saith that both the Land and Sea of Sienna shall be died with Blood, and at that time the Haven of Marseilles, which was called by the Ancients, Port-Phocen was full of Sales and Ships, as well to go into the Island of Corse, as for other designs. This History makes good that Stanza which saith, that through the discord and negligence of the French, a passage shall be opened to Mahomet, wherein it is to be observed that the Marshal of Brissac doing wonders for the King in Piemont, his virtue got him abundance of enviers and enemies in the Kings Councel, which was the cause of a great discord among them, by the diversity of opinions, and this diversity was the cause of a prodigious negligence in sending to him relief, as Turpin witnesseth in his History of Naples, and Paradin in the continuation of his History.

[15]

By this discord and negligence, a passage was opened to Mahomet, his Fleet going freely upon the Mediterranean Sea near the Coasts of France. And the reason of it was, because this discord and negligence did compel Henry the II. to ask succours of Solyman, that the Spaniard might be compelled to divide his Forces in sending some to the Sea-Towns, and so should not be so strong in Piemont; and thus must be understood the French discord and negligence, in the first and second Verse. As for the many Sails and Ships that were then in the Haven of Marseilles, to go into the Island of Corsica, the following Stanza’s are full of predictions concerning it.

XIX.

French.

Lors que Serpens viendront circuir l’Air,
Le sang Troien versé par les Espagnes,
Par eux: grand nombre en sera fait tare,
Chef fuit, caché aux Marets dans les saignes.

English.

When Serpents shall come to encompass the Are,
The Trojan blood shall be vexed by Spain,
By them, a great number shall perish,
Chief runneth away, and is hid in the rushes of the Marishes.

ANNOT.

By the Serpents, the Author being a Roman Catholick, meaneth the Protestants, who then began to appear numerous in the Reigns of Francis the I. and Henry the II. in whose time the Admiral Coligny was the chief among them, for his great feats in War.

These Serpents or Protestants begun to encompass the Are, that is to say, the Church and the Altar, which in Latin is called Ara.

And that happened when the Trojan-blood was vexed by Spain. By the Trojan-blood, the Author meaneth the French blood, according to the vulgar opinion, that the French are descended from the Trojans. The French were then vexed by the Spaniards, at the Battle of St. Laurence, and at the taking of St. Quentin, and other places in the Year 1557.

The third Verse saith by them, that is, by the Protestants a great number shall perish, that is to say, a great number of French. Among whom the Admiral of Chatillon having done what was possible to be done at the defence of St. Quentin, and seeing the Town taken, run away with three more, and hid himself among the Rushes that are in the Boggs about the Town, where he was found, and carried Prisoner to the Duke of Savoy, who received him very honorably, according to his valour and deserts.

Observe that the word Saignes here signifieth in old Provencal a Marish.

XX.

French.

Tours, Orleans, Blois, Angers, Renes & Nantes,
Cités vexées par soudain changement,
Par Langues estranges seront tendues Tentes,
Fleuves, Darts, Rennes, Terre & Mer tremblement.
[16]

English.

Tours, Orleans, Blois, Angers, Renes, and Nantes,
Cities vexed by a sudden change,
By strange Languages Tents shall be set up,
Rivers, Darts, Rennes, Land, and Sea shall quake.

ANNOT.

All the Cities mentioned in the first Verse are seated by the River of Loire, and are threatned here of a sudden change, and that some strangers shall set up their Tents against them, and chiefly at Rennes, there shall be an Earth-quake felt both by Sea and Land.

XXI.

French.

Profonde argile blanche nourrit rocher,
Qui d’un abysme istra l’acticineuse,
En vain troublez ne l’oseront toucher,
Ignorant estre au fond terre argileuse.

English.

A deep white clay feedeth a Rock,
Which clay shall break out of the deep like milk,
In vain people shall be troubled not daring to touch it,
Being ignorant that in the bottom there is a milky clay.

ANNOT.

It is a Rock in the middle of the Sea, whose Roots are fed by a white clay, which is at the foot of this Rock, in the bottom of the Sea, and therefore called deep.

This clay being softned, and dissolved by the Sea-water, shall appear upon the superficies of it like milk about the Rock. Those that shall see this wonder, being ignorant that in the bottom there is a milky clay, shall in vain be troubled at it, and shall not dare to touch it.

XXII.

French.

Ce qui vivra & n’aura aucun sens,
Viendra le Fer a mort son artifice,
Autun, Chalons, Langres & les deux Sens,
La Guerre & la Glasse fera grand malefice.

English.

That which shall live, and shall have no sence,
The Lion shall destroy the art of it,
Autun, Chalons, Langres, and both Sens,
The War and the Ice shall do great harm.

[17]

ANNOT.

This is a great Riddle, which was never found out till now; and had I not been born in the Countrey where the History did happen, it might have been unknown to this day, and buried in oblivion.

The History of a λιθοπαίδιον or petrified child.

In the year of the Lord 1613. which was that of my Birth. There was in the Town of Sens a Taylors Wife named Columba Chatry, who presently after her marriage conceived, and for the space of 28. years persuaded her self to be with Child, had all the signs of it in the beginning of her impregnation, and having gone her compleat time, she begun to feel the pains of a woman in Labour, with great gripings in the Guts. The Urine was suppressed for a while, but at last it broke out with a strong current. This quantity of water not coming so much out of the Bladder as was supposed, as from the womb, by the breaking of the Membrane, called Amnion, seeing that with those serous excrements, she avoided some conjealed blood. After that her breast begun to fall, and the Child had little or no motion, her pains being less than they were, which caused no small admiration to the Midwifes, who expected a safe deliverance. For the space of three years after, this woman kept her Bed, and was brought to Deaths door, complaining of gripings and a hard swelling, which she desired all the Physitians and Chyrurgeons to feel, having lost all appetite, but that little which she recovered by the use of sharp things, as Verjuice, Lemmons, &c. she was wont to say to her Neighbours, that she bare a Child that should be the cause of her death. After she was dead, her Husband got two experienced Chyrurgeons to open her body, who having opened the belly, and taken away the Peritonæum, saw the Womb of several colours, as the flesh that is about the head and neck of a Turky-cock, but as it were of a Horny substance. They begun to make an incision in it with a Rasour, but finding it resisted the edge, they begun to use their Incision knives with all their strength; at last one of them by chance hit the Scull, and after that some Ribs, and then the Shoulder bone, by which, knowing that there was bones contained in that lump, with greater strength they made a deeper incision, and having parted the edges of the womb, saw in the bottom of the womb a Child, wrapped in the membrane, called Allantoides; at which the Chyrugeons wondering, sent for the Physitians to have their opinion in a thing that is almost beyond belief; in the mean time people flocking thither from all parts, and troubling the Chyrurgeons in their operation; they thought good to take away with their Instruments all that Lump, as a Tree from its Roots, and to carry it home, that they might with more time and leasure examine the whole Anatomy of it. In that hasty pulling out of the Child, they had no time to observe what Chorion it had, what umbilical Vessels, and what connexion there was of the Allantoides with the Womb, and with the Child, chiefly about the right hip, the Buttocks, and the Back-bone being all grown solid together.

The scituation of the Child was almost Spherical, the face leaning upon the breast, and the Nostrils upon the Knees; the bones of the Head were but thin, but very hard, and shining like Horn; the skin of the Head was hairy in many places; the head did hang so much upon the left arm, that the Ear, and part of the skull had given way to the Shoulder-bone; the Elbow was bent towards the Shoulder stretching only his hand, which was so close shut, and the fingers sticking so fast to the Palm of it, that although they did appear distinct one from another, nevertheless it was all but one and the same stone; the right arm did stretch its hand towards the Navel, which unadvisedly was broken by the wrist, and left in the Mothers Belly; the left Thigh, Knee and Leg were on the top of the right ones, with which they were so entangled, that the left heel, and the sole of the foot were planted upon the right foot,[18] who seemed to have given place to them, and were almost inseparably joyned; for all such hardness of the matter, the body was not less than that of other Children of the same age, but kept a perfect fulness and proportion all the internal parts, as the Brains, the Heart, the Liver, had their natural shape, and were not altogether so hard as the external parts, so that to this very day this little body defieth all kind of corruption.

This Child was kept in my time by one Mr. Michel a Chirurgion of Sens, who kindly shewed it to all the strangers that came far and near to see it. The Fame of it was so great, that Doctor Mayerne coming from Switzerland to England, took his way through Sens to see it, and would have perswaded King Charles I. to buy it, as himself told me; since that I hear it was fallen into the hands of the Venetians. In this History there is two observable wonders. One, that the Child dying in the Womb, did not corrupt, and so cause the death of its Mother. The other, by what vertue or power of the body this child was petrified, seeing that the Womb is a hot and moist place, and therefore more subject to putrifaction. Those that will satisfie themselves with the reasons of it, and the truth of the History, may read Johannes Alibosius Physician of Sens, who was an eye witness of it, and Sennertus in his book of Sympt. quam feminis in utero accidant.

Now this accident being so rare, and without parallel, our Author thought fit to foretel it, and to cover it in abscure tearms, that he might not appear ridiculous in so admirable an event. When therefore he saith, That which shall live and shall have no Sense, he meaneth this λιθοπαίδιον or child petrified, which had a Life while it was in the Mothers belly, being tied to it by the several Vessels and connexions, known to Anatomists, and yet was senseless in that it was petrified. When in the second verse he saith, The Iron shall destroy the art of it, he meaneth that it should be spoiled by the rasour, in the two last verses he saith, that the Towns of Autun, Chalons, Langres, and Sens the Town in which this did happen should that same year suffer much damage by Hail and Ice, which did come to pass, as many persons may justify in that Countrey, that are alive to this day.

XXIII.

French.

Au mois troisiesme se levant le Soleil,
Sanglier, Leopard, aux champs Mars pour combatre,
Leopard lassé au Ciel esttend son œil,
Un Aigle autour du Soleil voit sesbatre.

English.

In the third month at the rising of the Sun,
The Boar and Leopard in Marth camp to fight;
The Leopard weary, lift his eyes to Haven,
And seeth an Eagle playing about the Sun.

ANNOT.

This signifieth a particular accident, viz. that in the third Month, which is that of March, at the rising of the Sun, the Boar and the Leopard, that is, two persons of quality hidden under these names, shall go into the fields to fight a Duel. The Leopard one of them being weary, shall lift up his eyes to Heaven, calling upon God, and thereupon shall see an Eagle playing about the Sun, that is, shall get the Victory, of which the Eagle is the Emblem.

[19]

XXIV.

French.

A Cité nevue pensif pour condamner,
Loisel de proie au ciel se vient offrir,
Apres Victoire a Captifs pardonner
Cremone & Mantoue grands maux auront souffert.

English.

In the new City for to condemn a Prisoner,
The Bird of pray shall offer himself to Heaven,
After the Victory, the Prisoners shall be forgiven,
After Cremona and Mantua have suffered many troubles.

ANNOT.

This name of new City is appropriated to several ones in every Countrey. The French have many Villeneufuas, the Germans many Newstads, the Italians and Spaniards many Villanovas, so that it is hard to guess which of them the Author meaneth. The missing of this dore makes the rest of the Prophecie so obscure, that I had rather leave it to the liberty of the Reader, than to pretend a true explication of it. I shall only say, that Cremona and Mantua are two famous Towns in Italy, which are here threatned.

XXV.

French.

Perdu, trouvé, caché de si long siecle
Sera Pasteur demy-Dieu honoré,
Ains que la Lune acheve son grand Siecle,
Par autre vents sera deshonoré.

English.

Lost, found again, hidden so great a while,
A Pastor as Deme-God shall be honoured;
But before the Moon endeth her great Age,
By other winds he shall be dishonoured.

ANNOT.

The Prophecie is concerning the body of a famous Churchman, which was lost, and shall be found again, and worshiped as a Demy-God, but before the Moon hath run her great age, which is of 13 Months, it shall be vilified and dishonoured.

[20]

XXVI.

French.

Le grand du Foudre tombe d’heure diurne,
Mal & predit par Porteur populaire,
Suivant presage tombe d’heure nocturne,
Conflit Rheims, Londres, Etrusque Pestifere.

English.

The great Man falleth by the Lightning in the day time,
An evil foretold by a common Porter;
According to this foretelling another falleth in the night,
A fight at Rhemes, and the Plague at London and Tuscany.

ANNOT.

This is concerning some great man, who being premonished by a common Carrier not to travel upon a certain day, did slight the advice, and was strucken by Lightning in the day time, and another in the night; at the same time there was a fight at Rhemes, and the Plague at London and in Tuscany, which in Latin is called Etruria.

XXVII.

French.

Des soubs le Chesne Guyen du Ciel frappé,
Non loin de la est caché le Thresor,
Qui par long Siecles avoit esté grappé,
Trouvé mourra, l’œil crevé de ressor.

English.

Under the Oak Guyen strucken from Heaven,
Not far from it is the Treasure hidden,
Which hath been many Ages a gathering;
Being found he shall die, the eye put out by a spring.

ANNOT.

The sense of it is, that some body (who is named here Guyen) being under an Oak shall be strucken with the lightning, and that near that place there is a great Treasure, that hath been many years a gathering, and that he who shall find it shall die, being shot in the eye with a Fire-lock.

XXVIII.

French.

La Tour de Bouk craindra fuste Barbare,
Un temps, long temps apres Barque Hesperique,
Bestial, gens meubles tous deux feront grand tare,
Taurus & Libra, quelle mortelle pique?
[21]

English.

The Tower of Bouk shall be in fear of a Barbarian Fleet,
For a while, and long after afraid of Spanish shipping,
Flocks, peoples, goods both shall receive great damage,
Taurus and Libra, O what a deadly feud.

ANNOT.

The Tower of Bouk is a strong place seated by the Rhosne, where it entereth into the Mediterranean Sea; it is said here that it shall be in fear of a Barbarian Fleet, and after that of a Spanish one, and that both the Spaniard and the French shall have great losses in Cattle, People and Goods, and this shall happen when the Sun shall be in the Signs of Taurus and Libra.

XXIX.

French.

Quand le Poisson, Terrestre & Aquatique,
Par forte vague an gravier sera mis,
Sa forme estrange suave & horrifique,
Par Mer aux murs bien tost les Enemies.

English.

When the Fish that is both Terrestrial and Aquatick,
By a strong Wave shall be cast upon the Sand,
With his strange fearful sweet horrid form,
Soon after the enemies will come near to the Walls by Sea.

ANNOT.

This signifieth no more but that after, a Fish, Terrestrial and Aquatick, that is which, liveth in Land and Water, called by the Greeks αμφίβιον, shall be cast upon the Sand by a storm, then a little while after, that Town which lieth near to that place where the Fish was cast, shall be Besieged by her Enemies, who shall come by Sea.

XXX.

French.

La Nef estrange par le tourment Marin,
Abordera pres le Port incognu,
Nonobstant signs du rameau palmerin,
Apres mort, pille, bon advis tard venu.

English.

The Outlandish Ship by a Sea storm,
Shall come near the unknown Haven,
Notwitstanding the signs given to it with Bows,
It shall die, be plundered, a good advice come too late.

[22]

ANNOT.

It is a Forrein Ship which by a storm shall be driven to an unknown Harbour, and notwithstanding the signs that shall be made to it with Branches, by those that are upon the Land to beware of the entrance of the Harbour, it shall be cast away, and plundered; thus a good advice shall come too late.

XXXI.

French.

Tant d’ans les guerres, en Gaule dureront,
Outre la course du Castulon Monarque,
Victoire incerte trois grands couroneront,
Aigle, Coq, Lune, Lion Soleil en marque.

English.

So many years the Wars shall last in France,
Beyond the course of the Castulon Monarque,
An uncertain Victory three great ones shall Crown,
The Eagle, the Cock, the Moon, the Lion having the Sun in its mark.

ANNOT.

That is, the Wars shall last so long in France after the death of one King of Spain, till three great ones shall challenge an uncertain Victory, these three great ones are the Emperour designed by the Aigle, the King of France by the Cock, and the Turk by the Moon, and this shall happen when the Sun is in the sign of the Lion. I suppose that came to pass in the time of Charles the V. Henry the II. and Soliman. For the Turk had no great odds upon the Emperour, nor he upon the King of France.

XXXII.

French.

La grand Empire sera tost translaté,
En lieu petit qui bien tost viendra croistre,
Lieu bien infime d’exigue Comté,
Ou au milieu viendra poser son Scepter.

English.

The great Empire shall soon be translated,
Into a little place which shall soon grow afterwards.
An inferiour place of a small County,
In the middle of which he shall come to lay down his Scepter.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the same Charles the V. Emperour, who about three years before his death, being weary of the World, resigned his Dominions of Spain and of the[23] Low-Countries, to his Son Philip the II. and his Empire to his Brother Ferdinand, and retired himself into a Monastery of Castile, called l’Escurial, which after his death, was much enlarged and beautified by his Son Philip: and that is the meaning of our Author when he saith:

Into a little place which shall soon grow afterwards,
An inferiour place of a small County,

For this Escurial being seated in a Desert place of a County of Spain, called Castilia, which the Spanish vanity calleth a Kingdom, (whose Use, Fruit, or Revenues, the said Charles only reserved for his maintenance) is now by the Spaniards accounted to be the eighth wonder of the World.

XXXIII.

French.

Pres d’un grand Pont de plaine spacieuse,
Le grand Lion par force, Cesarées,
Fera abatre hors Cité rigoureuse,
Par effroy portes luy seront reserrées.

English.

A great Bridge near a spacious Plain,
The great Lion by Cæsarean Forces,
Shall cause to be pulled down, without the rigorous City,
For fear of which, the Gates shall be shut to him.

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that a great Captain, Commander of the Imperial Forces, shall cause a Bridge that was built near a spacious Plain to be thrown down. The City near the Bridge being terrified at it, shall shut up their Gates against him.

XXXIV.

French.

L’Oiseau de proye volant a la Fenestre,
Avant conflict, fait au Francois parure,
L’un bon prendra, l’autre ambigue sinistre,
La partie foible tiendra pour bonne augure.

English.

The Bird of Prey flying to the Window,
Before Battle, shall appear to the French;
One shall take a good omen of it, the other a bad one,
The weaker part shall hold it for a good sign.

ANNOT.

It is a Hawk which in presence of two Armies ready to give Battle, shall fly to a window and perch upon it, in the presence of them all, one of the Armies shall take[24] it for a good sign; and the other, for an ambiguous and sinister one. In Conclusion, the weaker party shall get the Victory.

XXXV.

French.

Le Lion jeune le vieux surmontera,
En champ bellique par singulier Duelle,
Dans Cage dor Lœil il lui crevera,
Deux playes une puis mourir mort cruelle.

English.

The young Lion shall overcome the old one,
In Martial field by a single Duel,
In a Golden Cage he shall put out his Eye,
Two wounds from one, then he shall die a cruel death.

ANNOT.

This is one of the Prophecies that hath put our Author in credit, as well for the clearness as for the true event of it.

Cæsar Nostradamus our Authors son, in his History of Provence, writeth that by this Stanza his father intended to foretell the manner of Henry the second’s death.

The French Histories relate that this great Prince desiring to honour the Nuptial of his Daughter Elizabeth, married to Philip II. King of Spain, did appoint a Tournament to be kept in St. Anthony’s street in Paris, where himself would be one of the Defendants against all comers, and for that purpose chose for his companions and associates Don Alfonso d’Este Duke of Ferrara, and Francis of Lorrain, Duke of Guise.

The Tornament being almost ended, in which the King had shewed much Valour being mounted upon a Horse of the Duke of Savoy, Philibert’s, Emanuel his Brother in Law, this Duke intreated the King to leave off, because he had got the Victory; and the weather was hot, and the night drawing on: But this Martial King would need break one Launce more, and commanded the Captain Gabriel de Lorges to be called, a young and valiant Lord and Captain of the Scottish Guard. Being come, the King commanded him to run against him, which he refused a great while; but the King waxing angry, he obeyed, and set Spurs to his Horse, he did hit the King in the lower part of his Beaver, the Launce was broken into shivers, and the mean stump lifting up the Beaver, a splinter got in, and wounded the King a little above the right Eye, where finding the Bone too hard, it went very deep under the said Eye, and broke some Veins belonging to the Membrane, called Pia Mater.

The blow was so violent that the King bended his head towards the lists, and fell, into a Swound, being presently disarmed, they perceived the splinter of the Launce in his Eye, and his face all bloody. He lived ten days after, and died with great Convulsions, because the Sinews were offended, whereupon he suffered grievous Torment.

His death was also foretold by Luke Gaurick a great Astrologer, who being constrained by the Queen Catharine of Medicis, to tell her by what kind of death her Husband should end his days, told her it should be in a Duel, which made him to be hissed at, Kings being exempted of those accidents.

[25]

According to this Narrative the Author calleth the King an old Lion, and the Captain Lorges, since Earl of Montgomery, the young Lion; because both fought like Lions. The young Lion overcame the old one in Martial field, and in a fight of one against one, and consequently a Duel.

He overcame him by putting his Eye out in a Golden Cage, that is, in his Gilded Helmet.

Of which Wound there came another, because the blood of some broken Veins, creeping into the Brains by the vehement agitation of the head, caused an Impostume there, which could not be remedied: therefore the Author saith two Wounds from one, that is, one wound made two: and the King died of a cruel death, as we have said before.

XXXVI.

French.

Tard le Monarque se viendra repentir,
De navoir mis a Mort son Adversaire,
Mais viendra bien a plus haut consentir,
Que tout son sang par Mort sera deffaire.

English.

The Monarque shall too late repent,
That he hath not put to death his Adversary;
But he shall give his consent to a greater thing than that,
Which is to put to death all his Adversaries Kindred.

ANNOT.

The words of this are plain, though it be questionable whether the thing is come to pass already, or not.

XXXVII.

French.

Un peu devant que le Soleil sabsconse,
Conflict donné, grand peuple dubieux,
Profligez, Port-Marin ne fait responce,
Pont & Sepulchre en deux estranges lieux.

English.

A little before the Sun setteth,
A Battle shall be given, a great people shall be doubtful,
Of being foiled, the Sea-Port maketh no answer,
A Bridge and Sepulchre shall be in two strange places.

ANNOT.

The two first verses I believe are concerning the Battle of Saint Denis, which was fought in the Evening hard by Paris, and where the Constable of Montmorency[26] was kill’d, which made that great people of Paris to be doubtful.

The other two Verses I leave to the interpretation of the Reader.

XXXVIII.

French.

Le Sol & l’Aigle Victeur paroistront,
Response vain au vaincu lon asseure,
Par Cor ne cris, harnois narresteront,
Vindicte paix, par Mort lacheve a l’heure.

English.

The Sun and the Eagle shall appear to the Victorious,
A vain Answer shall be made good to the vanquished,
By no means Arms shall not be stopped,
Vengeance maketh Peace, by death he then accomplisheth it.

ANNOT.

This Stanza being full of Figures and Equivoques, I will not interpose my Judgement in it, lest I undertake too much, and perform too little.

XXXIX.

French.

De nuit dans le lit le supresme estranglé,
Pour avoir trop suborné blond esleu,
Par trois l’Empire subroge Exancle,
A mort mettra, Carte ne Pacquet leu.

English.

By night in the bed the chief one shall be strangled.
For having too much suborned fair Elect,
By three the Empire subrogate Exancle,
He shall put him to death, reading neither Card nor Packet.

ANNOT.

The Author hath purposely obscured this Prophecie in the third Verse, to take away the Knowledge of it from the Reader; because the parties concerned were then alive, viz. Philip II. King of Spain, who caused his only son Don Carlo to be strangled in his bed, for suspicion of being too familiar with his wife Elizabeth of France, and Daughter to Henry II. The last Verse saith, that he was so implacable, that he would read neither Card nor Packet, that is, no requests.

[27]

XL.

French.

La tourbe fausse dissimilant folie,
Fera Bizance un changement de loix,
Istra d’Ægypt qui veus que l’on deslie,
Edict, changant Monnoys & alloys.

English.

The false Troup dissembling their folly,
Shall make in Bizance an alteration of Laws.
One shall come out of Ægypt who will have untied
The Edict, changing the Coin and allay.

ANNOT.

There is two things in this Prognostication, the first that in Bizance, which is Constantinople, a Troop of tumultuous persons gathered together, and dissembling their folly, shall cause an alteration in the Laws.

The other, that some Bassa come out of Ægypt, shall perswade them at Constantinople to alter their Coin, and the allay of it.

XLI.

French.

Siege a Cité & de nuit assaille,
Peu eschapez non loing de Mer conflict,
Femme de joye, retour fils, de faillie,
Poison & Lettres caché dedans le plie.

English.

A Siege laid to a City, and assaulted by night,
Few escaped, a fight not far from the Sea,
A woman swoundeth for joy to see her son returned;
A poison hidden in the fold of Letters.

ANNOT.

After the taking of Vulpian, the French came to Montcalvo, and in the night surprized it by Scalado, and Paradin saith, that not a drop of Blood was shed on either side.

The Town being taken, the Citadel did hold out a good while, and at last did surrender, Don Arbre, who was in the place of the Marques of Pescaire, and of the Duke of d’Alva, knowing that the besieged had not made a sufficient resistance, caused the Captain, and eleven more of the chief ones to be hanged; because the place was of consequence, and those within had not made a sufficient resistance.

The Author saith in the first Verse, Siege was laid to a City, that is, it was resolved to besiege Montcalvo, as the Martial of Brissac had advised. In the execution it was assaulted by night, in the taking few escaped; for they were all taken,[28] and yielded to the Victorious. There were none killed or wounded, all were taken, except few who ran away, and carried the news to the Spaniards.

At the same time a fight not far from the Sea, that is, at the same time there was another Battle by the Sea, between the Spaniards and the Pope, as we shall shew hereafter.

The third and fourth Verses are concerning a particular accident, which happened presently after the taking of Montcalvo, which is, that a woman seeing her Son come back safe, fell in a swound, or died for joy, because knowing the danger wherein he was, she had lost all hopes of ever seeing him. This fellow had brought Poison in a Letter to give to one that had not rewarded him according to his desire. His wickedness being discovered, his Master put him in Prison, whence he escaped, and came back again to Montcalvo; the Author speaketh of the same in another place, which we shall set down in its order.

XLII.

French.

Les dix Calendes d’Avril de fait Gothique,
Resuscité encor par gens malins,
Le feu estaint, assemblée Diabolique,
Cherchant les Os de Damant & Psellin.

English.

The tenth of the Calends of April, Gothik account,
Raised up again by malitious persons,
The fire put out, a Diabolical assembly,
Shall seek for the Bones of Damant and Psellin.

ANNOT.

The tenth of the Calends of April is the 23. of March, Gothik account signifieth the old account of the Calendar, before the reformation of it by Pope Gregory the XIII. which old account is called here Gothik, because it is kept still by the Northern Nations, which do not acknowledge the Pope, as Sweden, Denmark, Holland, England, &c. at that time saith our Author, a Magician shall be raised up by malitious persons; which fire or tumult being put out, that Diabolical assembly will go about to seek the bones of two famous Magicians, viz. Damant and Psellin that were dead before.

XLIII.

French.

Avant qu’aviene le changement d’Empire,
Il adviendra un cas bien merveilleux,
Le Champ mué, le Pilier de Porphyre,
Mis, translaté sur le Rocher Noileux.
[29]

English.

Before the change of the Empire cometh,
There shall happen a strange accident,
A field shall be changed, and a Pillar of Prophyry,
Shall be transported upon the Chalky Rock.

ANNOT.

This will not seem incredible to those that have read the English Chronicles, who relates that in a County of England (I think it is Herefordshire) there was an Earthquake, which transposed a large piece of ground in another place, with the Trees that were in it, and if I remember well, half a Chappel, those that have the Books may examine the truth of the History, and satisfie themselves better.

XLIV.

French.

En bref seront de retour Sacrifices,
Contrevenans seront mis a Martyre,
Plus ne seront Moins, Abbez ne Novices,
Le Miel sera beaucoup plus cher que Cire.

English.

Within a little while Sacrifices shall come again,
Opposers shall be put to Martyrdom;
There shall be no more Monks, Abbots, nor Novices,
Honey shall be much dearer then Wax.

ANNOT.

This is a true Prophecy of the miserable condition of the Church and Clergy in our Fore-fathers times, and chiefly of Henry the II. in France, and Henry the VIII. in England, when in the beginning of the Reformation there was such a confusion of opinions, and such unsettledness in Ecclesiastical Government, that sometimes the Popish party prevailed, and put to death the Opposers; at another time the Protestants, who drove away the Monks, Abbots and Novices, as is expressed here, and proved true in Henry the VIII. time. As for what he saith, that Honey shall be much dearer than Wax. It is to be understood of the downfal of the Romish Religion, who maketh use of Wax Candles and Tapers in their superstitious ceremonies, as if he would say, that the Romish Religion being down, Wax shall be cheap, and Honey dear.

XLV.

French.

Secteur de Sectes, grand paine au Delateur,
Beste en Theatre, dresse le jeu Scenique,
Du fait antique ennobly l’Inventeur,
Par Sectes, Monde confus & Schismatique.
[30]

English.

Follower of Sects, great troubles to the Messenger,
A Beast upon the Theatre prepareth the Scenical play,
The Inventor of that wicked fact shall be famous,
By Sects the World shall be confounded and Schismatik.

ANNOT.

The Author being a Papist, is probable that in this Prophecy he aimed at Luther, after whose coming the world hath been full of Sects and Schisms.

XLVI.

French.

Tout aupres d’Auch, de Lectoure & Mirande,
Grand feu du Ciel en trois nuits tombera,
Chose adviendra bien stupende & mirande,
Bien peu apres la Terre tremblera.

English.

Near Auch, Lectoure and Mirande,
A great fire from Heaven shall fall three nights together,
A thing shall happen stupendious and wonderful,
A little while after, the Earth shall quake.

ANNOT.

Auch, Lectoure and Miranda are three Towns in Guyenna, a Province of France, the chief City whereof is Bourdeaux. The rest is easie.

XLVII.

French.

Du Lac Leman les Sermons fascheront,
Des jours seront reduits par des Sepmaines,
Puis mois, puis an, puis tous defalliront,
Les Magistrats damneront leurs Loix vaines.

English.

The Sermons of the Leman Lake shall be troublesome,
Some days shall be reduced into weeks,
Then into months, then into year, then they shall fail,
The Magistrates shall condemn their vain Laws.

[31]

ANNOT.

The Leman Lake, in Latin Lacus Lemanus, is the Lake of Geneva, therefore it is palpable, that by this Prophecy, the Author aimeth at Calvin, and his Successors, who began the Reformation in that Town. I leave the rest to the Readers Judgement, it is enough I have opened the door.

XLVIII.

French.

Vingt ans du Regne de la Lune passez,
Sept mil ans autre tiendra sa Monarchie,
Quand le Soleil prendra ses jours laissez,
Lors accomplit & fine ma Prophecie.

English.

Twenty years of the Reign of the Moon being past,
Seven thousands years another shall hold his Monarchy,
When the Sun shall reassume his days past,
Then is fulfilled, and endeth my Prophecy.

ANNOT.

All this signifieth no more, but that the Authors Prophecies extend to the end of the world.

XLIX.

French.

Beaucoup, beaucoup avant relics menées,
Ceux d’Orient par la vertu Lunaire,
L’An mil sept cens feront grands emmenées,
Subjugant presque le coin Aquilonaire.

English.

A great while before these doings,
Those of the East by the virtue of the Moon,
In the year 1700. shall carry away great droves,
And shall subdue almost the whole Northern corner.

ANNOT.

I desire Posterity to take special notice of this Stanza, that in case it should come to pass, our Author may be admired for the specification of the time, which is so punctually set down, here that it admitteth no ambiguity. The plain meaning is, that the Turks, which he calleth those of the East. By the virtue of the Moon, which is their Ensign and Badge, shall in the year 1700. carry away abundance of people, and shall subdue almost the whole Northern Countrey, which to them is Russia, Poland, Hungary, Sweden, Denemark, &c.

[32]

L.

French.

De l’Aquatique triplicity naistra,
Un qui fera le Jeudy pour sa feste,
Son Bruit, Loz, Regne & puissance croistra,
Par Terre & Mer, aux Orients tempeste.

English.

From the Aquatick triplicity shall be born,
One that shall make Thursday his Holiday,
His Fame, Praise, Reign, and Power shall grow,
By Land and Sea, and a Tempest to the East.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that at that time, as such conjunction of Planets shall be, which he calleth here Aquatick triplicity, there shall be born upon a Thursday a famous man, such as he describeth here, who shall be a foe and a terrour to the Turks, signified here by the Orients.

LI.

French.

Chef d’Aries, Jupiter & Saturne,
Dieu Eternel quelles mutations!
Puis apres long siecle son malin temps retourne,
Gaule & Italy quelles emotions?

English.

Heads of Aries, Jupiter and Saturn,
O Eternal God, what changes shall there be!
After a long age his wicked time cometh again,
France and Italy, what commotions?

ANNOT.

This signifieth, that when Jupiter and Saturn shall be in conjunction in the head of Aries, that then shall be great commotions in France and Italy.

LII.

French.

Le deux malins de Scorpion conjoint,
Le grand Seigneur meurtry dedans sa salle,
Peste a l’Eglise par le nouveau Roy joint,
L’Europe basse, & Septentrionale.
[33]

English.

The two malignants of Scorpion being joyned,
The grand Seignor murdered in his Hall,
Plague to the Church by a King newly joyned to it,
Europe low, and Septentrional.

ANNOT.

This third position of the Celestial bodies foretelleth the death of the great Turk, who should be murdered in his own Chamber, as happened to Sultan Osman, who was strangled in his Chamber, by the command of Daout Bassa great Vizeir, about the year 1622. vide the Turkish History.

The rest of the Prophecy is concerning a King, who being newly joyned to the Church, (I suppose of Rome) shall bring much mischief to it, and in his time Europe shall be brought very low, and in a manner confined to a corner of the North, which hath relation to the foregoing 49. Stanza, which see in its place.

LIII.

French.

Las, qu’on verra grand peuple tourmenté,
Et la Loy Sainte en totale ruine,
Par autres Loix toute la Chrestienté,
Quand d’Or, d’Argent trouve nouvelle Mine.

English.

Alas, how a great people shall be tormented,
And the Holy Law in an utter ruine;
By other Laws, all Christendom troubled,
When new Mines of Gold and Silver shall be found.

ANNOT.

This is a true Prophecy of the mischiefs that have happened in the World by the finding of the Mines in America; first to the Indians themselves, called here a great People, by the cruelty of the Spaniards, and then to all Christendom besides, by the evils that this Idol Mammon hath brought into it.

LIV.

French.

Deux revolts faits du malin facigere,
De Regne & Siecles fait permutation,
Le mobil signe a son endroit s’Ingere,
Aux deux egaux & d’Inclination.
[34]

English.

Two revolts shall be made by the wicked Link-carrier,
Which shall make a change of the Reign and the Age,
The moveable Sign doth offer it self for it,
To the two equals in inclination.

ANNOT.

This obscure Stanza must be interpreted thus.

Two revolts shall be made by the wicked Link-carrier; that is, Paris which is the Link-carrier of France, and whose example the rest of the Towns follow, shall revolt twice, the first revolt was against Henry III. in the time of the Barricadoes, the second against Henry IV. his successor.

Which shall make a change of the Reign and the Age: This happened when the house of Valois was extinguished, and the house of Bourbon came in, and that is the change of the Reign. The change of the Age, was, because this did happen about the end of the year 1599. and the beginning 1600. which was a change of Age.

The moveable sign offers it self for it: That is, the position of the Heavens was such as to forward these accidents.

To the two equals in ambition: That is, to Henry III. and Henry IV. who both intended, and went about to reduce Paris to obedience.

LV.

French.

Soubs lopposite climat Babilonique,
Grande sera de sang effusion,
Que Terre, & Mer, Air, Ciel sera inique,
Sectes, Faim, Regnes, Pestes, Confusion.

English.

In the Climat opposite to the Babylonian,
There shall be a great effusion of Blood.
Insomuch that the Land, and Sea, Air and Heaven shall seem unjust
Sects, Famine, Reigns, Plague, Confusion.

ANNOT.

There is nothing difficult here, but what Climat is that is opposite to the Babylonian, of which every body may satisfie himself by perusing the Globe.

LVI.

French.

Vous verrez tost on tard faire grand change,
Horreurs extremes & vindications,
Que si la Lune conduite par son Ange,
Le Ciel sapproche des inclinations.
[35]

English.

You shall see soon or late great alterations
Extreme horrours and revenges,
The Moon leaden by her Angel,
The Heaven draweth near its inclinations.

ANNOT.

I conceive there is some things omitted, and corrupted by the Press in this Stanza, which rendreth it so difficult, therefore I had rather leave it to the decision of the impartial Reader, than venture my opinion upon it.

LVII.

French.

Par grand discord la trombe tremblera,
Accord rompu, dressant la teste au Ciel,
Bouche sanglante dans le sang nagera,
Au Sol la face ointe le loit & Miel.

English.

By great discord, the Trumpet shall sound,
Agreement broken, lifting the head to Heaven,
A bloody mouth shall swim in blood,
The face turned to the Sun anointed with Milk and Honey.

ANNOT.

The words and sence are plain, and I cannot believe that there is any great mystery hidden under these words.

LVIII.

French.

Trenché le ventre, naistra avec deux testes,
& quattre bras, quel qu’ans entiers vivra,
Jour qu’Aquilare celebrera ses festes,
Fossan, Thurin, chef Ferrare fuiera.

English.

Slit in the belly, shall be born with two heads,
And four Arms, it shall live some years,
The day that Aquilare shall celebrate his Festivals,
Fossan, Thurin, chief Ferrare shall run away.

[36]

ANNOT.

In the first Verse the Author speaketh of a Monster that had two heads, and four Arms, and the Belly slit, that is to say, it was a female.

His Son Cæsar in his History of Provence, saith, that in the Town of Senan in Provence, a Child was born with two heads, and that it was foretold by some that were skilful in Astronomy, by which words I guess he spake of his Father, sith the Astrologers cannot foretel the birth of a particular Monster, and therefore Nostradamus only was able to do it in those days.

He saith in the same place, that it was born in February 1554. and was brought to Salon to be shewed to his Father, and thence was carried to Claudius Earl of Savoy Governour of Provence, who commonly had his residence at Salon.

He maketh no mention if he had four Arms, nor what Sex it was of, it may be that being in swadling cloths, nobody took notice of the Arms or Sex.

The Author Prophecieth that it should live some years, it may be two or three, and that is was preserved to see, whether in time it should have the use of its Senses, of the Tongue, and understanding of its two Heads, to see whether there were two Souls, or onely one, and to say the Truth. I think that in such an accident both Heads ought to be Baptized, that in case there should be two Souls, both should partake of the blood of Christ, for their Eternal Salvation.

I do not find in the same History how long it lived, it being a thing not much material to History. In the third Verse he marketh, The day that Aquilare shall celebrate his Festivals; and in the fourth he saith that Fossan, Thurin, chief Ferrare shall run away.

To understand this, one must suppose here that the Town of Cazal is called here the chief of Ferrare; because it is the chief City of Montserrat, and as Paradin saith, is called Cazal St. Bas, a handsom and strong place, honoured with many Nobles and antient Families, as of the Earls of St. George and of Biandratte.

Secondly, We must suppose that in the year 1554. the Lord Figuerol, Lieutenant to the Governour of Milan did command in that place. Of this Figuerol I find in the Author of the four Volumes of the States and Empires, (when he speaketh of Spain) that the House of Figueroas was the root of that of Aquilar, which hath several branches, out of which came the Duke of Feria, and the Marquess of Pliego, so that Figuerol and Aquilar is the same thing.

If it be objected that Figueroas and Figuerol are not the same, Paradin teacheth us, that this Figuerol was bred up amongst the Genoeses, and the corrupted Italian of Genoa may have named the Captain Figuerol in stead of Figueroas.

Thirdly, We must suppose here that Cazal was taken in the night that is between Shrove-Tuesday and Ash-Wednesday, and that from Shrove-Sunday to that day there were great rejoycings, because of a famous Marriage that was made between two persons of quality, where the Lord Figuerol was one of the chief persons invited.

Fourthly, That these rejoycings were the occasion of the taking of Cazal; because the Lord Salvaison Governour of Verrüe hearing of this Feast, resolved to be among them, though with a different intention. He had before hand made himself sure of one Fontarole, who under pretence to sell fruit, went up and down the Town to spie what was a doing.

Fifthly, The resolution of surprizing Cazal was agreed upon, and the time appointed to be the night between Shrove-Tuesday and Ash-Wednesday, when the Governour, Inhabitants and Souldiers should be buried in sleep, weary of debaucheries committed the day before.

Sixthly, This resolution was so happily put into execution, that Figuerol hearing[37] the noise of the French being in Town, came out of his house, having only his night Gown upon him, and a Halbert in his hand, to quiet those whom he only thought to be some drunken persons; but hearing the cry of France, France, he presently retired into the Castle, with all those that were come to the Nuptials.

Seventhly, The Marshal of Brissac coming about seven of the Clock in the Morning, caused the Tower of Cazal to be assaulted, which was taken with a considerable loss of the French, and after that the Castle which held out 12 days.

All this being supposed, mark what the Author saith in the third Verse.

The day that Aquilare shall celebrate his Festivals, that is, the day that Figuerol of the house of Aquilare shall celebrate his Festivals, not only one Festival, but his Festivals, that is of three days.

Fossen, Thurin, saith the fourth Verse, Chief Ferrare shall run away.

Fossen, Thurin, doth not signifie two Towns, but one onely; for although Fossen and Thurin be two Towns, of which Fossen in the time of the Wars in Italy under Henry II. belonged to the Spaniard, and Thurin to the French. These two Towns signifie but one, which is that of Fossen, to which to distinguish it from Marseilles, he giveth the Epithete of Thurin, so much as to say, that he speaketh of Fossen a Town of Piemont, the chief Town of which is Thurin, and not of Fossen, which the Author taketh often for Marseilles.

Which the Author maketh plain, when he saith in the singular number, that Fossen, Thurin, chief Ferrare shall run away, to shew that it is onely one Town of which he speaketh, otherwise if he had intended to speake of two, he would have put it in the plural number, which is more manifest by the History, wherein we learn that Fossen belonged to the Spaniards, and Thurin to the French, and consequently, being of contrary parties, they could neither follow, nor fly from a Town which belonged to one of them.

If any one should object, that the sense of the fourth Verse is, that the Chief Ferrare shall fly or follow these two Towns, the preceding reason is repugnant to that sense; because a Town that is of one party, cannot be friend to two Towns, one of which is of its party, and the other of the contrary.

The reading of this work shall convince every body, that the Author setteth down sometimes two Towns for one, to distinguish them from others, as he nameth Paul Mansol, to distinguish that Town of St. Paul, which is three Leagues from the Rhosne, over against Pont St. Esprit, from that St. Paul which is in Provence.

Now that Fossen in Piemont shall run from Cazal the chief City of Montserrat, because that being taken by the French, Fossen could not expect but perpetual damages from it.

But why? will you say, doth the Author speak rather of Fossen, than of other places that held for the Spaniards? I answer, because Fossen was the strongest place that the Spaniards had in Piemont and which could not be taken by the French, though her neighbour Saviliane was, as we shall shew hereafter.

In the Vulgar impression of this Stanza, there is two faults, one is, that in the first Verse it puts Aquileya, which is a Town that is not in Italy, truth it is, that there is Aquilee a little above Venice, but this hath no correspondency with Fossen, Thurin, nor the Chief of Ferrara.

In the fourth Verse the impression setteth down shall follow, which maketh nonsense, and therefore I put shall run away, which is a word in French near the other, and maketh a compleat sense, to which agreeth the birth of that Monster in February, and the taking of Cazal in the Month of March. In that year, John Statius setteth Shrove-Tuesday upon the 16 of February, and consequently we must say, that the Town was not taken that year 1554. for the Citadel was taken 12 days after, which should have been the 19 of February, and notwithstanding the History marks that it was taken upon the 14 of March.

[38]

Therefore we must conclude, that it was taken the year following 1555. and to say truth, in that year Ash-wednesday was the 27. of February; in that day the Town was taken, and two days after the Tower of Cazal; after which the Citadel was besieged the second of March, and the first Saturday of Lent, and was taken twelve days after, which was the 14. of March, which convinceth me that Cazal was taken in the year 1555. upon the 27. of February, and therefore that this Stanza is wholly Prophetical.

LIX.

French.

Les exilez deportez dans les Isles,
Au changement d’un plus cruel Monarque,
Seront meurtris & mis dans les Scintilles,
Qui de parler ne seront este parques.

English.

They banished that were carried into the Islands,
At the change of a more cruel Monarque,
Shall be murdered, and put in the sparks of fire,
Because they had not been sparing of their tongues.

ANNOT.

This is very plain, and signifieth no more, but that some persons that were banished into Islands, and could not hold their tongues; upon the coming of a Monarque, more cruel than his Predecessor, shall be murdered, and burnt.

LX.

French.

Un Empereur naistra pres d’Italie,
Qui a l’Empire sera vendu bien cher,
Diront avec quels gens il se ralie,
Qu’on trouvera moins Prince que Boucher.

English.

An Emperour shall be born near Italy,
Who shall cost dear to the Empire,
They shall say, what people he keepeth company!
He shall be found less a Prince, than a Butcher.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is for the future; for since Nostradamus’s time till now, such an Emperour was not heard of, that was born near Italy, that cost the Empire so dear, and proved more a Butcher, than a Prince.

[39]

LXI.

French.

La Republique miserable infelice,
Sera vastée du nouveau Magistrat,
Leur grand amas de l’exil malefice,
Fera Suede ravir leur grand contract.

English.

The miserable and unhappy Common-wealth,
Shall be wafted by the new Magistrate;
Their great gathering from exiled persons,
Shall cause Swedeland to break her Contract.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses foretell what hath happened to England under the Government of a Common-wealth, and how their new Magistrate Cromwel made a havock of them. The third and fourth Verses, mention what great sums they exacted from those of the Kings party, and how for that cause Swedeland foresook their friendship.

LXII.

French.

La grande perte las que feront les Lettres,
Avant le Circle de Latona parfait,
Feu, grand Deluge, plus par ignares Sceptres,
Que de long siecle ne se verra refait.

English.

Alas what a great loss shall learning suffer,
Before the Circle of the Moon be accomplished,
Fire, great flood, and more by ignorant Scepters,
Then can be made good again in a long age.

ANNOT.

Here the Author bemoaneth the loss of one eminent person in Learning, be like of Julius Scaliger, who lived in his time, and was once his intimate friend, the two last Verses that great miseries, as Fire and Flood shall happen by the ignorance of Princes.

LXIII.

French.

Les Fleaux passez, diminué le Monde,
Long temps la Paix, Terres inhabitées,
Seur marchera par le Ciel, Terre, Mer & Onde,
Puis de nouveau les Guerres suscitées.
[40]

English.

The Scourges being past, the World shall be diminished,
Peace for a great while, Lands inhabited,
Every one safe shall go by Heaven, Land and Sea,
And then the Wars shall begin a fresh.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth a great tranquillity every where, and after that, Wars again:

LXIV.

French.

De nuit Soleil penseront avoir veu,
Quand le Pourceau demy homme on verra,
Bruit, Chant, Bataille au Ciel battre apperceu,
Et bestes brutes a parler on orra.

English.

They shall think to have seen the Sun in the night,
When the Hog half a man shall be seen,
Noise, Singing, Battles in Heaven shall be seen to fight,
And brute beasts shall be heard to speak.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is full of prodigies that are to happen, and for that in the last Verse, it is no great wonder, for many brute beasts have spoken, speak now a days, and shall speak hereafter.

LXV.

French.

Enfant sans mains, jamais veu si grand Foudre,
L’Enfant Royal au jeu d’esteuf blessé,
Au puy brisez, fulgures allant moudre,
Trois sur les champs par le milieu troussez.

English.

A child without hands, so great Lightning never seen,
The Royal Child wounded at Tennis,
Bruised at the Well, Lightnings, going to grind,
Three shall be strucken by the middle.

[41]

ANNOT.

The meaning of all this is, that when a child shall be born without hands, there shall be fearful Lightning; a Royal child shall be hurt at Tennes, and by that Lightning some shall be bruised by a Well, and in a Mill, and three in the Field shall be killed.

LXVI.

French.

Celuy qui lors portera les nouvelles,
Apres un peu il viendra respirer,
Viviers, Tournon, Montferrand & Pradelles,
Gresle & tempeste les fera souspirer.

English.

He that then shall carry the news,
A little while after shall draw his breath,
Viviers, Tournon, Montferrant, and Pradelles,
Hail and storm shall make them sigh.

ANNOT.

This Stanza hath a connexion with the foregoing, for the two first Verses signifie, that he who shall carry the news of that fearful Lightning, and of the mischief done by it, shall have much ado to recover his breath.

In the last two Verses, the Towns are named which shall suffer most by that storm, and chiefly by the Hail and the Wind.

LXVII.

French.

La grand famine que je vois approcher,
Souvent tourner puis estre universelle,
Si grande & longue qu’on viendra arracher,
Du Bois racine, & l’Enfant de mamelle.

English.

What a great famine do I see drawing near,
To turn one way, then another, and then become universal,
So great and long, that they shall come to pluck
The root from the Wood, and the child from the breast.

ANNOT.

The words and sense of this are plain, and foretell a great famine, which being first in one Countrey and then in another, shall at last become general, and last so long, that people shall pluck the Roots from the Trees, and the children from the breast to feed upon.

[42]

LXVIII.

French.

O quel horrible & malheureux tourment,
Trois innocens qu’on viendra a livrer,
Poison suspect, mal garde tradiment.
Mis en horreur par Bourreaux enyvrez.

English.

O to what a horrid and unhappy torment
Shall be put three Innocents!
Poison shall be suspected, evil Keepers shall betray them,
They shall be put to horrour by drunken Executioners.

ANNOT.

This is very plain concerning three innocent persons, who shall be delivered up by their unfaithful keepers, and shall be put to great torments by drunken Executioners, which torments shall be suspected to come by poison.

LXIX.

French.

La grand Montagne ronde de sept Stades,
Apres Paix, Guerre, Faim, Inondation,
Roulera loing, abisuant grand contrades,
Mesmes antiques, & grand Fondation.

English.

The great Mount in compass seven Stades,
After Peace, War, Famine, and Innundation,
Shall tumble a great way, sinking great Countries,
Yea ancient Buildings, and great Foundation.

ANNOT.

A Stade cometh from the Greek word σταδιον, ἀπὸ τῆς στασεος, because Hercules did overrun so much ground at one breath; but what space of ground the Author meaneth by seven Stades, is unknown to me. The rest of the Prophecy may very well be appropriated to the last fearful eruption of Mount Ætna, which sunk so many Towns and Buildings, and the relation of which is so handsomly and truly made by the most honourable the Earl of Winchelsey, who was an eye witness to it, in his return from his Embassy at Constantinople.

[43]

LXX.

French.

Pluye, Faim, Guerre en Perse non cessée,
La foy trop grande trahira le Monarque;
Par la finie en Gaule commencée,
Secret augure pour a un estre parque.

English.

The Rain, Famine, War, in Persia being not ceased,
Too great credulity shall betray the Monarque;
Being ended there it shall begin in France,
A secret Omen to one that he shall die.

ANNOT.

The meaning of the two first Verses, is, that while the Rain, Famine, and War shall be in Persia, a Monarque shall be betrayed by his credulity. The third Verse signifieth that this Rain, Famine and War being ended in Persia, it shall begin in France. And the fourth Verse, that this shall be an Omen to a great Person of his approaching death.

LXXI.

French.

La Tour Marine troisfois prise & reprise,
Par Espagnols, Barbares, Ligurins,
Marseille & Aix, Arles par ceux de Pise,
Vast, feu, fer, pille, Avignon des Thurins.

English.

The Sea-tower three times taken and retaken,
By Spaniards, Barbarians, and Ligurians,
Marseilles and Aix, Arles by those of Pisa,
Wast, fire, Iron, plunder, Avignon of Thurins.

ANNOT.

It is hard to guess what this Sea Tower is, which was taken and retaken three times; first by the Spaniards, next by the Barbarians, and then by the Ligurians, that is, either the Genoeses, or those of Ligorne, unless he meaneth the Pignon de Velez in Africa, first taken by Charles the V. upon the Barbarians, then retaken again by them, taken again by the Spaniards, by the help of the Genoeses. In the third Verse Marseille, Aix, and Arles, are threatned by those of Pisa, that is the Florentines, of being ruinated by Fire and Sword, and to be plundered, as also Avignon by those of Piemont.

[44]

LXXII.

French.

Du tout Marseille des habitans changee,
Course & poursuite jusques pres de Lion,
Narbon, Tholoze par Bourdeaux outragée,
Tuez, Captifs presque d’un Milion.

English.

Marseille shall wholly change her Inhabitants
These shall run and be pursued as far as Lion,
Narbon, Tholoze shall wrong Bourdeaux,
There shall be killed and taken prisoner almost a Milion.

ANNOT.

Marseilles is a Sea-Town in Provence, Narbon, and Tholoze are Cities of Languedoc, and Bourdeaux is the chief Town in Gascony, the rest is easie to be understood.

LXXIII.

French.

France a cinq parts par neglect assaillie,
Tunis, Argier, esmeus par Persiens,
Leon, Seville, Barcelonne faillie,
N’aura la chasse par les Venetiens.

English.

France by a neglect shall be assaulted on five sides,
Tunis, Argier shall be moved by the Persians,
Leon, Sevil, Barcelone shall be missed,
And not be pursued by the Venetians.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is concerning as many Countreys, as there are Verses: the first is France, which by neglect and carelesness of her in Inhabitants, shall be assaulted on five several sides. The second is concerning Tunis and Argier, Cities of Barbary, which shall be stirred and moved (I suppose) to rebel. The third regardeth Leon, Sevil, Barselona, Cities in Spain, and the fourth the Venetians.

LXXIV.

French.

Apres sejourné vogueront en Empire,
Le grand secours viendra vers Antioche,
Le noir poil crespe tendra fort a l’Empire,
Barbe d’Airain se rostira en broche.
[45]

English.

After a stay, they shall Sail towards an Empire,
The great succours shall come towards Antioch,
The Black Hair Curled, shall aim much to the Empire,
The Brazen Beard shall be roasted on a Spit.

ANNOT.

There is no difficulty in this, but in the last Verse, which I had rather leave to the judgment of the judicious Reader, than to offer any thing that might make me ridiculous.

LXXV.

French.

Le Tyran Sienne occupera Savone,
Le fort gaigné tiendra classe Marine,
Les deux Armées par la marque d’Ancone,
Par effrayeur le chef sen examine.

English.

The Tyrant Sienna shall occupy Savona;
The Fort being won, shall hold a Fleet,
The two Armies shall go in the mark of Ancona,
By fear the chief shall be examined.

ANNOT.

For the explication of this Stanza, you must understand that Sienna is a City in Italy, now under the Dominion of the Duke of Tuscany, who shall occupy Savona, a City now under the Dominion of the Common-wealth of Genoa; the rest is plain enough.

LXXVI.

French.

D’un nom farouche tel proferé sera.
Que les trois Sœurs auront Fato le nom,
Puis grand peuple par langue & fait dira,
Plus que nul autre aura bruit & renom.

English.

By a wild name one shall be called
So that the three Sisters shall have the name of Fato,
Afterwards a great people by Tongue and Deeds, shall say,
He shall have fame and renown more than any other.

[46]

ANNOT.

By the three Sisters, he meaneth the three Destinies, viz. Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos, which the Poets have fained to Spin every mans destiny, which he calleth here Fato, from the Latin word Fatum. The rest may be interpreted as well by the Reader, as by my self.

LXXVII.

French.

Entre deux Mers dressera promontoire,
Qui puis mourra par le mors du Cheval,
Le fier Neptune pliera Voile noire,
Par Calpre, & Classe aupres de Rocheval.

English.

Between two Seas shall a Promontory be raised,
By him, who shall die by the biting of a Horse,
The proud Neptune shall fold the black Sail.
Through Calpre, and a fleet shall be near Rocheval.

ANNOT.

I could not find what he meaneth by Calpre, nor by Rocheval, which I suppose to be the proper names of places, when he saith, that proud Neptune shall fold the black Sail; he maketh an allusion to the History of Theseus, Son of Ægeus King of Athens, who being sent with other Children into Candia, to become a prey to the Minotaure, his Father sent the Ship with black Sails, as in a case of Mourning, charging Theseus, that if he came back again safe he should put on white Sails, but coming in sight of Athens, Theseus for joy forgot to put on the white Sails, so that his Father Ægeus thinking he had miscarried, cast himself from a Rock into the Sea, so that he saying that Neptune shall fold the black Sail, he meaneth, that there shall be joyful news.

LXXVIII.

French.

D’un chef vieillard naistre sens habeté,
Degenerant par scavoir & par Armes,
Le chef de France par sa Sœur redouté,
Champs divisez concedez aux Gensdarmes.

English.

An old head shall beget an Idiot,
Who shall degenerate in Learning and in Arms,
The head of France shall be feared by his sister,
The fields shall be divided and granted to the Troopers.

[47]

ANNOT.

The sense of this is so plain, that any body may make his interpretation of it.

LXXIX.

French.

Bazas, L’Estoure, Condom, Auch, Agine,
Esmeus par Loix, querelle & Monopole,
Car Bourd, Tholose, Bay, mettra en ruine,
Renouveler voulant leur Tauropole.

English.

Bazas, L’Estoure, Condom, Auch, Agen,
Being moved by Laws, quarrels and Monopoly,
For they shall put to ruine Bordeaux, Tholose, Bayonne,
Going about to renew their Tauropole.

ANNOT.

This Key of the sense of this Stanza lieth in the last word Tauropole, which is compounded of the Latin word Taurus a Bull, and of the Greek word πολέω, that is, to sell; so that the meaning of it is, that those Cities mentioned shall rise in Rebellion against the Monopolites, and those that shall lay a Tax upon Cattle.

LXXX.

French.

De la sixiesme claire splendeur Celeste,
Viendra Tonnerre si fort en la Bourgongne,
Puis naistra monstre de treshideuse beste,
Mars, Avril, May, Juin, grand charpin & rogne.

English.

From the sixth bright Cœlestial splendour,
Shall come very great Lightning in Burgundy,
After that shall be born a Monster of a most hideous beast,
In March, April, May, June shall be great quarelling and muttering.

ANNOT.

The first Verse is of a most dark and abstruse sense, in which I confess my ignorance, unless he meant from the sixth of the seven Planets, the rest is plain enough.

[48]

LXXXI.

French.

D’humain troupeau neuf seront mis a part,
De Jugement & Conseil separez,
Leur sort sera divisé en depart,
Kappa, Theta, Lambda, mors, bannis egarez.

English.

Nine shall be set aside from the human flock,
Being divided in Judgement and Counsel
Their fortune shall be to be divided,
Kappa, Theta, Lambda, dead, banished, scattered.

ANNOT.

There is nothing difficult here, but what he meaneth by Kappa, Theta, Lambda, which are three Letters of the Greek Alphabet.

LXXXII.

French.

Quand les Colomnes de Bois grande tremblée,
D’Auster conduite, couverte de rubriche,
Tant videra dehors grande assemblée,
Tremble Vienne, & le Païs d’Austriche.

English.

When the wooden Columns shall be much shaken,
By Auster, and covered with rubbish,
Then shall go out a great assembly,
And Vienne, and the Land of Austria shall tremble.

ANNOT.

Auster, in Latin is the Southwind. Vienna is the chief City of Austria, belonging to the Emperour of Germany.

LXXXIII.

French.

L’Agent estrange divisera butins,
Saturne & Mars son regard furieux,
Horrible, estrange, aux Thoscans & Latins,
Grees qui seront a frapper curiux.
[49]

English.

The stranger Agent shall divide booties,
Saturn in Mars shall have his aspect furious,
Horrid, and strange to the Tuscans and Latines,
The Grecians shall be curious to strike.

ANNOT.

By the Tuscans are meant the people under the Dominion of the Duke of Florence; and by the Latines, those under the Pope.

LXXXIV.

French.

Lune obscurie aux profondes tenebres,
Son frere passe de couleur ferrugine,
Le grand caché long temps soubs les tenebres,
Tiedera Fer dans la Pluie sanguine.

English.

The Moon shall be darkned in the deepest darkness,
Her brother shall pass being of a ferrugineous colour,
The great one long hidden under darkness,
Shall make his Iron lukewarm in the bloody Rain.

ANNOT.

This signifieth, that when the Moon shall be totally Eclipsed in the night, and that all the next day her Brother the Sun shall be seen of a ferrugineous, (that is an Iron like colour) then shall a great one that was hidden arise, and do great feats of Arms with the death of many men.

LXXXV.

French.

Par la responce de Dame Roy troublé,
Ambassadeurs mespriseront leur vie,
Le grand ses Freres contrefera doublé,
Par deux mourront, hain, ire, & envie.

English.

A King shall be troubled by the answer of a Lady,
Embassadors shall despise their lives,
The great one being double in mind shall counterfeit his Brothers,
They shall die by two, anger, hatred, and envy.

[50]

ANNOT.

There is nothing difficult here, but the last Verse, which yet will be plain enough, if you make these three words anger, hatred, and envy not co-herent with the foremost, but subsisting by themselves; as if one should say, there shall be anger, hatred, and envy.

LXXXVI.

French.

La grande Roine quand se verra vaincue,
Fera exces de Masculin courage,
Sur le Cheval, Fleuve passera nue,
Suite par Fer, a Foy fera outrage.

English.

When the great Queen shall see her self vanquished,
She shall do a deed of a Masculine courage,
Upon a Horse, she shall pass over the River naked,
Followed by Iron, she shall do wrong to her Faith.

ANNOT.

It is some great Queen, who seeing her self vanquished, shall swim naked on Horseback over a River, being followed by those that would have either killed or taken her, and after that shall forfeit her faith, but whether it be to her Husband, Friends, or Relations, is not expressed.

LXXXVII.

French.

Ennosigee feu du Centre de Terre
Fera trembler autour de Cité Neuve,
Deux grands Rochers long temps feront la guerre,
Puis Arethuse rougira nouveau fleuve.

English.

Ennosigee, fire of the Center of the Earth,
Shall make quake about the New City,
Two great Rocks shall a great while War one against the other,
After that, Arethusa shall colour red a new River.

ANNOT.

Ennosigee is a Greek word εννοσίγαιος, in Latin Terræ quassator, from ἔνίω moveo, and γαῖα Terra, and is an Epithete of Neptune. The meaning then of this Stanza is, that the Sea shall make the Earth quake, and fire come out of the Earth about Naples, which in Greek is called Neapolis, that is, a New City.

[51]

Arethusa is a Fountain in Sicily, which a little way from its Spring, groweth into a River. The rest is left to the interpretation of the Reader.

LXXXVIII.

French.

Le Divin mal surprendra un grand Prince,
Un peu devant aura femme espousée,
Son appuy & credit a un coup viendra mince,
Conseil mourra pour la teste rasée.

English.

The Divine sickness shall surprise a great Prince,
A little while after he hath married a woman,
His support and credit shall at once become slender,
Council shall die for the shaven head.

ANNOT.

By the Divine sickness, he meaneth the falling sickness, called by the Greeks Epilepsia, and by the Latines Morbus Sacer. By the shaven head, he meaneth some Ecclesiastical person of the Romish Religion; the construction of the whole is easie.

LXXXIX.

French.

Tous ceux d’Illerde seront dans la Moselle,
Mettant a mort tous ceux de Loire & Seine,
Le course Marin viendra pres d’Hautevelle,
Quand Espagnols ouvrira toute veine.

English.

All those of Illerde shall be in the Mosel,
Putting to death all those of Loire and Seine,
The Sea course shall come near Hautevelle,
When the Spaniard shall open all veins.

ANNOT.

By Illerde he meaneth the City of l’Isle in Flanders, the Mosel is a River that runneth through Lorrain, the Loire and Seine are two other Rivers of France, the first of which passeth at Orleans, and the second at Paris; the two last Verses are too hard for me to interpret.

[52]

XC.

French.

Bourdeaux, Poitiers, au son de la Campane,
A grande classe ira jusqu’a Langon,
Contre Gaulois sera leur Tramontane,
Quand Monstre hideux naistra pres de Orgon.

English.

Bourdeaux, Poitiers, at the sound of the Bell,
With a great Navy shall go as far as Langon,
Against the French shall their Tramontane be,
When an hideous Monster shall be born near Orgon.

ANNOT.

Tramontana, in Italian, is the North-wind. Orgon, is the name of a Town in Gascony, the rest of the construction is not difficult.

XCI.

French.

Les dieux feront aux humains apparence,
Ce quils seront auteurs de grand conflict,
Avant ciel veu serain, Espée & Lance,
Que vers main gauche sera plus grande affliction.

English.

The Gods shall make it appear to Man-kind,
That they are the Authors of a great War;
For the Heaven that was Serene, shall shew Sword and Lance,
Signifying, that on the left hand the affliction shall be greater.

ANNOT.

He foretelleth here some Prodigies that shall be in the Air, as Swords and Lances after fair weather, which shall be forerunners of great Wars, and chiefly in those Countries that shall be situated on the left hand of these Prodigies.

XCII.

French.

Soubs un la paix, par tout sera clemence,
Mais non long temps, pille & rebellion,
Par refus Ville, Terre & Mer entamée,
Morts & Captifs le liers d’un Million.
[53]

English.

Under one shall be peace, and every where clemency,
But not a long while, then shall be plundering and Rebellion,
By a denyal shall Town, Land and Sea be assaulted,
There shall be Dead and taken Prisoners the third part of a Million.

ANNOT.

The words and sense are plain.

XCIII.

French.

Terre Italique des Mons tremblera,
Lion & Coq non trop confederez,
en lieu & peur l’un l’autre saidera,
Seul Catulon & Celtes moderez.

English.

The Italian Land of the Mountains shall tremble,
The Lion and the Cock shall not agree very well together,
Shall for fear help one another,
The only Catulon and Celtes shall be moderate.

ANNOT.

By the Lion he understandeth the English, because of their Arms, and by the Cock the French, called in Latin Gallus, which signifieth a Cock; Catulon is the Spaniards, as if he should say Castilian; the Celtes are the Dutch of the Low-Countries.

XCIV.

French.

Au Port Selyn le Tyrant mis a Mort,
La liberté non pourtant recouvrée,
Le nouveau Mars par vindict & remort,
Dame par force de frayeur honorée.

English.

In the Port Selyn the Tyrant shall be put to death
And yet the liberty shall not be recovered,
The new Mars by vengeance and remorse,
Lady by excess of fear honoured.

[54]

ANNOT.

By the Port Selyn, is meant Constantinople, because of several Emperours of the Turks that have been of that name, therefore the intention of this Prophecy, is, that one of the Turkish Emperours shall be put to death at Constantinople, which for all that, shall not recover her liberty. The new Mars, be like he is so called, that shall put him to death by vengeance without remorse. The Lady by excess of fear honoured, may be applied to the present great Sultaness, Mother to this present Emperour of the Turks, who hath hitherto made her self very considerable by a great party, which she hath raised against her Son, to prevent him from putting his Brothers to death, as is usually practised in that Court.

XCV.

French.

Devant Moustier trouvé enfant besson,
D’Heroik sang de Moine & vetustique,
Son bruit per Secte, Langue, & puissance Son,
Qu’on dira fort eslevé le Vopisque.

English.

Before the Minster shall one twin be found,
From Heroik blood, of a Monk and Ancient,
His fame by Sect, Tongue, and Power shall be sounded,
So that they shall say the Vopisk is much raised.

ANNOT.

The meaning of the whole is, that a Twin shall be found before a Church, begot by a Monk, of Illustrious and Ancient Family, and shall become very famous, So that they shall say the Vopisk is much raised. Vopiscus in Latin, is, that one of the Twins, which cometh to perfect Birth.

XCVI.

French.

Celuy qu’aura la charge de destruire,
Temples & Sectes changez par fantaisie,
Plus aux Rochers, qu’aux vivans viendra nuire,
Par langue ornée d’oreille rassasie.

English.

He that shall have charge to destroy,
Churches and Sects, changed by fancy;
Shall do more harm to the Rocks, than to the living,
By a smooth tongue filling up the Ears.

[55]

ANNOT.

As the words of this Stanza are plain, so is the sense most obscure, and so to be left to the Readers private Judgement.

XCVII.

French.

Ce que fer, flamme, na sceu parachever,
La douce langue au conseil viendra faire,
Par respos, songe le Roy fera resuer,
Plus l’Ennemy en feu sang militaire.

English.

What neither Iron nor Fire could compass,
Shall be done by a smooth tongue in the Councel,
In sleep a dream shall make the King to think,
The more the Enemy in fire and Military blood.

ANNOT.

The sense of this is plain, though the words be somthing untowardly expressed.

XCVIII.

French.

Le Chef qu’aura conduit peuple infiny,
Loin de son Ciel: de mœurs & langue estrange,
Cinq mille en Crete & Thessalie finy,
Le Chef fuiant sauvé en la Marine Grange.

English.

The Captain that shall lead an infinite deal of people
Far from their Countrey, to one of strange manners and Language,
Five thousand in Candia and Thessalia finished,
The Head running away, shall be safe in a Barn by the Sea.

ANNOT.

It is some great Commander that shall lead a multitude of people into a strange Countrey, far from their own; suppose Candia and Thessalia, where the said Commander shall be compelled to run away, and to save himself in a Barn by the Sea side.

XCIX.

French.

Le grand Monarque qui fera compagnie,
Avec deux Rois unis par amitié,
O quel souspir fera la grand mesgnie,
Enfans, Narbonne alentour, quel pitié!
[56]

English.

The great Monarch shall keep company,
With two Kings united in friendship;
O what fights shall be made by their followers!
Children, O what pity shall be about Narbon.

ANNOT.

This Stanza requireth no interpretation more, than what every one will be pleased to give himself.

C.

French.

Long temps au Ciel sera veu gris Oiseau,
Aupres de Dole & de Tuscane Terre,
Tenant au Bec un verdoiant rameau,
Mourra tost Grand, & finira la Guerre.

English.

A great while shall be seen in the Air a gray Bird,
Near Dola and the Tuscan Land,
Holding in his Bill a green bough;
Then shall a great one die, and the War have and end.

ANNOT.

Dola is a Town in Burgundy. The Tuscan Land, is that which belongeth to the Duke of Florence.


[57]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY II.

I.

French.

Vers Aquitaine par insults Britanniques,
De par eux mesmes grandes incursions,
Pluyes, Gelees, feront terroirs iniques,
Port Selyn fortes fera invasions.

English.

Towards Gascony by English assaults,
By the same shall be made great incursions,
Rains, Frosts, shall marre the ground.
Port Selyn shall make strong Invasions.

ANNOT.

Three Prophecies are contained in this Stanza, the first that the English shall make an incursion in Gascony; the second, that there shall be a great dearth by Rains and Frosts; the third, that the Turks shall make great Incursion.

[58]

II.

French.

La teste glue sera la teste blanche,
Autant de mal que France a fait leur bien,
Mort a l’Anthene, grand pendu fus la branche,
Quand prins des siens, le Roy dira combien.

English.

The Glue-head shall do the white head
As much harm, as France hath done it good,
Dead at the Sails yard, a great one hang’d on a Tree,
When a King taken by his own, shall say, how much?

ANNOT.

I did never find that word of Glue-head before in any Author, and I believe if Cotgrave were alive again, it would puzzle him to give the interpretation thereof.

The third and fourth signifie, that one shall be hanged on the Sails-yard, and another on a Tree, when a King shall be taken by his own Men, and shall say how much? that is, how much money shall I give you to set me free.

III.

French.

Par la chaleur Solaire sur la Mer,
De Negrepont, les Poissons demy cuits,
Les Habitans les viendront entamer,
Quand Rhode & Genes leur faudra le Biscuit.

English.

By the heat of the Sun upon the Sea
Of Negrepont, the Fishes shall be half broiled,
The Inhabitants shall come to cut them up,
When Rhodes and Genoa shall want Biscake.

ANNOT.

Negrepont is an Island of the Archipelago near Morea, anciently called Eubœa. Rhodes is another Island, and, Genoa a City in Italy, by the Seaside. The rest is plain.

IV.

French.

Depuis Monac jusqu’aupres de Sicile,
Toute la plage demoura desolée,
Il ny aura Fauxbourgs, Cité, ne Ville,
Que par Barbares pillée soit & volée.
[59]

English.

From Monaco as far as Sicily,
All the Sea coast shall be left desolate,
There shall not be Suburbs, Cities, nor Towns,
Which shall not be pillaged and plundred by Barbarians.

ANNOT.

Monaco is a Town seated by the Sea-side in Italy, between Provence and Genoa. This Prophecy hath been once already fulfilled, when the famous Pyrate Barbarossa, being sent by the grand Seignor, to help the French King against the Emperour Charles the V. in his return home, plundered all that Coast, and carried away an innumerable multitude of people into slavery.

V.

French.

Quand dans Poisson, Fer & Lettre enfermée,
Hors sortira qui puis fera la Guerre,
Aura par Mer sa classe bien ramée;
Aparoissant pres de Latine Terre.

English.

When in a Fish, Iron and a Letter shall be shut up,
He shall go out that afterwards shall make War,
He shall have his Fleet by Sea well provided,
Appearing by the Roman Land.

ANNOT.

The words and the sense are plain.

VI.

French.

Aupres des Portes & dedans deux Citez,
Seront deux Fleaux & onc n’aperceu un tel,
Faim, dedans Peste, de Fer hors gens boutez,
Crier secours au grand Dieu immortel.

English.

Near the Gates and within two Cities
Shall be two Scourges, I never saw the like,
Famine, within Plague, people thrust out by the Sword,
Shall cry for help to the great God immortal.

[60]

ANNOT.

This needeth no Interpretation.

VII.

French.

Entre plusieurs aux Isles deportez,
L’un estre nay a deux dens en la gorge,
Mourront de Faim, les Arbres esbroutez,
Pour eux neuf Roy, nouvel Edict leur forge.

English.

Among many that shall be transported into the Islands,
One shall be born with two Teeth in his mouth,
They shall die of hunger, the Trees shall be eaten,
They shall have a new King, who shall make new Laws for them.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no explication.

VIII.

French.

Temples Sacrez, prime facon Romaine,
Rejetteront les goffes Fondemens,
Prenant leurs Loix premieres & humaines,
Chassants non tout, de Saints le cultement.

English.

Churches Consecrated, and the ancient Roman way,
Shall reject the tottering Foundations,
Sticking to their first humane Laws,
Expelling, but not altogether the worshipping of Saints.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy, is concerning the beginning of the Reformed Religion, when the Roman Church rejected it, yet nevertheless, for shame they left off many of their fopperies, for ever since they never appeared so great Worshippers of Saints as before.

[61]

IX.

French.

Neuf ans le Regne le maigre en paix tiendra,
Puis il cherra en soif si sanguinaire,
Pour luy grand peuple sans Foy & Loy mourra,
Tué par un beaucoup plus debonaire.

English.

Nine years shall the lean one keep the Kingdom in Peace,
Then he will fall into such a bloody thirst,
That a great people shall die without Faith or Law,
He shall be killed by one milder than himself.

ANNOT.

It is a lean man that shall keep in Peace the Kingdom, for the space of nine years, and then shall become cruel; so that he shall put to death many people without Law, or regard of his promise.

X.

French.

Avant long temps le tout sera rangé,
Nous esperons un siecle bien senestre,
L’Estat des masques & des seuls bien changé,
Peu trouveront qui a son rang vueille estre.

English.

Before it be long, all shall be set in order,
We look for a sinister Age,
The state of the Visards and of the alone shall be changed,
They shall find few that will keep their ranks.

ANNOT.

All the difficulty of this consisteth in what he meaneth by the Visard and alone, for my part, I believe he aimeth at the Popish Clergy and Monks; the first by reason of their Hypocrisy, the other by reason of their solitariness. The rest is plain.

XI.

French.

Le prochain, fils de l’Aisnier parviendra,
Tant eslevé jusqu’au au Regne des fors,
Son aspre gloire un chascun la craindra,
Mais les enfans du Regne jettez hors.
[62]

English.

The eldest Son of l’Aisnier shall prosper,
Being raised to the degree of the great ones,
Every one shall fear his high glory,
But his children shall be cast out.

ANNOT.

This is an Horoscope, for the Interpretation of which we are beholding to, Mr. Mannessier of Amiens, who saith that the Father of the Lords l’Aisniers writ to Nostradamus his friend, to know his childrens fortune, who sent him those four Verses for an answer, by which it is evident that the eldest should be an eminent Man, as it fell out, being one of the chiefest men in the Province of Anjou, and one of the chiefest instruments to make Peace between Louis the XIII. and his Mother Mary of Medicis, after the Battle of Pont de Cé.

The fourth Verse saith, that some of his other Children should be expelled the Kingdom, as it happened by reason of a false report raised against one of them, which compelled him to retire into Portugal till the truth was known, as it was afterwards to his great repute and honour.

XII.

French.

Yeux clos ouverts d’antique fantaisie,
L’habit des seuls sera mis a neant,
Le grand Monarque chastiera leur frenesie,
Ravir des Temples le Thresor par devant.

English.

Eyes shut, shall be open by an antick fancy,
The cloths of the alone shall be brought to nothing.
The great Monarck shall punish their frenzy,
For having ravished the Treasure of the Temple before.

ANNOT.

I can fasten this upon no body, but upon some Monks, which are called here The alone, because of their solitary life, who shall be punished by a King, for having robbed the Church.

XIII.

French.

Le corps sans ame plus n’estre en sacrifice,
Jour de la mort mis en Nativité.
L’Esprit Divin sera l’ame fœlice,
Voiant le Verbe en son Eternité.
[63]

English.

The body without the soul shall be no more admitted in Sacrifice,
The day of the death shall be put for the Birth-day,
The Divine Spirit shall make the Soul happy,
By seeing the Word in its Eternity.

ANNOT.

The first Verse seemed to Prophecy the Reformation of Religion, and the change of opinion concerning the Lords Supper, which should be no more a Sacrifice (as the Roman Church calleth the Mass) of a body without a soul, but only a commemoration of the Lords death, as the second Verse confirmeth, saying, The day of the death shall be put for the Birth-day, seeing, that by the commemoration of that death, we are renewed into a newness of life, and as it were born again. The last two Verse are easie.

XIV.

French.

A Tours, Gien, Gergeau, seront yeux penetrans,
Descouvriront le long de la grande Sereine,
Elle & sa Suite au Port seront entrans,
Combat poussez Puissance Souveraine.

English.

At Tours, Gien, Gergeau, shall be piercing eyes,
Who shall discover along the great Syren,
She and her Attendans shall enter into the Port,
By a fight shall be thrust out the Soveraign Power.

ANNOT.

Tours, Gien, and Gergeau are Cities upon the River of Loire, which is called here the great Syren, because of the length of its course, the meaning then is, that those Cities shall be watchful, and stand upon their guard, and shall fight against a King, which if it hath already come to pass in the Civil Wars, or shall happen hereafter, I cannot affirm.

XV.

French.

Un peu devant Monarque trucidé,
Castor, Pollux, en nef astre crinite,
L’Airain public, par Terre & Mer vuidé,
Pisa, Ast, Ferrare, Turin Terre interdite.
[64]

English.

A little before a Monarch be killed
Castor, and Pollux shall appear, and a Comet in the Ship;
The publick brass, by Land and Sea shall be emptyed,
Pisa, Ast, Ferrare, Turin, Countreys forbidden.

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that a little before a Monarck be killed, Castor and Pollux two Meteores so called, as also a Comet in that constellation of the Heavens, called the ship of Argos, and the Publick Brass, that is, the Canons by Land and Sea shall be emptied, and these Towns of Italy, viz. Pisa, Ast, Ferrare, Turin, shall be excommunicated by the Pope.

XVI.

French.

Naples, Palerme, Sicile, Syracuse,
Nouveaux Tyrants, fulgures, feu Cœlestes,
Force de Londres, Gand, Bruxelles, & Suse,
Grand Hecatombe, Triomphe, faire Festes.

English.

Naples, Palermo, Sicily, Syracusa,
New Tyrants, Lightnings, Celestial fires,
Army from London, Ghent, Bruxelles, and Suse,
A great Hecatomb, Triumphs, and Feasts.

ANNOT.

There is nothing difficult but the word Hecatomb, which is a Greek word, signifying a Sacrifice of an hundred Oxen.

XVII.

French.

Le Camp du Temple de la Vierge Vestale,
Non esloigné d’Ethene & Monts Pyrenées,
Le grand conduit est chassé dans la Male,
North gettez Fleuves, & Vignes mastinées.

English.

The Camp of the Temple of the Vestal Virgin,
Not far from Ethene and the Pyrenean Mountains,
The great Conduit is driven in the Clock-bag,
Rivers overflown in the North, and the Vines spoiled.

[65]

ANNOT.

There is so many faults in the impression of this, and so hard to be rectified, that I had rather leave it to the liberty of the judicious Reader, then make my self ridiculous in not giving him satisfaction.

XVIII.

French.

Nouvelle Pluie, subite, impetueuse,
Empeschera subit deux excercites,
Pierre, Ciel, Feux, faire la Mer pierreuse,
La mort de sept, Terre & Marin subites.

English.

A new Rain, sudden, impetuous,
Shall suddenly hinder two Armies,
Stone, Heaven, Fire, shall make the Sea stony,
The death of seven shall be sudden upon Land and Sea.

ANNOT.

The first two Verses signifie, that a sudden and impetuous Rain shall hinder two Armies from fighting.

The two last Verses foretell several Prodigies, the which happening, seven persons shall suddenly die upon the Sea and Land.

XIX.

French.

Nouveaux venus, lieu basty sans defence,
Occuper place pour lors inhabitable,
Prez, Maisons, Champs, Villes prendre a plaisance,
Faim, Peste, Guerre, arpent long labourable.

English.

New comers shall build a place without fence,
And shall occupy a place that was not then habitable,
They shall at their pleasure take Fields, Houses and Towns.
There shall be Famine, Plague, War, and a long arable field.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no Interpretation.

[66]

XX.

French.

Freres & Sœurs en divers lieux captifs,
Se trouveront passer pres du Monarque,
Les contempler ses deux yeux ententifs,
Des plaisant vont, Menton, Front, Nez les marques.

English.

Brothers and Sisters shall be made slaves in divers places,
And shall pass before the Monarck,
Who shall look upon them with attentive eyes,
They shall go in heaviness, witness their Chin, Forehead and Nose.

ANNOT.

This is obvious to the meanest capacity.

XXI.

French.

L’Ambassadeur envoié par Biremes,
A my chemin incogneus repoulsez,
De Sel renfort viendront quatre triremes,
Cordes & Chaines en Negrepont troussez.

English.

The Embassadour that was sent in Biremes,
In the midleway shall be repulsed by unknown Men,
From the Salt to his succours shall come four triremes,
Ropes and Chains shall be carried to Negrepont.

ANNOT.

Bireme is a Galley that hath two ranges of Oares, Trireme is one that hath three ranges. The meaning then of this is, that an Embassadour shall be sent in a Galley with two ranges of Oares, and that he shall be met in his way by unknown men, that is, Pyrates; there shall come to his succours from the Salt, that is, from the French four Triremes, that is four Galleys, every one having three ranges of Oares, but they shall all be carried to Negrepont, an Island belonging to the Turk.

XXII.

French.

Le Camp Ascop d’Europe partira,
Sadioignant proche de l’Isle submergée,
D’Arton classe Phalange partira,
Nombril du Monde plus grand voix subrogée.
[67]

English.

The Camp Ascop shall go from Europe,
And shall come near the drowned Island;
From Arton shall go an Army by Sea and Land,
By the Navel of the World a greater vice shall be substituted.

ANNOT.

The Author hath darkned this Stanza with so many barbarous words, as Camp Ascop, drowned Island, D’Arton, Navel of the World, that it is very like either he did not understand himself, or would not be understood by others.

XXIII.

French.

Palaces Oiseaux, par Oiseau dechassé,
Bien tost apres le Prince parvenu,
Combien qu’hors Fleuve ennemy repoulsé,
Dehors saisy, trait d’Oiseau soustenu.

English.

Palais Birds, driven away by a Bird,
Soon after that, the Prince is come to his own,
Although the enemy be driven beyond the River,
He shall be seased upon without, by the trick of the Bird.

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that many Courtiers (called here Palace Birds) shall be justled out of favour by another principal Bird, that is a great Courtier, as soon as the Prince shall come to his own.

The two last Verses seem to foretell that the said principal Courtier shall seize upon the Prince, notwithstanding that some succour shall come to his help, which shall be beaten back beyond the River.

XXIV.

French.

Bestes farouches de faim Fleuves traner,
Plus part du Champ encontre Ister sera,
En Cage de Fer le grand fera traisner.
Quand rien enfant de Germain n’observera.
[68]

English.

Wild Beasts for hunger shall swim over Rivers,
Most part of the field shall be near Ister,
Into an Iron Cage he shall cause the great one to be drawn,
When the Child of German shall observe nothing.

ANNOT.

Ister is a River, German is a proper name of some considerable person, whose Son shall not observe or take notice when that eminent person mentioned here, shall be drawn into an Iron Cage.

XXV.

French.

La Garde estrange trahira Forteresse,
Espoir & umbre de plus haut mariage,
Garde deceüe Fort prins dedans la presse,
Loire, Saone, Rhosne, Gar, a Mort outrage.

English.

The Garrison of strangers shall betray the Fort,
Under the hope and shadow of a higher Match,
The Garrison shall be deceived, and the Fort taken in the crowd,
Loire, Saone, Rhosne, Gar, shall do harm to Death.

ANNOT.

There is no difficulty but in the last Verse, where you must observe that Loire, Saone, Rhosne, and Gardon, which for the Verses sake is contracted into Gar; are Rivers of France, which are threatned here of overflowing, and causing the death of many people.

XXVI.

French.

Pour la faveur que la Cité fera,
Au grand qui tost perdra Camp de Bataille,
Le sang d’ans Pau le Thesin versera,
De sang feux, mors, noyez de coup de taille.

English.

Because of the favour the City shall shew,
To the great one, who soon after shall loose the Battle,
The Thesin shall pour blood into the Pau,
Of blood, fire, dead, drowned, by Edgeling.

[69]

ANNOT.

This is plain, if you observe that the Thesin is a River of Italy, and the Pau another, into the which the Thesin runneth.

XXVII.

French.

Le Divin Verbe sera du ciel frappé,
Qui ne pourra proceder plus avant,
Du resserrant le secret estoupé,
Quon marchera par dessus & devant.

English.

The Divine Word shall be struck by Heaven,
So that he shall proceed no further,
The secret of the close Keeper, shall be so closed up,
That people shall tread upon, and before it.

ANNOT.

By the Divine Word, you must not understand the second person of the Trinity, or else all this Stanza would be absurd; but you must understand a Divine or Theologian, called in Greek θεόλογος, which signifieth a Divine Word. The meaning therefore of it, is, that a Theologian shall be struck by Heaven; that is, shall die, so that he shall proceed no further in his work, which I suppose by the two last Verses, was the Philosophers stone; for in the two last Verses he saith, that the secret of the close Keeper, that is, of him that wrought secretly, shall (by his death) be so closed up, that people shall tread on, and before it.

XXVIII.

French.

Le penultiesme de Surnom de Prophete,
Prendra Diane pour son jour & repos,
Loing vaguera par Frenetique teste,
Et delivrant un grand peuple d’Impos.

English.

The last, but one of the Sirname of the Prophet,
Shall take Diana for his day and his rest,
He shall wander far by reason of his Frenetick head,
Delivering a great people from impositions.

ANNOT.

This is concerning a false Prophet, which is called here the last but one of that Surname, who shall make Diana (that is Monday which is dedicated to Diana) his Sunday or Sabbath day, and so wandring to and fro in a Frenetick manner, shall perswade many people to pay no Taxes.

[70]

XXIX.

French.

L’Oriental sortira de son Siege,
Passer les Monts Apennins, voir la Gaule,
Transpassera le Ciel, les Eaux & Neige,
Et un chacun frappera de sa Gaule.

English.

The Oriental shall come out of his Seat,
Shall pass over the Apennine Mountains, and see France,
Shall go over the Air, the Waters and Snow,
And shall strike every one with his Rod.

ANNOT.

It is an Eastern Prince, who leaving his Countrey, shall come over the Apennine Mountains, which divide Italy, and come as far as France, destroying all before him.

XXX.

French.

Un qui les Dieux d’Annibal infernaux,
Fera renaistre, effrayeur des Humains,
Onc plus d’horreur ne plus dire journaux,
Qu’avint viendra par Babel aux Romains.

English.

One that shall cause the infernal Gods of Hannibal
To live again, the terror of Mankind,
There was never more horror, not to say ill dayes,
Did happen, or shall, to the Romans by Babel.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy was concerning Charles V. Emperour, who sacked Rome, took the Pope Prisoner, and filled it with more horror and slaughter than Hannibal did, though a Heathen.

XXXI.

French.

En Campanie le Cassilin fera tant,
Quon ne verra que d’Aux les Champs couvers,
Devant apres la pluye de long temps,
Hormis les arbres rien lon verra de verts.
[71]

English.

In Campania the Cassilin shall so behave himself,
That nothing shall be seen but Fields covered with Garlick,
Before, and after it, shall not Rain for a good while,
Except the Trees, no Green shall be seen.

ANNOT.

This hath a dependance upon the foregoing Stanza; for Campania is the Province wherein Rome is seated, and Cassilin, called Campania di Roma, is the same as Castillan, because Charles V. was not only Emperour, but also King of Spain, the chief Province of which is Castilia: therefore the Author describeth here the misery and devastation of Campania di Roma by the Castilian, who left nothing in the ground, but Garlick, which is their most delicate food, and nothing Green but the Trees.

XXXII.

French.

Lait Sang, Grenovilles, escouldre en Dalmatie,
Conflit donné, peste pres de Balene,
Cry sera grand par toute Esclavonie,
Lors naistra Monstre pres & dedans Ravenne.

English.

Milk, Blood, Frogs shall reign in Dalmatia,
A Battle fought, the Plague near Balene,
A great cry shall be through all Sclavonia,
Then shall be born a Monster, near and within Ravenna.

ANNOT.

Dalmatia and Sclavonia, are Countreys joyning to the Adriatick Sea, belonging to the Venetians. Ravenna is a City in Italy, the rest needeth no interpretation.

XXXIII.

French.

Dans le torrent qui descend de Verone,
Par lors qu’au Pau guidera son entrée,
Un grand Naufrage, & non moins en Garonne,
Quand ceux de Genes Marcheront leur contrée.
[72]

English.

In the torrent which cometh down from Verona,
About the place where it falleth into the Pau,
A great Shipwrack, and no less in Garonna,
When those of Genoa shall go into their Countrey.

ANNOT.

Verona is a City in Italy, belonging to the Venetians, through the middle of which runneth a River called Adde, which falleth into the River Pau, about which place there shall be a great Shipwrak; as also another in the River of Garonna, which passeth at Bordeaux, the time that the Author marketh, is when those of Genoa shall go into their Countrey, that is to say, when some Ships of Genoa shall come to Bordeaux.

XXXIV.

French.

L’Ire insensée du Combat furieux,
Fera a Table par Freres le Fer luire,
Les departir, blessé, curieux,
Le fier duel viendra en France nuire.

English.

The mad anger of the furious fight,
Shall cause by Brothers the Iron to glister at the Table,
To part them one wounded, curious,
The fierce Duel shall do harm after in France.

ANNOT.

It is the short History of two Brothers, who fought at the Table, whereby one that was curious to part them was wounded, they afterwards fought a Duel, in whose imitation many since have been fought, to the great harm of the French Gentry.

XXXV.

French.

Dans deux Logis de nuit le feu prendra,
Plusieurs dedans estoufez & rostis,
Pres de deux Fleuves pour seur il adviendra,
Sol, l’Arc, & Caper, tous seront amortis.
[73]

English.

The fire shall take by night in two Houses,
Many shall be stifled and burnt in it;
Near two Rivers it shall for certain happen,
Sun, Arc, Caper, they shall all be mortified.

ANNOT.

By Sun, Arc, Caper, he meaneth the Sun being in the Signs of Sagitarius and Capricornus.

This Prophecy was fulfilled about 90. years ago in the City of Lion, seated upon two Rivers, viz. the Rhosne and the Saone, for about that time several Merchants coming to the Fair, some went to lodge at the Silver Head, in the street de la Grenete, where being in an upper room, as they were talking of their businesses, and passing the time merrily, the fire took in the Kitchen where was abundance of Oil, which did burn so suddenly and so violently, that the lower part of the House was presently consumed. Those Merchants that were in the upper room towards the street, begun to look for their Clock-bags, that were lockt up in a Trunk; but while they were busie about opening the Trunk, the Stair-case fell, and the fire got into their Room, then begun they to cry for help through the Windows. They would willingly have thrown themselves down the Windows, but they were barred with Iron, so that they could not save themselves, the House being a fire on all sides; Moreover, the neighbours taking more care of their own Houses, then of those Strangers, did run every one to his own concerns, so that they all miserably perished. Parradin in his 3. Book of the History of Lyon, Chap. 22.

XXXVI.

French.

Du grand Prophete les Lettres seront prinses,
Entre les Mains du Tyran deviendront,
Frauder son Roy seront ses entreprinses,
Mais ses rapines bien tost le troubleront.

English.

The Letters of the great Prophet shall be intercepted,
They shall fall into the hands of the Tyrant,
His undertakings shall be to deceive his King,
But his extortions shall trouble him soon.

ANNOT.

It is some eminent Churchman, whose Letters shall be intercepted, by which he intended to betray his King, therefore his actions shall be called in question, and being found guilty of extortion, he shall suffer for it.

[74]

XXXVII.

French.

De ce grand nombre que l’on envoiera,
Pour secourir dans le fort assiegez,
Peste & Famine tous les devorera,
Horsmis septante qui seront profligez.

English.

Of that great number which shall be sent,
To succour the besieged in the Fort,
Plague and Famine shall devour them all,
Except seventy that shall be beaten.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no explication.

XXXVIII.

French.

Des Condamnez sera fait un grand nombre,
Quand les Monarques seront conciliez,
Mais l’un deux viendra si mal encombre,
Que guere ensemble ne seront raliez.

English.

There shall be a great number of condemned men,
When the Monarchs shall be reconciled,
But one of them shall come to such misfortune,
That their reconciliation shall not last long.

ANNOT.

The words and sense of this are easie to be understood.

XXXIX.

French.

Un an devant le conflict Italique,
Germains, Gaulois, Espagnols pour le Fort,
Cherra l’Escole maison de republique,
Ou horsmis peu, seront suffoquez morts.
[75]

English.

One year before the Italian fight,
Germans, French, Spaniards for the Fort,
The School-house of the Common-wealth shall fall,
Where, except few, they shall be suffocated, and dead.

ANNOT.

It seemeth there should be a Battle between the Italians, Germans, French, Spaniards for a Fort, which I suspect to have been that of Serizoles, wherein all those Nations were engaged, and that one year before that Battle, the publick house of a Common-wealth should fall, and kill abundance of people; But of this I could find nothing in History.

XL.

French.

Un peu apres non point long intervalle,
Par Mer & Terre sera fait grand tumulte,
Beaucoup plus grande sera pugne Navalle,
Feu, Animaux, qui plus feront d’Insulte.

English.

A little while after, without any great distance of time,
By Sea and Land shall a great tumult be made,
The Sea fight shall be much greater,
Fire and Beasts which shall make greater insult.

ANNOT.

This hath a Relation to a foregoing Stanza, and likewise is not hard to be understood.

XLI.

French.

La grand Estoile par sept jours bruslera,
Nuce fera deux Soleils apparoir,
Le gros mastin toute nuit hurlera,
Quand grand Pontife changera de terroir.

English.

The great Star shall burn for the space of seven days,
A Cloud shall make two Suns appear,
The big Mastif shall houl all night,
When the great Pope shall change his Countrey.

[76]

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that those three Prodigies, contained in the first three Verses, shall appear when a Pope changeth his Countrey.

XLII.

French.

A Coq, Chiens, & Chats de sang seront repeus,
Et de la playe du Tyran trouvé Mort,
Au lict d’un autre, Jambes & Bras rompus,
Qui n’avoit peu mourir de cruel Mort.

English.

A Cock, Dogs, and Cats shall be fed with Blood,
And with the wound of the Tyrant found dead,
In the bed of another, with Legs and Arms broken,
Who could not die before by a cruel Death.

ANNOT.

These words signifie, that a great man or Tyrant shall be found dead in another mans Bed, having his Legs and Arms broken, the body of which shall be devoured by these three kinds of Creatures, a Cock, a Dog, and a Cat. The last Verse signifieth that this Tyrant had escaped a cruel Death.

XLIII.

French.

Durant l’estoile cheuelue apparente,
Les trois grand Princes seront faits ennemis,
Frappez du Ciel, Paix, Terre tremulente,
Arne, Tibre, undans Serpent sur le bord mis.

English.

During the hairy apparent Star,
The three great Princes shall be made Enemies,
Struck from Heaven, Peace, quaking Earth,
Arne, Tyber, full of Surges, Serpent cast upon the Shore.

ANNOT.

In the year 1556. upon the first day of March appeared a blazing Star which lasted three Months, and in that year the three great Princes were made Enemies, viz. Paul IV. Pope, Henry II. King of France, and Philip II. King of Spain, about the breaking of the Truce by Henry II.

The Affairs not succeeding according to the Pope’s, and the King of France’s desire, they made Peace with the Spaniard the 14th of October 1557. and because it[77] was an effect of Gods Providence, which moved the Pope’s, and the Kings hearts; the Author saith, they were struck from Heaven.

After this Peace the Author mentions an Earth-quake, which is very likely considering the overflowing of the Tyber, which followed immediately.

The night after, that Peace was proclaimed at Rome, on a Tuesday the Tyber did so overflow his Banks, that the inundation was thought the greatest that ever was, yea greater than that which happened in the year 1530. under Clement VII.

There were ten or twelve Mills carried away, all the Vine-yards along the Tyber, from Pontemole to St. Peters Church, were buried under the Sands, that the water carried.

Abundance of Houses fell to the ground. In Rome many Gardens and houses of pleasure were destroyed, the loss of the Wines, Hay, Wood, and Corn could not be valued.

In Florence the River of Arno did more mischief than the Tyber at Rome, the History of the Genealogy of the house of Medicis, made by Peter de Boissat, mentioneth, that in some places of the City of Florence, the water overflowed to the heigth of eight Fathoms, and covered all the valley of Arne.

The damage was yet greater at Empoly, a Town in Tuscany, where, of three thousand people, there escaped but eighteen.

But to return to Tyber, its waters being retired into their Channel, left so much mud, where it had overflowed, that no body could walk upon it, and upon that mud near the Tyber, was a Serpent seen of a prodigious bigness, which was killed by the Countrey people.

This is the Authors meaning in the last Verse, Arne, Tyber, full of Surges, Serpent cast upon the Shore.

In the third Verse he saith, those three Princes were struck or moved from Heaven to make Peace, that is, from God; every one considering that this War was only for their mutual distruction.

The Vulgar impression putteth in the fourth Verse, Pau, Tyber, in stead of Arne, Tyber, which is a visible fault; for the History mentioneth only the inundation of those two Rivers in Italy, it may be that the likeness of those words, Pau and Arne, is the cause of the mistake; as also because the name of Pau, which is the biggest River in Italy, is more famous in History than that of Arne, which is the River that passeth through Florence.

XLIV.

French.

L’Aigles poussée entour de Pavillons,
Par autre oiseaux d’Entour sera chassé,
Quand bruit de Timbres, Tubes, & Sonaillons,
Rendront le sens de la Dame insensée.

English.

The Eagle flying among the Tents,
By other Birds shall be driven away,
When noise of Cymbals, Trumpets, and Bells,
Shall render the sense to the Lady that was without it.

[78]

ANNOT.

It is an Eagle driven from the Tents by other Birds, when a mad Lady shall recover her senses by the noise of Cymbals, Trumpets, and Bells.

XLV.

French.

Trop le Ciel pleure l’Androgyn procrée,
Pres de Ciel sang humain respandu,
Par mort trop tard grand peuple recrée,
Tard & tost vient le secours attendu.

English.

The Heaven bemoaneth too much the Androgyn born,
Near Heaven humane blood shall be spilt,
By death too late a great people shall be refreshed,
Late and soon cometh the succours expected.

ANNOT.

Androgyn, is one that is Male and Female, from the Greek word ἀνηρ, which signifieth a Male, and γυνή, which signifieth a Female; the meaning then of the first Verse is, that some great persons, suppose a King and Queen, which he calleth Heaven, by reason of their exaltation above the common sort of people, shall bemoan too long one of their Children, that was, or shall be born Male and Female.

The second Verse is easie to be understood, if you take Heaven in the same sense that we have said. The last two Verses are plain.

XLVI.

French.

Apres grand troche humain, plus grand sapreste,
Le grand Moteur les siecles renouvelle,
Pluye, Sang, Lait, Famine, Fer & Peste,
Au Ciel veu feu courant longue estincelle.

English.

After a great humane change, another greater is nigh at hand,
The great Motor reneweth the Ages,
Rain, Blood, Milk, Famine, Sword, Plague,
In the Heaven shall be seen a running fire with long sparks.

ANNOT.

Troche in Greek is a Pulley, the meaning therefore of the Author, that after a great mutation, God shall renew the Ages, and according to his promise shall create a new Heaven, and a new Earth.

[79]

By those prodigies related in the two last Verses, it seemeth the Author intendeth to speak of the last day, and of the fore-runners of it.

XLVII.

French.

L’Ennemy grand viel, deult, meurt de poison,
Les Souverains par infinis subjugues,
Pierres pleuvoir cache soubs la Toison,
Par mort Articles en vain sont alleguez.

English.

The great and old Enemy grieveth, dieth by Poison,
An infinite number of Soveraign’s conquered,
It shall rain stones, they shall hide under Rocks,
In vain shall death alledge Articles.

ANNOT.

This hath a relation to the foregoing Stanza, and is as it were the second part of it. For as the foremost speaketh of the last day, so doth this of Dooms-day.

First, he saith that the great and old Enemy grieveth and dieth by Poison, that’s the Devil who shall be cast into a Lake of Fire and Brimstone. The second Verse signifieth, that all the Kings of the Earth shall be subdued by him that is Lord of Lords and King of Kings. The third Verse expresseth, the anguish of the reprobate, when they shall cry to the Rocks, hide us, and to the Mountains, fall upon us. And the fourth Verse saith, that Death shall alledge in vain, the Articles she made with the Devil, and his Angels.

XLVIII.

French.

La grand Copie qui passera les Monts,
Saturne, Aries, tournant au Poisson Mars,
Venins cachez sous testes de Moutons,
Leur chef pendu a fil de Polemars.

English.

The great Army that shall pass over the Mountains,
Saturn, Aries, Mars, turning to the Fishes,
Poisons hidden in Sheeps heads,
Their Captain hang’d with a thred of Polemars.

ANNOT.

Paradin relateth in his History, that after the Duke of Alba had relieved Vulpian with Victuals, which was done from the 22. of July to the first of August, a Captain of the Emperors Army named la Trinité, went out of Valfrenieres the same first day of August, to plunder the Countrey of Piemont.

[80]

He had 400 Horses, and 500 Foot: The news being brought to the Marshal of Brissac, he sent out a great number of Horses, who did utterly destroy their Foot, so that but thirty escaped, to carry the news to Valfrenieres.

The Spanish Horse, seeing the French in such a fury, ran away, and got some to Ast, some to Alexandria.

After that, the Spaniards seeking to revenge themselves, took a Castle three miles from Cazal, called Frezene, or Fracinet du Pau, where they hanged up the Captain, put to the sword all the Italians, and sent all the French to the Galleys.

This proceeding being not according to the Laws of Arms, we may believe, that the victorious discovered a malitious craft of the vanquished, who had left some Sheeps-heads poisoned, to revenge themselves of the victorious, which obliged the Spaniards to serve so the Captain, the Italians and the French; and because the French were not so ill used, as the Italians, we may judge that the Italians were the chief contrivers of this business.

Therefore the Author foreseeing this, saith, that the great Army of the French, which shall go over the Mountains, shall come to this mischief, because of the poison that was hidden in the Sheeps heads.

The Vulgar impression erreth much in putting Salmons, for Muttons; for every body knoweth that the Salmons do not come into the Mountains of Montserrat, and that in the Month of August it is not a meat fit for Souldiers, therefore in stead of Salmons, we have put Muttons, or Sheep.

The Captain was hanged with a thread of Polemars, that is, with a Match, of which, I am perswaded, that one certain Polemars was the Inventor.

The Author saith in the second Verse, that the time when this accident happened, was, when Saturn was in Aries, the Vulgar impression putteth Are in stead of Aries, but that’s false, therefore set down Aries. Saturn was in that Sign in the year 1555. from the 20th of February, to the 14th of July, where from the 12th degree and four Minutes, he began to retrograde in the same Sign of Aries, till the 18th of November, so that Saturn was almost all that year in Aries.

He saith also that Mars was going back to Pisces; because in that same year, Mars that was gone out of the Sign of Pisces from the 19 of March 1554. was retrograding to come back again into it upon the 20th of January 1556.

Thus the Author meaneth, that this accident should happen in the year that Saturn should be in Aries, and Mars should be near the Sign of Pisces.

And to say truth, in the Month of August, Mars was in the Sign of Scorpio; upon the 23 of September, he entred into that of Sagitarius; the third of November, into that of Capricornus; the 12th of December into that of Aquarius; and the year following, viz. 1556. into that of Pisces; so that Mars was returning into Pisces, which is the end of its particular motion.

By this Astrological and Historical discourse we correct the Vulgar impression, which putteth turning from Pisces, Mars, in stead of which, we put, turning to Pisces, Mars, which we do by changing only from, into to, and sheweth us how careful we ought to be in the explication of these Stanza’s, when the time is prefixed to us by Astronomical calculations.

The Authors Phrase doth confirm us in this correction, when he useth this word turning, which signifieth the motion that tendeth towards its end, and not the motion that cometh from its end.

[81]

XLIX.

French.

Les conseillers du premier Monopole,
Les Conquerans seduits par la Melite,
Rhodes, Bisance pour leur exposant pole,
Terre faudra les pour-suivans de fuite.

English.

The advisers of the first Monopoly,
The Conquerors seduced by the Melite,
Rhodes, Bizance, for exposing their Pole,
The ground shall fail the followers of runaways.

ANNOT.

All the difficulty of this lieth in the signification of the word Pole, which in Greek signifieth a City. The word Monopoly is Vulgar, and signifieth when one or few would engross all the Trade of a Town. The rest is so obscure, that I had rather leave it to the liberty of the Reader, than break my Brains about it, considering chiefly that I am going to bed, the precedent Stanza having exhausted all my Spirits, and so farewell till to morrow.

L.

French.

Quand ceux d’Hainault, de Gand, & de Bruxelles,
Verront a Langres le Siege devant mis,
Derrier leur flancs seront guerres cruelles,
La playe antique sera pis qu’Ennemis.

English.

When these of Hainault, of Gand, and of Bruxelles,
Shall see the Siege laid before Langres,
Behind their sides shall be cruel Wars,
The old wound shall be worse then Enemies.

ANNOT.

Hainault is a Province of the Low-Countries, and Gand the chief Town in Flanders, and Bruxelles the chief Town of the Dukedome of Brabant.

Langres is a City in France, in the Province of Champagne, which is called the Maiden Town; because it was never besieged. The rest is easie.

LI.

French.

Le sang du juste a Londres fera faute,
Bruslez par feu de vingt & trois les Six,
La Dame antique cherra de place haute,
De mesme secte plusieurs seront occis.
[82]

English.

The blood of the just shall be wanting in London,
Burnt by fire of three and twenty, the Six,
The antient Dame shall fall from her high place,
Of the same Sect many shall be killed.

ANNOT.

Leaving unto the impartial Reader his liberty to judge of this Prophecy, we for our part understand by it the impious and execrable murder, committed upon the person of our last most gracious Sovereign King Charles I. of blessed memory, to whose expiation it seemeth our Author attributeth the conflagration of London. By that proportion of three and twenty, the Six, is to be understood the number of Houses and Buildings that were burnt, which is about the proportion of three in four, and cometh near to the computation, as also by that three twenties and Six, may be understood the year 66. By the antient Dame that shall fall from the high place, is understood the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, which in the time of Paganism was dedicated to Diana, meant here by the title of an antient Dame, the fall from her high place, hath relation both to the sumptuousness and height of her building, as also to her situation, which is in the most eminent place of the City.

By this Verse, Of the same Sect many shall be killed, is signified the great number of other Churches even the number of 87 (which he intimateth here by the name of the same Sect), that should be involved in the same woful conflagration.

LII.

French.

Dans plusieurs nuits la Terre tremblera,
Sur le printemps deux efforts feront suitte,
Corinthe, Ephese aux deux Mers nagera,
Guerre sesmeut par deux vaillants de Luitte.

English.

During many nights the Earth shall quake,
About the Spring two great Earth-quakes shall follow one another,
Corinth, Ephesus shall swim in the two Seas,
War shall be moved by two great Wrestlers.

ANNOT.

Corinth is a City of Grecia and Ephesus one of Asia; the rest is plain.

LIII.

French.

Le grande Peste de cité maritime,
Ne cessera que Mort ne soit vengée,
Du juste sang par prix damné sans crime,
De la grande Dame par feinte noutragée.
[83]

English.

The great Plague of the Maritime City,
Shall not cease till the death be revenged
Of the just blood by price condemned without crime,
Of the great Dame not fainedly abused.

ANNOT.

This is a confirmation of the LI. Stanza and foretelleth the great Plague we have had here in the year 1665. which he saith shall not cease till the death of the Just blood, meaning King Charles the I. be avenged who was as is here expressed, condemned without crime, and sold for a Price.

By the great Dame unfainedly abused, he meaneth the sumptuous Cathedral of St. Paul, which was polluted and made a Stable by those prophane wretches.

LIV.

French.

Par gent estrange & Nation lointaine,
Leur grand Cité, apres eau fort troublée,
Fille sans trop different de domaine,
Prins chef, serreure, navoir esté riblée.

English.

By a strange people and remote Nation,
The great City near the water shall be much troubled,
The Girl without great difference for a portion,
Shall take the Captain, the Lock having not been pickt.

ANNOT.

In the explication of this mystical Stanza, I believe every body may be as wise as I.

LV.

French.

Dans le conflit le grand qui peu valoit,
A son dernier fera cas merveilleux,
Pendant qu’Adrie verra ce qu’il failloit,
Dans le Banquet poignarde l’orgueilleux.

English.

In the fight the great one who was but little worth,
At his last endeavour shall do a wonderful thing.
While Adria shall see what was wanting,
In the Banquet he shall stabb the proud one.

[84]

ANNOT.

This is concerning some eminent person, who having shewed no great valour in a Battle, shall nevertheless in a Banquet be so bold as to stab a person of quality, that was proud.

This accident must happen somewhere about Venice, because he saith that Adria, which is taken for Venice shall look on.

LVI.

French.

Que Peste & Glaive n’a sceu definer,
Mort dans les pluies, sommet du Ciel frappé,
L’Abbé mourra quand verra ruiner,
Ceux du Naufrage, l’Escueil voulant graper.

English.

He whom neither Plague, nor Sword could destroy,
Shall die in the Rain being stricken with Thunder,
The Abbot shall die when he shall see ruined,
Those in the Shipwrack, striving to catch hold of the Rock.

ANNOT.

There is two accidents contained in this Stanza, the first is in the two first Verses, where he saith that some considerable person, who had escaped the Sword, and the Plague shall be strucken by the Thunder, and die in a great showr of Rain.

The second is, in the two last Verses, where he saith, an Abbot shall perish by Shipwrack, thinking to save himself by holding the Rock.

LVII.

French.

Avant conflit le grand tombera,
Le grand a mort trop subite & plainte,
Nay miparfait, la plus part nagera,
Aupres du Fleuve, de sang la Terre teinte.

English.

Before the Battle the great one shall fall,
The great one to death too sudden and bewailed;
One shall be born half perfect, the most part shall swim,
Near the River the Earth shall be dyed with blood.

ANNOT.

The words are plain enough, but of the sense every one may think what he pleaseth.

[85]

LVIII.

French.

Sans pied ne main, dent aigue, & forte.
Par Globe au fort de Port & laisne nay,
Pres du portail, desloial le transporte,
Seline luit, petit grand emmené.

English.

Without foot or hand, sharp and strong tooth,
By a Globe, in the middle of the Port, and the first born,
Near the Gate shall be transported by a Traitor,
Seline shineth, the little great one carried away.

ANNOT.

The sense of the whole is this, that an Infant begot by some person of quality shall be exposed in the night time, the Moon Shining, which he calleth Seline, from the Greek word σεληνη, which signifieth the Moon.

LIX.

French.

Classe Gauloise par appuy de grand Garde,
Du grand Neptune & ses tridens Soldats,
Ronger Provence pour soustenir grand bande,
Plus Mars, Narbon, par Javelots & Dards.

English.

The French Fleet by the help of the great Guard,
Of great Neptune and his Tridentary Soldiers
Shall gnaw Provence by keeping great company,
Besides, Mars shall plague Narbon by Javelins and Darts.

ANNOT.

Here be two things designed in this Stanza one is concerning Provence, which shall be eaten up by Soldiers, and the other concerning the City of Narbon, which shall be Besieged, or the Citizens fall out among themselves.

LX.

French.

La foy Punique en Orient rompue,
Grand Jud. & Rhosne, Loire & Tag changeront,
Quand du Mulet la faim sera repeue,
Classe espargie, Sang & Corps nageront.
[86]

English.

The punick faith broken in the East,
Great Jud. and Rhosne, Loire and Tag. shall be changed,
When the Mules hunger shall be satisfied,
The Fleet scattered, Blood and Bodies shall swim.

ANNOT.

The Punick Faith in Latine Punica fides, a false Faith, was so called from the Carthaginians, called in Latine Pæni, which was an unfaithful Nation.

I do not know what he meaneth by great Jud. as for Rhosne, Loire and Tag, they are three Rivers, the two first in France, the last is the River of Lisbone called in Latine Tagus. The rest is easie.

LXI.

French.

Agen, Tonneins, Gironde & la Rochelle,
O sang Troien mort au Port de la fleche,
Derrier le Fleuve au Fort mise leschelle,
Pointes, feu, grand meurtre sur la bresche.

English.

Agen, Tonneins, Gironde and Rochelle,
O Trojan blood death is at the harbour of the Arrow,
Beyond the River the Ladder shall be raised against the Fort,
Points, fire, great murder upon the breach.

ANNOT.

Agen and Tonneins are two Towns in Gascony, Gironde is a River that passeth in that Countrey, the sense therefore of the whole is, that there shall be great Wars, and fightings in those Towns, as also upon that River, which happened in the time of the civil Wars in France, as every body may read in the Annals, and also in the Commentaries of the Lord of Monluck.

LXII.

French.

Mabus puis tost alors mourra, viendra,
Des gens & bestes un horrible desfaite,
Puis tout a coup la vengeance on verra,
Sang, Main, Soif, Faim, quand courra la Comete.

English.

Mabus shall come, and soon after shall die,
Of people and beasts shall be an horrible destruction,
Then on a sudden the vengeance shall be seen,
Blood, Hand, Thirst, Famine, when the Comet shall run.

[87]

ANNOT.

Here is nothing hard but who should be this Mabus, at last I found by transposition of Letters that he meaneth Ambus, which was the name of the Heades man that beheaded the Duke of Montmorency at Thoulouse, how miraculous therefore appeareth our Author, who did not only foretell general things, but also particular accidents, even the names of the persons that were to be born a hundred years after.

LXIII.

French.

Gaulois, Ausone bien peu subiuguera,
Pau, Marne & Seine fera Perme l’Vrie,
Qui le grand Mur contre eux dressera,
Du moindre au Mur le grand perdra la vie.

English.

The French shall a little subdue Ausonne,
Pau, Marne, and Seine shall make Perme l’Urie,
Which shall raise a great Wall against them,
From the less to the Wall the great one shall loose his life.

ANNOT.

Ausonne is always taken by the Author for the City of Bordeaux, because Ausonius a famous Latine Poet was born there, the rest is so obscure, and the text so corrupted, that I had rather leave it to the liberty of the Reader, then to become ridiculous, by not acknowledging my ignorance.

LXIV.

French.

Seicher de faim, de soif, gent Genevoise,
Espoir prochain viendra au defaillir,
Sur point tremblant sera Loy Gebenoise,
Classe au grand Port ne se peut accueillir.

English.

Those of Geneva shall be dried up with hunger and thirst,
A near hope shall come when they shall be fainting,
The Gebenna Law shall be upon a quaking point,
The Navy shall not be capable to come into the Port.

ANNOT.

Here you must observe that Gebenna in Latine signifieth Geneva, and therefore this whole Stanza is concerning the City of Geneva.

[88]

LXV.

French.

Le park enclin grande calamité,
Par l’Hesperie & Insubre sera,
Le Feu en Nef, Peste, & Captivité,
Mercure en l’Ar, Saturn fenera.

English.

The Park enclineth to great calamity,
Which shall be through Hesperia and Insubria,
The Fire in the Ship, Plague, and Captivity,
Mercury in Aries, Saturn shall wither.

ANNOT.

Though the words be plain, nevertheless the sense is very obscure, and chiefly as I suppose by the faults of the impression, all what I can tell you here, is, that Hesperia in Latine, is Spain, and Insubria, is Savoy.

LXVI.

French.

Par grand dangers le Captif eschapé,
Peu de temps grand a fortune changée,
Dans le Palais le peuple est attrapé,
Par bonne augure la Cité assiegée.

English.

The Prisoner escaped through great danger,
A little while after shall become great, his fortune being changed,
In the Palace the people shall be caught,
And by a good Sign the City shall be besieged.

ANNOT.

All this is plain, both in the words and the Sense.

LXVII.

French.

Le blond au nez forche viendra commettre,
Par le Duel & chassera dehors,
Les exiles dedans fera remettre,
Aux lieux marins commettans les plus forts.
[89]

English.

The fair one shall fight with the forked Nose,
In Duel, and expel him out,
He shall re-establish the banished,
Putting the stronger of them in Maritine places.

ANNOT.

Both the Sense and the words are plain.

LXVIII.

French.

De l’Aquilon les efforts seront grands,
Sur l’Occean sera la Porte ouverte,
Le Regne en l’Isle sera re-integrand,
Tremblera Londres par voiles descouvertes.

English.

The endevours of the North shall be great,
Upon the Ocean the gate shall be open,
The Kingdom in the Island shall be re-established,
London shall quake, for fear of Sails discovered.

ANNOT.

This is a very remarkable one, which hath been fulfilled since the happy restauration of his sacred Majesty King Charles II. now Reigning: For the endevours of the North, (viz. the Dutch) have been very great. The ocean; like a gate, hath been open to all kind of Armies, to play their pranks upon. His Majesty, and Kingdom, have been happily restored.

LXIX.

French.

Le Roy Gaulois par la Celtique dextre,
Voiant discorde de la grand Monarchie,
Sur les trois parts fera fleurir son Sceptre,
Contre la Cappe de la grand Hierarchie.

English.

The French King, by the Low-Countreys right hand,
Seeing the discord of the great Monarchy,
Upon three parts of it, will make his Scepter to flourish,
Against the Cap of the great Hierarchy.

[90]

ANNOT.

This signifieth, that the French King, through the discord that is in the Spanish Monarchy, shall cause his Scepter to flourish upon three parts of the Netherlands; notwithstanding the assistance of the King of Spain, who is called here the Cap of the great Hierarchy; that is, the great defender of the Popedom and Popery.

LXX.

French.

Le Dard du Ciel fera son estendue,
Morts en parlant, grande execution,
La pierre en larbre la fiere gent rendue,
Brait Humain, Monstre purge expiation.

English.

The Dart of Heaven shall make his circuit,
Some die speaking, a great execution,
The stone in the tree, the fierce people humbled,
Humane noise, a Monster purged by expiation.

ANNOT.

All this Stanza signifieth nothing but a fearful Thunder and Lightning, called here, the Dart of Heaven, that shall do a great deal of mischief; for as he saith, some shall die speaking, there shall be a great execution, the Thunderbolt shall stick in the Tree, the people that was fierce, shall be humbled, and a Monster purged by expiation, that some notorious wicked person shall be consumed by that Cœlestial fire.

LXXI.

French.

Les exiles en Sicile viendront,
Pour delivrer de faim la gent estrange,
Au point du jour les Celtes luy faudront,
La vie demeure a raison Roy se range.

English.

The banished persons shall come into Sicily,
To free the forrain Nation from hunger,
In the dawning of the day the Celtes shall fail them,
Their Life shall be preserved, the King shall submit to reason.

ANNOT.

It is hard to judge what he meaneth by that Forreign Nation, which shall be relieved in Sicily, by the banished, nor what King is that which shall submit to reason; let it be left to every body’s private judgement.

[91]

LXXII.

French.

Armée Celtique en Italie vexée,
De toutes partes conflit & grande perte,
Romains fuis O Gaule repoulsée,
Pres du Thesin, Rubicon pugne incerte.

English.

The French Army shall be vexed in Italy,
On all sides fighting, and great loss,
The Romans run away, and thou France repulsed,
Near the Thesin, by Rubicon the fight shall be doubtful.

ANNOT.

A French Army shall be distressed, if not destroyed in Italy. The Romans, that is, those under the Pope, that shall take their part, shall be put to flight, and this battle shall be fought by the River Thesin. Another shall be fought by the River Rubicon, whose event shall be doubtful, that is to say, it shall hardly be known who got the victory.

LXXIII.

French.

Au Lac Fucin de Benacle Rivage,
Pres du Leman au port de Lorguion,
Nay de trois Bras prædit Bellique Image,
Par trois courones au grand Endymion.

English.

At the Fucin Lake of the Benacle Shore,
Near the Leman, at the Port of Lorguion,
Born with three Arms, a Warlike Image,
By three Crowns to the great Endimion.

ANNOT.

There is a Lake in Italy called Lacus Fucinius; the Lake of Geneva is called Lacus Lemanus; the meaning then of this obscure Stanza, is, (if I understand any thing) that a Monster shall be born with three Arms, near one of those Lakes, which shall be a sign of great Wars: what he meaneth by the three Crowns to the great Endymion, is unknown to me.

LXXIV.

French.

De Sens, d’Autun viendront jusques au Rhosne,
Pour passer outre vers les Monts Pyrenée,
La gent sortir de la Marque d’Ancone,
Par Terre & Mer Suivra a grand trainées.

English.

They shall come from Sens and Autun, as far as the Rhosne,
To go further to the Pyrenean Mountains,
The Nation come from the Mark of Ancona,
By Land and Sea shall follow speedily after.

[92]

ANNOT.

Sens and Autun are two Cities in France, the Pyrenean Mountains, are those which divide France from Spain.

LXXV.

French.

La voix ouie de l’Insolit oiseau,
Sur le Canon du respiral estage,
Si haut viendra du froment le boisseau,
Que l’homme d’homme sera Antropophage.

English.

The noise of the unwonted Bird having been heard,
Upon the Canon of the highest story,
The Bushel of Wheat shall rise so high,
That man of man shall be Antropophage.

ANNOT.

This is a prediction of a mighty Famine, wherein men shall eat up one another, when an unwonted Bird shall be seen and heard to cry, being perched upon one of the biggest pieces of Ordinance.

Antropophage is a Greek word, signifying a Man-eater, from ἄνθροπος, homo, and φαγος, comedens, of which sort of men there be too many already.

LXXVI.

French.

Foudre en Bourgongne avec cas portenteux,
Que par engin oncques ne pourroit faire,
De leur Senat Sacriste fait boiteux,
Fera Scavoir aux ennemis l’affaire.

English.

Lightning in Burgundy, with marvellous accidents,
Which could never have been done by art,
Of their Senate Sacriste being lamed,
Shall make known the business to the enemies.

ANNOT.

The Senate or Parliament of Burgundy, sits at Dijon, among them there is always a Church-man, that is one of the Judges, to see that nothing be done to the prejudice of the Church. I suspect that it is he, that is called here Sacriste, and who shall reveal the business to the Enemies. The two first Verses need no explication.

LXXVII.

French.

Par Arcs, Fœux, Poix, & par feux repoussez,
Cris hurlemens sur la minuit ouys,
Dedans sont mis par les rempars cassez,
Par Canicules les Traditeurs fuis.
[93]

English.

Being repulsed with Bows, Fires, and Pitch,
Cries and howlings shall be heard about midnight,
They shall get in through the broken Walls,
The betrayers shall run away through the Conduits.

ANNOT.

It is a Town Besieged, where after a repulse given to the Besiegers, they shall get in by the Treason of some within, who shall run away through the Conduits or Channels of the Town.

LXXVIII.

French.

Le grand Neptune du profond de la Mer,
De sang punique & sang Gaulois meslé,
Les Isles a sang pour le tardif ramer,
Plus luy nuira que loccult mal celé.

English.

The great Neptune in the middle of the Sea,
Having joyned African and French blood,
The Islands shall be put to the Sword, and the slow rowing
Shall do them more prejudice, than the concealed evil.

ANNOT.

To understand this, you must know that Henry the II. King of France, having renewed his Alliance with the Grand Seignior Sultan Solyman, he asked him succours for to take Nice, which he pretended to belong to the Earldom of Provence. To that purpose the Marshal of Brissac went from Court with the Kings Army in the year 1557. to set upon Nice, Savona, and Genoa, and so to hinder the Spaniard from coming by Sea in Piemont, and the Milanese. The Turk sent him a good Fleet, consisting of 105. Galleys, and 14. Galliots.

The French Fleet consisted of 26 Galleys, of which the great Prior was Admiral, who went with them from the Castle of Yf, the 9. of June 1558.

Being at Sea, and not knowing where the Turkish Fleet was, he went to and fro to seek it out, at last he found it pillaging and plundering the Island of Minorica. The Turks had already taken the chief Town, where 800. Turks were killed, which so incensed the rest, that they set the Town on fire; then going up and down the Countrey, they took 5000. Prisoners, and if the Lords of Carces and Vence had not stayed them, they would have ruinated the whole Island.

Then forsaking the Island, they joyned with the French, but the perfidious Bassa being bribed by the Genoeses, and those of Nice, went slowly to work, and at last retreated without doing any thing for the French. This is the relation of Cæsar Nostradamus, in his History of Provence under Henry the II. and according to this the Author saith, that the great Neptune in the middle of the Sea, shall joyn French and African blood. Neptune signifieth the Mediterranean Sea.

The Islands shall be put to the Sword, by the taking of Minorica, after which the Turks being bribed, went slowly to work, and in conclusion did nothing of consequence.

The third and fourth Verse adds, that this Bassa’s slow rowing, shall do them more prejudice then the concealed evil; that is, shall do more damage to the French by his hidden[94] design of the Bassa of not serving the French; because this slowness of the Bassa spoiled the French activity, lessened their provisions, and at last discouraged them; whereas if the Turks had not come, the French Galleys alone were able to take Nice.

LXXIX.

French.

La Barbe crespe & noire par engin,
Subjuguera la gent cruelle & fiere,
Le grand Cheyren ostera du longin,
Tous les Captifs par Seline Baniere.

English.

The frizled and black Beard by fighting,
Shall overcome the fierce and cruel Nation,
The great Cheyren shall free from Bands,
All the Captives made by Selyne Standard.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy was fulfilled in the year 1571. upon the seventh day of October, when that famous Battle of Lepanto was fought between the Christians and the Turks, the General of the Christians being Don Juan of Austria, whom he calleth here the frizled and black Beard.

In this Battle the Christians lost 7566. men, and the Turks about 32000. besides 220. Ships of all sorts, and all the Christian slaves released that were in them. By the Selyne Banner is understood that of the great Turk, whose name at that time was Selyne. By the great Cheyren is understood Henry the II. King of France, who redeemed many slaves, for Cheyren by transposition of Letters is Henry.

LXXX.

French.

Apres conflit du læse l’Eloquence,
Par peu de temps se trame Saint repos,
Point l’on admet les grand a delivrance.
Des ennemis sont remis a propos.

English.

After the Battle, the eloquency of the wounded man,
Within a little while shall procure a holy rest,
The great ones shall not be delivered,
But shall be left to their Enemies will.

ANNOT.

After the Battle of St. Laurence, the Prisoners taken by the Spaniard were the Constable of France, the Dukes of Montpensier, of Longueville, the Marshal S. André, Ludovic Prince of Mantua, the Rhingrave Colonel of the Germans, the Earl of la Rochefoucaud, and several other persons of quality.

They were Prisoners from the 10th of August 1557. to the third of April 1559. that is, one year and eight Months; during which time the Pope’s Nuncios, Christierne Dutchess Dowager of Lorraine, the Constable, and Marshal St. André endeavoured to make the peace.

[95]

Among them the Constable was chief, and Philip the II. King of Spain gave him leave to go to and fro upon his Paroll; and of him it is our Author speaketh in the first Verse; After the Battle the eloquency of the wounded man, that is after the Battle of Saint Laurence, where the Constable of Monmorency was wounded in the hip. His eloquency procured the peace, which was concluded in a short time, for had it not been for the death of Queen Mary of England, that happened upon the 15 of November 1558. it should have been concluded three Months after the conference that was begun in the Abbey of Cercamp near Cambray.

The third Verse saith, that the great ones shall not be delivered, because during the Treaty of Peace, Philip the II. would not hearken to take any Ransom, but they were kept Prisoners till the Peace. It is the meaning of the fourth Verse, when it saith, but shall be left to the Enemies will, viz. the Spaniards who gave them liberty after the Peace.

LXXXI.

French.

Par feu du Ciel la Cité presqu’aduste,
L’Urne menace encor Deucalion,
Vexée Sardaigne par la punique fuste,
Apres le Libra lairra son Phaeton.

English.

By fire from Heaven the City shall be almost burnt,
The Waters threatens another Deucalion,
Sardaigne shall be vexed by an African Fleet,
After that Libra shall have left her Phaeton.

ANNOT.

All is plain but the last Verse, the sense of which is, that the things before spoken, shall happen when the Sun is newly come out of the sign of Libra.

LXXVII.

French.

Par faim la proye fera Loup prisonier,
L’Assaillant lors en extresme detresse,
Lesnay ayant au devant le dernier,
Le grand neschape au milieu de la presse.

English.

By hunger, the prey shall make the Wolf prisoner,
Assaulting him then in a great distress,
The eldest having got before the last,
The great one doth not escape in the middle of the crowd.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses signifie, that an hungry Wolf seeking for a Prey, shall be caught in some trap, where being almost famished, the Prey shall assault him. The last two Verses being obscure and not material to any thing I have neglected them.

[96]

LXXXIII.

French.

Le gros Traffic d’un grand Lion changé,
La pluspart tourne en pristine ruine,
Proye aux Soldats par playe vendangé,
Par Jura Mont, & Sueve bruine.

English.

The great Trade of a great Lion alter’d,
The most part turneth into its former ruine,
Shall become a Prey to Soldiers and reaped by wound,
In Mont-Jura, and Suaube great Foggs.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is concerning the City of Lion in France, which is a Town of an exceeding great Trade, and is threatned to suffer an alteration, and a decay by War.

The last Verse is concerning a great Mist or Fogg, which shall be upon Mont-Jura and in Suabeland.

LXXXIV.

French.

Entre Campagne, Sienne, Pise & Ostié,
Six mois neuf jours ne pleuvra une goute,
L’Estrange Langue en Terre Dalmatie,
Courira sus vastant la Terre toute.

English.

Between Campania, Sienna, Pisa and Ostia,
For six Months and nine days there shall be no rain,
The strange Language in Dalmatia’s Land,
Shall overrun, spoiling all the Countrey.

ANNOT.

All those places mentioned, in the first Verse are seated in Italy; the Author saith that in that Countrey it shall not rain for the space of six Months and nine days, which if it be past, or to come, I know not.

The two last Verses signifie, that a strange Nation shall come into Dalmatia, and overrun and spoil all that Countrey.

LXXXV.

French.

Le vieux plein barbe soubs le statut severe,
A Lion fait dessus l’Aigle Celtique,
Le petit grand trop outre persevere,
Bruit d’Arme au Ciel, Mer rouge Ligustique.
[97]

English.

The old plain beard under the severe Statute,
Made at Lion upon the Celtique Aigle,
The little great persevereth too far,
Noise of Arms in the Skie, the Ligustrian Sea made red.

ANNOT.

I could scrape no sense out of the first three Verses; the last signifieth, that a noise of Arms shall be heard in the Skies, and that the Ligustrian Sea, which is that of Genoa, shall be made red with blood, when the former prodigy hath appeared.

LXXXVI.

French.

Naufrage a classe pres d’Onde Adriatique,
La Terre tremble emeue sur l’Air en Terre mis
Ægypt tremble augment Mahometique,
L’Heraut soy rendre a crier est commis.

English.

A Fleet shall suffer Shipwrack near the Adriatick Sea,
The Earth quaketh, a motion of the Air cometh upon the Land,
Ægypt trembleth for fear of the Mahometan increase.
The Herald surrendring shall be appointed to cry.

ANNOT.

In the two first Verses is foretold a great storm by the Adriatick Sea, in which a Fleet shall be dispersed, and many suffer Shipwrack.

The two last Verses relate the great fear Ægypt was in, when the great Turk Sultan Selyn went to conquer it.

The last Verse is concerning a Herald, which was surrendered to the contrary party, and by them was appointed to perform that office in their behalf.

LXXXVII.

French.

Apres viendra des extremes Contrées,
Prince Germain dessus Throsne d’Oré,
La servitude & les Eaux rencontrées,
La Dame serve son temps plus n’adoré.

English.

After that shall come out of the remote Countreys,
A German Prince upon a gilded Throne,
The slavery and waters shall meet,
The Lady shall serve, her time no more worshipped.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is concerning Gustavus Adolphus King of Swedeland, who is called German Prince, because his Ancestors came out of Germany, he came out of a remote Countrey, that is Swedeland, he came upon a gilded Throne, that is a Ship gilded, he shall make slavery and waters meet, because as soon as he was Landed he began to conquer, and to subdue that Lady (viz. Germania) that was no more worshipped since as she was before.

[98]

LXXXVIII.

French.

Le Circuit du grand fait ruineux,
Le nom septiesme du cinquiesme sera,
D’un tiers plus grand l’estrange belliqueux,
De Ram, Lutece, Aix ne garentira.

English.

The circumference of the ruinous building,
The seventh name shall be that of the fifth,
From a third, one greater, a Warlike man,
Aries shall not preserve Paris nor Aix.

ANNOT.

The Circumference of that ruinous building, was the French league against Henry III. and Henry IV. which numbers being joyned together, make seven, mentioned in the second Verse.

By the strange Warlike man, in the third Verse, is understood Henry IV. because he was not born in France, but in Navarre, and therefore called a stranger, who subdued both Paris and Aix, seated under the constellation of Aries. If you had not rather, by the name of the Ram, or Aries, understand the Duke of Mayenne, who was head of the league.

LXXXIX.

French.

Un jour seront amis les deux grands Maistres,
Leur grand pouvoir se verra augmenté,
La Terre neufue sera en ses hauts estres,
Au sanguinaire le nombre raconté.

English.

One day the two great Masters shall be friends,
Their great power shall be increased,
The new Land shall be in a flourishing condition,
The number shall be told to the bloody person.

ANNOT.

We must suppose here three Kings of Europe, two of which shall become friends, and by their agreement, the new Land, that is, either the Plantations, or the Trade either in the East or West Indies, shall flourish, their prosperities shall be related and told to the third King, who shall be a bloody and cruel man.

XC.

French.

Par vie & mort changé Regne d’Hungrie,
La loy sera plus aspre que service,
Leur grand Cité d’Urlemens plaine & crie,
Castor & Pollux ennemis dans la Lice.
[99]

English.

By Life and Death the Kingdom of Hungary shall be changed,
The Law shall be more severe than the service,
Their great City shall be full of howling and crying,
Castor and Pollux shall be enemies in the List.

ANNOT.

There shall happen a great change in the Kingdom of Hungary, caused by the birth of one, and the death of another.

The meaning of the second Verse is, that it will be more tolerable to go to War, than to Law.

The last verse signifieth, that this dissention shall happen between two Brothers; because Castor and Pollux were such.

XCI.

French.

Soleil levant ungrand feu lon verra,
Bruit & clarté vers Aquilon tendans,
Dedans le rond mort & cris lon orra,
Par Glaive, Feu, Faim, mort les attendans.

English.

At the rising of the Sun a great fire shall be seen,
Noise and light tending towards the North,
Within the round death and cries shall be heard,
Death by Sword, Fire, Hunger watching for them.

ANNOT.

These are Prodigies that shall be seen, a little before that a great Calamity shall happen.

XCII.

French.

Feu couleur d’or, du Ciel en terre veu,
Frappé du haut nay, fait cas merveilleux,
Grand meurtre humain, prinse du grand Neveu,
Morts de spectacles, eschapé lorgueilleux.

English.

A fire from Heaven of a Golden colour shall be seen,
Stricken by the high born, a wonderful case,
Great murder of Mankind, the taking of the great Neveu,
Some dead looking, the proud one shall escape.

ANNOT.

This is a continuation of the former, relating more Prodigies that are to happen.

[100]

XCIII.

French.

Aupres du Tybre bien pres la Lybitine,
Un peu devant grand Inondation,
Le chef du nef prins, mis a la sentine,
Chasteau, Palais en conflagration.

English.

Near the Tyber, going towards Lybia,
A little before a great Innundation,
The Master of the Ship being taken shall be put into the Sink,
And a Castle and Palace shall be burnt.

ANNOT.

This is plain.

XCIV.

French.

Grand Pau, grand mal par Gaulois recevra,
Vaine terreur au Maritin Lion,
Peuple infiny par la Mer passera,
Sans eschaper un quart d’un Million.

English.

Great Pau shall receive great harm by the French,
A vain terrour shall seize upon the Maritine Lion,
Infinite people shall go beyond Sea,
Of which shall not escape a quarter of a Million.

ANNOT.

The first Verse signifieth that the Countrey about the Pau, (which is the greatest River in Italy) shall receive great damage by the French.

The second, that the Maritine Lion, viz. the Hollanders shall fear in vain. The third and fourth are plain.

XCV.

French.

Les lieux peuplez seront inhabitables,
Pour Champs avoir grande division,
Regnes livrez a prudents incapables,
Lors les grands Freres mort & dissension.

English.

The populous places shall be deserted,
A great division to obtain Fields,
Kingdoms given to prudents incapable,
When the great Brothers shall die by dissention.

[101]

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

XCVI.

French.

Flambeau ardant au Ciel soir sera veu,
Pres de la fin & principe du Rhosne,
Famine, Glaive, tard le secours pourveu,
La Perse tourne envahir Macedoine.

English.

A burning shall be seen by night in Heaven,
Near the end and beginning of the Rhosne,
Famine, Sword, too late succours shall be provided,
Persia shall come against Macedonia.

ANNOT.

This is easie.

XCVII.

French.

Romain Pontife garde de taprocher,
De la Cité que deux fleuves arrouse,
Ton sang viendras aupres de la cracher,
Toy & les tiens quand fleurira la Rose.

English.

Roman Pontife take heed to come near,
To the City watered with two Rivers,
Thou shall spit there thy blood,
Thou and thine, when the Rose shall blossom.

ANNOT.

Although there may be many Cities watered with two Rivers, yet I know none more famous than Lions in France, where two famous Rivers, the Rhosne and the Saone meet together, and I believe this is the place that our Author forewarneth the Pope to come to, for fear of his death, and that of his attendants.

XCVIII.

French.

Celuy du sang respersé le visage,
De la Victime proche du Sacrifice,
Venant en Leo, augure par presage,
Mis estre a mort alors pour la fiance.

English.

He that shall have his face bloody,
With the blood of the Victim near to be sacrificed,
The Sun coming into Leo shall be an Augury by presage,
That then he shall be put to death for his confidence.

[102]

ANNOT.

I suppose this to be spoken of a Jewish Priest, who going about to practice the Ceremonial Law, in a Countrey where it is forbidden, shall be put to death for his bold confidence.

XCIX.

French.

Terroir Romain qu’interpretoit Augure,
Par gent Gauloise par trop sera vexée,
Mais Nation Celtique craindra l’heure,
Boreas, classe trop loing l’avoit poussée.

English.

The Roman Countrey in which the Augur did interpret,
Shall be too much vexed by the French Nation,
But the Celtique Nation shall fear the hour,
The Northwind had driven the Navy in too far.

ANNOT.

Since the Reign of Henry the II. King of France, the Historians do not mention that the Countrey about Rome hath been troubled by the French Armies. It was only in the time of Paul the IV. who was assisted by the French Troops, under the conduct of the Lord Strozy, and Captain Monluc, therefore this Stanza belongeth to the time of that Kings Reign.

And indeed what he foretelleth here, came to pass in the year 1556. for the Countrey about Rome was vexed by the French Nation, who went about then to take the places, which the Duke of Alba had taken from the Pope, and thereby caused those disorders, which commonly are incident to War.

The second Verse saith, the Countrey shall be too much vexed, and not a little, because Monluc, whom the Author calleth the quick Gascon, did continually torment the Enemies, which could not be done without a great prejudice to the Countrey; Moreover, his Troops being for the most part Gascons, and consequently active men; the Soldiers did more harm than ordinary.

In the first Verse he saith, that this Countrey about Rome was marked by an Augury, to be the place upon which the sad effect of the Augury should fall, which proved true; for the first of March 1556, appeared a Blazing Star, which did presage to that Countrey of Rome, its disaster.

Roman Countrey in which the Augur did interpret, that is to say, which the Augur did signifie, and presage should be vexed by the French Nation.

Afterwards the Author saith, that the same French Nation, or Celtique, shall fear the hour when Boreas should drive to far the Fleet, that is to say, shall fear much, when the Baron de la Garde was so troubled with the storm (as we have said) and in truth it was Boreas, or the Northwind, that drove him into St. Florents road.

[103]

C.

French.

Dedans les Isles si horrible tumulte,
Rien on n’orra qu’une bellique brigue,
Tant grand sera des predareurs l’Insult,
Qu’on se viendra ranger a la grand ligue.

English.

In the Islands shall be so horrid tumults,
That nothing shall be heard but a Warlike surprise,
So great shall be the insult of the Robbers,
That every one shall shelter himself under the great League.

ANNOT.

This is plain, if by the great League, you understand the soundest and most powerful party.


[104]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY III.

I.

French.

Apres Combat & Bataille Navale,
Le grand Neptune a son plus haut beffroy,
Rouge adversaire de peur de viendra pasle,
Mettant le grand Occean en effroy.

English.

After the fight and Sea Battle,
The great Neptune in his highest Steeple,
The red adversary shall wax pale for fear,
Putting the great Occean in a fright.

ANNOT.

I find no mystical sence in this, unless by the red adversary he should understand the Pope, because clothed in Scarlet. Therefore I leave the explication to the judgement of every particular Reader.

[105]

II.

French.

Le Divin Verbe donra a la substance,
Compris Ciel, Terre, or occult au lait mystique,
Corps, Ame, Esprit, ayant toute puissance,
Tant sous ses pieds comme au Siege Celique.

English.

The Divine Word shall give to the substance,
Heaven and Earth, and Gold hid in the mystical milk,
Body, Soul, Spirit, having all power,
As well under his feet, as in the Heavenly Seat.

ANNOT.

I desire the judicious Reader, and chiefly if he be given to the Hermetick Philosophy, to take a special notice of this Stanza, for in it is contained the secret of the Elixir or Philosophers Stone, more clearly and plainly then in the Tabula Smaragdina of Hermes, which to make appearent, we shall expound it Verse by Verse.

The Divine Word shall give to the substance; by the Divine word you must not understand the second person of the Trinity, but a Doctor in Divinity or a Theologian, called in Greek θεόλογος or Divine word, who shall be an Adeptus, a Disciple of Hermes, and one that shall attain to the secret of the Philosophers stone.

That man shall give to the substance, that is, to Gold; Heaven and Earth, and gold hid in the mystical Milk. Heaven and Earth, that is all the Celestial and Terrestrial qualities, lurking in the Gold, which is hid in the mystical milk, that is in the Azoth, or Mercury of the Philosophers.

Body, Soul, Spirit, having all Power, that is, the three principles, of which the Philosophers say their stone is compounded, viz. Body, Soul, and Spirit.

Having all Power, that is, having the power to transmute all Mettals into its kind; as also having all the powers from above and below, as Hermes saith, Pater ejus est Sol, Mater vero Luna, & Terra nutrix ejus.

Which is confirmed by the last Verse, As well under his feet, as in the Heavenly Seat.

III.

French.

Mars & Mercure, & Largent joint ensemble,
Vers le Midy extreme siccité,
Au fond d’Asie on dira Terre tremble,
Corinthe, Ephese lors en perplexite.

English.

Mars and Mercury, and Silver joyned together,
Towards the South a great drought,
In the bottome of Asia shall be an Earth-quake,
Corinth and Ephesus shall then be in perplexity.

[106]

ANNOT.

After the Author hath in the foregoing Stanza expressed the mistery of the Philosophers stone, he seemeth to give here a receit, though Sophistical, for the relief of the Inquisitors, and as it were a Viaticum, for them to subsist till they can attain to the perfection, as Basilius, Valentinus hath done since to his disciples.

He saith then, that with Mars, that is, Iron, Mercury and Silver joyned together, some thing may be done, if you beware of a drought in the South; that is, in the middle of the operation; and this is concerning the two first Verses. Those that shall desire to be better and further informed, may come to me, and they shall have all the satisfaction I can afford them.

The two last Verses have no relation to the first two, and foretel onely a great Earthquake in Asia, by which, those two Towns, Corinth and Ephesus, shall be in great perplexity.

IV.

French.

Quand seront proches le defaut des Lunaires,
De l’un a lautre ne distant grandement,
Froid, siccité, dangers vers les frontieres,
Mesme ou l’Oracle a pris commencement.

English.

When the want of the Luminaries shall be near,
Not being far distant one from another,
Cold, drought, danger towards the Frontiers,
Even where the Oracle had his beginning.

ANNOT.

The word near, sheweth that the two Eclipses, one of the Sun and the other of the Moon, shall be near one another.

The Ephemerides of John Stadius, teach us, that in the year 1556 in the Month of November, these two Eclipses did meet. That of the Sun upon the first of November, at 17 hours (as the Astrologers reckon) and 53 Minutes. That of the Moon at 12 hours and 43 Scruples; and thus the two last Verses are plain.

Concerning the other two: Belleforest teacheth us two things; the first, that the same year was extraordinary dry, in so much that from April to October it did not rain, but only upon the Eve of St. John the Baptist, and that the Vintage was made in August, the Wine proving excellent. The second is, that in the Month of December began a horrid Frost, which lasted a great while. Thus there was Cold and drought.

Concerning the dangers towards the Frontiers, Belleforest saith, that towards Pickardy the Spaniard began to break the truce, making inrodes about Abbeville, St. Spirit of Rue, la Chapele, Rozoy, Thierasse, and Aubenton.

When complaints were made of it, they alledged their necessity and want of Victuals; which did oblige the Lord Admiral to permit the Souldiers retaliation; and in this manner, there was danger towards the Frontiers.

As for the Town where the Oracle (that is, our Author) had his beginning or birth, whether it be that of St. Remy or Salon de Craux. The dangers that were there, proceeded from the Civil Wars between the Protestants and the Roman Catholicks.

[107]

V.

French.

Pres le defaut des deux grands luminaires,
Qui surviendra entre l’Avril & Mars,
O quel cherté! mais deux grands debonnaires,
Par Terre & Mer secourront toutes parts.

English.

Near the Ecclipses of the two great Luminaries,
Which shall happen between April and March,
O what a dearth! but two great ones bountiful,
By Land and Sea shall succour them on all sides.

ANNOT.

There shall happen two great Ecclipses between March and April, one of the Sun, and the other of the Moon; then shall be a great dearth, but the afflicted shall be relieved by the two powerful Princes of a good Nature.

VI.

French.

Dans Temple clos le foudre y entrera.
Des Citadins dedans leur fort grevez,
Chevaux, Bœufs, Hommes, l’Onde mur touchera,
Par faim, soif, soubs les plus foibles armez.

English.

Into a close Church the lightning shall fall,
The Citizens shall be distressed in their Fort,
Horses, Oxen, Men, the Water shall touch the Wall,
By hunger, thirst, down shall come the worst provided.

ANNOT.

This is plain.

VII.

French.

Les fugitifs, feu du Ciel sur les Piques,
Conflit prochain des Corbeaux sesbatans,
De Terre on crie, aide, secours Celiques,
Quand pres des murs seront les combatans.

English.

The runaways, fire of Heaven upon the Pikes,
A fight near hand, the Ravens sporting,
They cry from the Land, succours O Heavenly powers
When near the walls shall be the fighting men.

[108]

ANNOT.

The first Verse signifieth, that there shall be some Fugitives, upon whose Pikes the Lightning shall fall.

The second, that when a multitude of Ravens shall be sporting, a great fight shall be near hand.

The third, that there shall be a great exclamation and prayers, when the Souldiers shall come near the wall to give an assault.

VIII.

French.

Les Cimbres joints avecques leurs voisins,
Depopuler viendront presque l’Espagne,
Gens ramassez, Guienne & Limosins,
Seront en ligue & leur feront Compagne.

English.

The Cimbres joyned with their neighbours,
Shall come to depopulate almost all Spain,
People gathered from Guienna and Limosin,
Shall be in league with them, and keep them Company.

ANNOT.

The Cimbres and Teutons were a Northern people, viz: the Swedes and Danes, who came once out of their Countrey to sack Rome, and were overcome by Marius, near the Town of Orenge, in a place where his Triumphal Arch is seen to this day. The rest is easie.

IX.

French.

Bourdeaux, Rouan & la Rochelle joints,
Tiendront autour la grand Mer Occeane,
Anglois Bretons, & les Flamans conjoints,
Les chasseront jusque aupres de Rouane.

English.

Bourdeaux, Rouan, and Rochel joyned together,
Will range about upon the great Ocean,
English Brittans, and Flemings joyned together,
Shall drive them away as far as Rouane.

ANNOT.

By mentioning Bourdeaux, Rouan, and Rochel, the Author understandeth the whole Naval forces of France, which (he saith) shall be defeated, by the English, Brittains, and Hollanders, and pursued as far as Rouane, which is a Town at the head of the River Loire, from whence it runneth down for the space of 500 Miles to Nantes, and a while after dischargeth it self into the Ocean.

[109]

X.

French.

De sang & faim plus grand calamité,
Sept fois sapreste a la Marine plage,
Monech de faim, lieu pris, captivité,
Le grand mené, Croc, enserré en cage.

English.

Of blood and famine, what a great calamity!
Seven times is ready to come upon the Sea Coast,
Monech by hunger, the place taken, captivity,
The great one carried away, Croc, shut up in a Cage.

ANNOT.

Monech or Monaco is a Town and Principality belonging to the Family of the Grimaldi of Genua, and is seated by the Sea side, between Provence and Genoa; that place is threatned here with many afflictions, as is plain in this Stanza.

XI.

French.

Les Armées battre au Ciel longue saison,
L’Arbre au milieu de la Cité tombé,
Vermine, Rogne, Glaive en face tison,
Lors le Monarque d’Adrie succombé.

English.

Armies shall fight in the Air a great while,
The tree shall fall in the middle of the City,
Vermin, Scabs, Sword, fire-brand in the face,
When the Monarck of Adria shall fall.

ANNOT.

The three first Verses contain several prodigies, that shall happen before the death of the Duke of Venice, or rather (because he is no Monarck) before the fall of that Monarchy or Common-wealth.

XII.

French.

Par la tumeur du Heb. Po. Tag. Tibre de Rome,
Et par lestang Leman & Aretin,
Les deux grands chefs, & Citez de Garonne,
Prins, Morts, Noiez. Partir humain butin.

English.

By the swelling of Heb. Po. Tag. Tiber of Rome,
And by the Lake Leman and Aretin,
The two great Heads, and Cities of Garonne,
Taken, Dead, Drowned. The human booty shall be divided.

[110]

ANNOT.

Heb. is the River Hebrus in Thracia, Po, is the great River of Italy, Tag. is Tagus, the River of Lisbonne; the rest is plain.

XIII.

French.

Par Foudre en Arche Or & Argent fondu,
De deux Captifs l’un l’autre mangera,
De la Cité le plus grand estendu,
Quand submergée la Classe nagera.

English.

By Lightning shall gold and silver be melted in the Arch,
Of two Prisoners one shall eat up the other,
The greatest of the City shall be laid down,
When the Navy that was drowned shall swim.

ANNOT.

The words and the sense are plain.

XIV.

French.

Par le Rameau du vaillant personage,
De France infirme, par le Pere infelice,
Honeurs, Richesses, travail en son viel Age,
Pour avoir creu le conseil d’homme nice.

English.

By the Bow of the valliant men,
Of weak France, by the unfortunate Father,
Honours, Riches, labour in his old age,
For having believed the councel of a nice man.

ANNOT.

Every body may understand this as well as I do.

XV.

French.

Cœur, vigueur, gloire, le Regne changera,
De tous points contre, ayant son adversaire,
Lors France enfance par mort subjuguera,
Un grand Regent sera lors plus contraire.

English.

Heart, vigour, and glory shall change the Kingdom,
In all points, having an adversary against it,
Then shall France overcome Childhood by death,
A great Regent shall then be more adversary to it.

[111]

ANNOT.

The two first Verses seem to have foretold of the late Tyrant Cromwel.

The two last Verses may be applied to France, when the Infant of Spain Don Balthazar died, &c.

XVI.

French.

Un Prince Anglois Mars a son cœur du Ciel,
Voudra poursuivre sa fortune prospere,
Des deux duelles l’un percera le fiel,
Hay de luy, bien aymé de sa Mere.

English.

An English Prince Mars hath his heart from Heaven,
Will follow his prosperous fortune,
Of two Duels one shall pierce the gall,
Being hated of him, and beloved of his Mother.

ANNOT.

By this Stanza is promised to England a Martial Prince, who shall have his heart from Heaven, and with all endeavours follow his prosperous fortune, which is a remarkable and commendable part in a man.

By the last two Verses, it seemeth that this Prince shall have a Son, who shall fight two duels, for one of which his Father shall be angry and hate him, but his Mother shall love him for it.

XVII.

French.

Mont Aventine brusler nuit sera veu,
Le Ciel obscur tout a un coup en Flandres,
Quand le Monarque chassera son Neveu,
Lors gens d’Eglise commettront les esclandres.

English.

Mount Aventine shall be seen to burn in the night,
The Heaven shall be darkned upon a sudden in Flanders,
When the Monarch shall expel his Neveu,
Then Churchmen shall commit scandals.

ANNOT.

Mount-Aventine is one of the seven Mountains in Rome. The rest is plain.

XVIII.

French.

Apres la pluye de lait assez longuette,
En plusieurs lieux de Rheims le Ciel touché,
O quel conflit de sang pres deux lapreste,
Pere & Fils Rois, noseront approché.
[112]

English.

After a pretty long rain of Milk,
In many places of Rhemes the lightning shall fall,
O what a bloody fight is making ready near them,
Father and Son, both Kings, shall not dare to come near.

ANNOT.

Rhemes is a City in France. The rest is easie.

XIX.

French.

En Lucques sang & lait viendra pleuvoir,
Un peu devant changement de Preteur,
Grand Peste & Guerre, Faim & soif sera voir,
Loin ou mourra leur Prince Recteur.

English.

In Luca it shall rain Blood and Milk,
A little before the change of the Magistrate,
A great Plague, War, Hunger and Thirst shall be seen,
A great way off, where their Prince Ruler shall die.

ANNOT.

Luca at present is a strong Town, and a little Common-wealth by it self in Italy, governed by their own Magistrate: That Town is threatned here to see those prodigies mentioned, a little before the change of their Government, besides a great Plague and dearth; as also the death of their chief Magistrate, who shall die far off that Countrey.

As for the raining Milk and Blood, they are Prodigies that have appeared often before, and therefore not incredible, as those that are Versed in History may justifie: and although the reasons may be drawn from natural causes, yet would they be too tedious if I should insert them here.

XX.

French.

Par les Contrées du grand flevue Betique,
Loin d’Ibere, au Royaume de Grenade,
Croix repoussées par gens Mahometiques,
Un de Cordube trahira a la fin Contrade.

English.

Through the Countreys of the great River Betis,
Far from Iberia, in the Kingdom of Granada,
Crosses beaten back by Mahometan people,
One of Corduba shall at last betray the Countrey.

ANNOT.

The great River, called in Latine Betis, and in Spanish Guadalquivir, is the River of Sevilia, the most famous Town in Spain for Trade. This River runneth through most of the Spanish Dominions, and dischargeth it self into the Ocean about the[113] mouth of the Straights, over against Barbary, upon which Coast of Spain lyeth the Kingdom of Granada, the chief City of which is Corduba, in Spanish Cordua. This Kingdom was of time almost immemorial, occupied and inhabited by the Moores, till they were expelled and driven back into Barbary, by Ferdinand and Isabella, King and Queen of Castilia. The rest is easie.

XXI.

French.

Au Crustamin pres Mer Adriatique.
Apparoistra un horrible poisson,
De face humaine & de corps aquatique,
Qui se prendra dehors de l’Hamecon.

English.

In the Crustamin near the Adriatick Sea,
An horrid Fish shall appear,
Having a mans face, and a fishes body,
Which shall be taken without a hook.

ANNOT.

I suppose this Crustamin to be some place so called, near the Adriatick Sea.

As for Fishes with an humane face, we have several examples of them. Ambrosius Paræus relateth divers, and in his works hath inserted the Pictures of them.

1. When Mena was Governour of Ægypt, and walked by the Nilus side, he saw a Sea-man rising out of the River, having an humane shape as far as the Navel, and with a grave look and fair hairs, intermixed with white ones, bony Breast, and distinct Arms, the rest of the body was like a Fish. Three days after in the Morning appeared another Sea-monster like a woman: those two Monsters appeared so long, that every body had time to consider them.

2. Rondeletius saith, that in our age was taken a Fish in the Sea of Norway, which every body presently called a Monk, because of the resemblance.

3. In the year 1531. was seen a Sea-monster, covered with Scales, which for the resemblance was called a Bishop, Rondeletius and Gesuerus have the Picture of it.

4. In the year 1523. was seen in Rome a Fish about the bigness of a Child of five years old, that had humane shape to the Navel, except the ears: So that all those things related of Tritons, Nereides and Sirens seem not altogether fabulous, and we may conclude with Pliny: Vera est vulgi opinio, quicquià nascatur in parte naturæ ulla, & in Mariesse, præterque multa quæ nusquam alibi, lib. 9. cap. 2.

XXII.

French.

Six jours lassaut devant Cité donné,
Livrée sera forte & aspre Bataille,
Trois la rendront, & a eux pardonné,
Le reste a feu & sang trauche taille.

English.

Six days shall the assault be given to the City,
A great and fierce Battle shall be fought,
Three shall surrender it and be pardoned,
The rest shall be put to fire and sword, cut and slasht.

ANNOT.

Some famous City must be here understood, which the Author hath not named. The same shall be assaulted for six days continually, and in conclusion shall be surrendred[114] or betrayed by three men, who shall be pardoned, and all the rest put to Fire and Sword. Most men that have knowledge in History, interpret this of the City of Magdebourg in Germany, that was destroyed with Fire and Sword by the Earl of Tilly, General for the Emperour against Gustavus Adolphus, King of Swedeland. For the like devastation and cruelty was never heard of in Europe.

XXIII.

French.

Si France passe outre Mer Liquistique,
Tu te verras en Isles & Mers enclos,
Mahomet contraire plus Mer l’Adriatique,
Chevaux & Asnes tu rongeras les os.

English.

If France goeth beyond the Ligustick Sea,
Thou shall see thy self inclosed with Islands and Seas,
Mahomet, against thee besides the Adriatick Sea,
Of Horses and Asses thou shalt gnaw the bones.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the miseries which the French were to suffer in the Island of Corsica, till the peace was concluded in the year 1559. The Author directeth his speech to the French Fleet that went to Corsica in the year 1555.

He saith in the first Verse, If France goeth beyond the Ligustik Sea; that is, if thou goest to Corsica, which is beyond the Ligustik Sea towards Africa. Thou shalt see thy self enclosed with Islands and Seas; that is, thou shalt be constrained to keep within those two Towns which thou hast there, without going out either by Land or Sea; not by Sea for want of Ships, nor by Land the Garrisons being weak, because the King had then so much business that he could not suffice all.

Moreover the Author addeth that Mahomet shall be contrary; not that he was an Enemy to France, but because he was then Master of the Adriatick Sea; so that the Venetians, which were then friends to the French, could not succour them.

And thus the news of the peace being brought, the French did eat their Horses and Asses, and there was never a peace so well come as to the French that were in Corsica.

XXIV.

French.

De l’Entreprise grande confusion,
Perte de gens Thresor innumerable,
Tu ny doibs faire encore tension,
France a mon dire fais que sois recordable.

English.

From the undertaking great confusion,
Loss of people and innumerable Treasury,
Thou oughtest not yet to tend that way,
France endeavour to remember my saying.

ANNOT.

This is annexed and hath relation to the precedent, therefore needeth no other interpretation.

XXV.

French.

Qui au Royaume Navarrois parviendra,
Quand la Sicile & Naples seront joints,
Bigorre & Landes par Foix lors on tiendra,
D’Un qui d’Espagne sera par trop conjoint.
[115]

English.

He that shall obtain the Kingdom of Navarre,
When Sicily and Naples shall be joyned,
Bigorre and Landes then by Foix shall beheld
Of one who shall too much be joyned to Spain.

ANNOT.

Bigorre is a Town in Gascony, the Landes is a desert Countrey about Bourdeaux wherein nothing groweth but Pine-Trees, Foix is a Country of Gascony, called the County, of Foix. The rest is easie.

XXVI.

French.

Des Rois & Princes dresseront simulachres,
Augures, creux eslevez aruspices:
Corne victime dorée, & d’Azur & de Nacre,
Intrepretez seront les extispisces.

English.

Some Kings and Princes shall set up Idols,
Divinations and hollow raised Divinators,
Victim with gilded Horns, and set with Azur and Mother of Pearl
The looking into the Entrals shall be interpreted.

ANNOT.

I can find nothing in this but a description of the Heathens sacrifices in ancient times, where they brought the Victim, that is, the beast that was to be sacrificed, trimmed in a gallant manner, having the Horns gilded, and set with Azure and Mother of Pearl, and after the Entrals were taken out, by the inspection of them they practised their Soothsaying. This inspection of Entrals was called by the Latines Extispicium, from the word Exta which signifieth Entrals, and specto which signifieth to look.

XXVII.

French.

Prince Libique puissant en Occident,
Francois d’Arabe viendra tant enflammer,
Scavant aux Lettres sera condescendent
La Langue Arabe en Francois translater.

English.

A Libian Prince being powerful in the West,
The French shall love so much the Arabian Language,
That he being a Learned man shall condescend,
To have the Arabian tongue translated into French.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is de Futuro, and is concerning a Libian Prince (now Libia is a Kingdom of Africa) who shall be a powerful man in the West, and being a lover of learning shall condescend to have the Arabian Language translated into French, because the French at that time shall be much in love with it.

XXVIII.

French.

De Terre foible & pauvre parentale,
Par boute & paix parviendra a l’Empire,
Long temps regner une jeune femelle,
Qu’oncques en Regne nen survint un si pire.
[116]

English.

One weak in Lands and of poor Kindred,
By thrusting, and peace shall attain to the Empire,
Long time shall Reign a young woman,
Such as in a Reign was never a worse.

ANNOT.

The words are so plain, that every body may interpret them.

XXIX.

French.

Les deux Neveux en divers lieux nourris,
Navale pugne, Terre peres tombez,
Viendront si haut eslevez aguerris,
Venger l’Injure ennemis succombez.

English.

The two Nephews brought up in divers places,
A Sea fight, fathers fallen to the Earth,
They shall came highly educated, and expert in Arms,
To avenge the injury, their enemies shall fall down under them.

ANNOT.

This is concerning two Nephews, who shall be educated in divers places, and grow expert in Arms, their Fathers shall be killed, but those Nephews shall come, and having fought at Sea, shall revenge the injury done to them, overcoming their enemies.

XXX.

French.

Celuy qu’en luitte & fer au fait Bellique,
Aura porte plus grand que luy le prix,
De nuit au lit six luy feront la pique,
Nud sans harnois subit sera surprins.

English.

He who in Wrestling and Martial affairs,
Had carried the prize before his better,
By night Six shall abuse him in his bed,
Being naked, and without harness, he shall suddenly be surprised.

ANNOT.

Many attribute this to the Earl of Montgomery in France, who having run a tilt against Henry II. unfortunately killed him, for which, and for being of the Protestant party, he was afterwards beheaded, though quarter had been given him.

[117]

XXXI.

French.

Aux Champs de Mede, d’Arabe, & d’Armenie,
Deux grands Copies trois fois sassembleront,
Pres du Rivage d’Araxes la mesgnie,
Du grand Soliman en Terre tomberont.

English.

In the fields of Media, Arabia, and Armenia,
Two great Armies shall meet thrice,
Near the Shore of Araxes, the people
Of great Solyman shall fall down.

ANNOT.

This signifieth no more, but the loss of three famous Battles on the Turks side, against the Persians.

The first that I find after the coming out of these Prophesies, is the Battle of Sancazan, seven miles from Tauris, and hard by the River Araxes, where 20000 Turks were slain, without any considerable loss of the Persians; this was in the time of Amurath the III. Emperour of the Turks, and son to Selyman the second. The other two Battles I could not make good, because I want the supplement of the Turkish History, as also because they have not yet happened.

XXXII.

French.

Le grand sepulchre du peuple Aquitanique,
S’aprochera aupres de la Toscane,
Quand Mars sera pres du coin Germanique,
Et au terroir de la gent Mantuane.

English.

The great grave of the Aquitanick people,
Shall come near Tuscany,
When Mars shall be in the German corner,
And in the Territory of the Mantuan people.

ANNOT.

The Lord of Thou saith in his History, that the Cardinal Caraffa got by the King of France’s permission, out of Corsica, several Troops of Gascons, and brought some with them, to the number of about 2000 which were quartered about Rome. Many of them were among the Troops of the Duke of Guise, being allured thither by the reputation of their Countreyman Captain Monluc.

The Author foretelleth, that they shall find their Graves near Tuscany, because the Territory of Rome joyneth to that Province.

Then in the 3 and 4 Verse he specifieth the time by two marks; one is, when Mars shall be near the German corner; the other, when he shall be in the Territory of the Mantuan people, and the War was then in that Territory; for the Duke of Ferrara to shew he would not stand still, sent his son Alphonso d’Este to make incursions there, and to take some places.

Moreover the War was then near the German corner, which is Lorrain, when[118] Henry II. besieged Thionville in the year 1558. Paradin sheweth, that Mars was in the German corner two years before, sith about the end of the year 1555; the Duke of Nevers by an extraordinary endeavour in the middle of the Winter, did relieve Mariembourg: and the following years the French Garrisons kept the fields to avoid surprises. And in the year 1557. when the Duke of Guise fought in Italy, the Duke of Savoy brought his Army against Mariembourg; so it proved true that Mars, viz. the War was in the German corner; for that Town is in the borders of Germany, and was in that corner till the taking of Thionville.

XXXIII.

French.

En la Cité ou le loup entrera,
Bien pres de la les ennemis seront,
Copie estrange grand pais gastera,
Aux Monts des Alpes les amis passeront.

English.

In the City wherein the Wolf shall go,
Near that place the enemies shall be,
An Army of strangers shall spoil a great Countrey,
The friends shall go over the Mountains of the Alpes.

ANNOT.

The two last Verses make me think that this Prophesie was fulfilled in the time of Henry II. King of France, because the French being then friends to the Pope, went over the Alpes to serve him.

This Stanza might also be applyed to Lewis 13, who caused his Army to go beyond the Alpes, but that word Friends is more convenient to the time of Henry II. because the French went then over the Alpes in quality of friends to serve the Pope.

According to this conjecture, the wolf which signifieth the Spaniard, came anno 1556. into many Towns, which the Duke of Alba took, as we have said in another place, and because among those Towns Neptune was one of the most considerable, being seated by the Sea side near Rome: I believe that by this word City he meaneth that Town which belonged to the Colonese.

And to say truth, the French were then very near it, to endeavour the relief of it.

Afterwards came the Duke of Guise’s Army, which is named by the Author, an Army of strangers, because the French and Germans are strangers to Italy. This Army shall spoil a great Countrey; for in that year it went through all Italy, and where an Army passeth, nothing but ruine can be expected.

XXXIV.

French.

Quand le defaut du Soleil lors sera,
Sur le plein jour le Monstre sera veu,
Tout autrement on l’Interpretera,
Cherté na garde, nul ny aura pourveu.
[119]

English.

When the Ecclipse of the Sun shall be
At noon day, the Monster shall be seen,
It shall be interperted otherways,
Then for a dearth, because no body hath provided against it.

ANNOT.

The sense of this is, that when the Sun shall be Eclipsed at noon, a Monster shall be born, which shall presage a dearth, though no body will believe it, because they were unprovided against it.

XXXV.

French.

Du plus profond de l’Occident d’Europe,
De pauvre gens un jeune enfant naistra,
Qui par sa langue seduira grande troupe,
Son bruit au Regne d’Orient plus croistra.

English.

Out of the deepest part of the West of Europe,
From poor people a young child shall be born,
Who with his tongue shall seduce many people,
His fame shall increase in the Eastern Kingdom.

ANNOT.

This needeth no explication.

XXXVI.

French.

Ensevely non mort Apoplectique,
Sera trouvé avoir les mains mangees,
Quand la Cité damnera l’Heretique,
Qu’avoit leur Loix ce leur sembloit changees.

English.

One buried, not dead, but Apoplectical,
Shall be found to have eaten up his hands,
When the City shall blame the heretical man,
Who as they thought had changed their Laws.

ANNOT.

Many persons (according to Histories being only in a fit of Apoplexy) have been buried for dead, and being afterwards taken out of the ground, have been found to have eaten up their hands, as I my self have seen one digged out of Saint Bartholomews Church-yard, about the time that the City of London began to be weary of Cromwels devices and Tyranny, yet I would not here definitively assert, he was the man here pointed at by the Title and Epithete of Heretical man, unless it were in the point of government.

[120]

XXXVII.

French.

Avant l’assault l’Oraison pronouncée,
Milan prins l’Aigle, par embusche deceus,
Muraille antique par Canons enfonsée,
Par feu & sang a mercy peu receus.

English.

Before the assault the Prayer shall be said,
An Eagle shall take a Kite, they shall be deceived by an Embuscado.
The ancient wall shall be beaten down with Canons,
By fire and blood, few shall have quarter.

ANNOT.

The sense of this is easie.

XXXVIII.

French.

La gent Gauloise & Nation estrange,
Outre les Monts, morts pris & profligez,
Au mois contraire & proche de vendange,
Par les Seigneurs en accord redigez.

English.

The French Nation, and another Nation,
Being over the Mountains, shall die, and be taken,
In a month contrary to them, and near the vintage,
By the Lords agreed together.

ANNOT.

Two kind of Nations were led into Italy by the Duke of Guise to succour the Pope, viz. French and Germans, meaning by the Germans all those that use the German Tongue, as Switzers, &c.

The Author saith, these two Nations were led beyond the Mountains, because they went beyond the Apennine Alpes, to come down into the Champion Countrey of Italy, where some of them died by the Sword, others by famine and sickness; others lost their liberty, being made prisoners of War, others were exposed to the inconveniences that attend a ruined Army. He addeth, that these accidents shall befall them in a Month near the Vintage, that Month is September: He calleth it Contrary, because the Grapes being ripe, the starved Souldiers did eat abundance of them, and so fell into a bloody flux. The Pope’s Tenants made use of this Stratagem to ruine that Army.

The Spaniard had his revenge the year following, for the Duke of Guise having missed his design, and being stept before Civitella, and incensed that the Pope did not keep his word with him, he resolved to go back again into France, and so the Pope did by the means of the Common-wealth of Venice, and of the Duke of Florence, it was concluded and signed with the 23 of September.

This is the Authors meaning in the 4 Verse, that all the misfortune which befell the French, was by reason of that peace; for the Pope disbanded his Troops, consisting most of French and Switzers, the greatest part of whom fell into the hands of[121] their enemies, and of the Countrey people, others died of sickness. It is true, that the Duke of Guise brought his own Army back without much loss, but the Author speaketh here of the Gascons and Switzers, that were in the Pope’s service, under the command of Marshal Strozzy, Monluc, Cardinal Caraffa, and others.

The time of this peace agreeth with the Prophesie, for it was concluded on the 23 of September, which is a Month near the Vintage.

XXXIX.

French.

Les sept en trois Mois en concorde,
Pour subjuger les Alpes Apeninnes,
Mais la tempeste & Ligure coüarde,
Les profligent en subites ruines.

English.

The seven shall agree together within three Months,
To conquer the Apennine Alpes,
But the tempest, and coward Genoese,
Shall sink them into sudden ruines.

ANNOT.

There shall be seven persons, who shall be three Months in making an agreement to go beyond the Apennines, but they shall be hindred by a tempest, and by the cowardliness of the Genoeses.

XL.

French.

Le grand Theatre se viendra redresser,
Les dez jettez & les rets ia tendus,
Trop le premier en glaz viendra lasser,
Par arc prostrais de long temps ia fendus.

English.

The great Theatre shall be raised up again,
The Dice being cast, and the nest spread,
The first shall too much in Glass.
Beaten down by Bows, who long before were split.

ANNOT.

This must be put among Insolubilia de Alliaco.

XLI.

French.

Bossu sera esleu par le Conseil,
Plus hideux Monstre en Terre napperceu,
Le coup volant luy crevera un œil,
Le traistre au Roy pour fidele receu.
[122]

English.

Crook-back shall be chosen by the Councel,
A more hideous Monster I never saw upon Earth.
The flying blow shall put out one of his eyes,
The Traitor to the King, shall be admited as faithful.

ANNOT.

This needs no explication.

XLII.

French.

L’Enfant naistra a deux dents en la gorge,
Purres en Tuscie par pluie tomberont,
peu d’ans apres ne sera Bled ny Orge,
pour saouler ceux qui de faim failleront.

English.

A Child shall be born with two Teeth in his mouth.
It shall rain stones in Tuscany,
A few years after there shall be neither Wheat nor Barley
To feed those that shall faint for hunger.

ANNOT.

Those two Prodigies mentioned in the two first Verses, do presage a great Famine that shall ensue a few years after.

XLIII.

French.

Gens d’alentour du Tar, Lot, & Garonne,
Gardez les Monts Apennins de passer,
Vostre tombeou pres de Rome & d’Ancone,
Le noir poil crespe fera Trophée dresser.

English.

People that live about the Tar, Lot, and Garonne,
Take heed to go over the Apennine Mountains,
Your Grave is near Rome and Ancona,
The black frisled hair shall dress a Trophy of you.

ANNOT.

The Tar, the Lot, and the Garone, are three Rivers of Gascony, the Inhabitants of which are forewarned not to go over the Apennine Mountains, or else they shall meet with their Graves near Rome and Ancona. This hath relation to the 38 Stanza, and to the interpretation thereof, therefore vide.

[123]

XLIV.

French.

Quand l’Animal a l’Homme domestique,
Apres grands peines & sauts viendra parler,
Le foudre a vierge sera si malefique,
De Terre prinse & suspendue en l’Air.

English.

When the Beast familiar to Mankind,
After great labour, and leaping shall come to speak,
The Lightning shall be so hurtful to a Virgin,
That she shall be taken from the Earth, and suspended in the Air.

ANNOT.

It is a Dog that shall come howling and leaping to his Mistresses friends; because she was killed and suspended in the Air by the Lightning.

XLV.

French.

Les cinq estranges entrez dedans le Temple,
Leur sang viendra la Terre prophaner,
Aux Thoulousain sera bien dur exemple,
D’un qui viendra ses loix exterminer.

English.

The five strangers having come into the Church,
The blood shall prophane the ground,
It shall be a hard example to those of Thoulouse,
Concerning one that came to break their Laws.

ANNOT.

I suppose these five strangers to be five Commissioners, for the altering something in the Government of Thoulouse, who shall be all killed in a Church, and the ground prophaned by their blood, according to the Romish opinion.

XLVI.

French.

Le Ciel (de Plancus la Cité) nous presage,
Par clercs insignes & par estoiles fixes,
Que de son change subit saproche lage,
Ne pour son bien, ne pour ses malefices.

English.

The Heaven foretelleth concerning the City of Plancus,
By famous Clerks, and fixed Stars,
That the time of her sudden change is near hand,
Neither because of her goodness, or wickedness.

[124]

ANNOT.

The City of Plancus is Lion, because he was the Founder of it. That City is threatned here of a sudden change, caused neither by her goodness or wickedness, but by a certain position and aspect of the fixed Stars, which makes it fatal.

XLVII.

French.

Le vieux Monarque dechassé de son Regne,
Aux Orients son secours ira querre,
Pour peur des Croix ploiera son Enseigne,
En Mitylene ira par Mer & par Terre.

English.

The old Monarch being expelled out of his Kingdom,
Shall go into the East to get succours,
For fear of the Crosses he shall fold up his Colours,
He shall go into Mitylene by Sea and Land.

ANNOT.

Mitylene is an Island of the Archipelago, belonging to the Turk.

XLVIII.

French.

Sept cens Captifs attachez rudement,
Pour la moitie meurtrir, donné le sort,
Le proche espoir viendra si promptement,
Mais non si tost qu’une quinziesme mort.

English.

Seven hundred prisoners shall be tied together,
To murder half of them, the lot being cast,
The next hope shall come quickly,
And not so quickly, but fifteen shall be dead before.

ANNOT.

By the next hope, he meaneth the reprieve. The rest is clear.

XLIX.

French.

Regne Gaulois tu seras bien changé,
En lieu estrange est translaté l’Empire,
En autre mœurs & Lois seras rangé,
Rouan & Chartres te feront bien du pire.
[125]

English.

French Kingdom thou shalt be much changed,
The Empire is translated in another place,
Thou shalt be put into other manners and Laws,
Rouan and Chartres shall do the worse they can to thee.

ANNOT.

Rouan is the chief City of the Province of Normandie, and Chartres the chief City of that of Beausse.

L.

French.

La Republique de la grande Cité,
A grand rigueur ne voudra consentir,
Roy sortir hors par Trompette Cité,
L’Eschelle au Mur la Cité repentir.

English.

The Common-wealth of the great City,
With great harshness shall not consent,
That the King should go out being summoned by a Trumpet,
The Ladder shall be put to the Wall, and the City repent.

ANNOT.

It is hard to know what he meaneth by the great City wherein there is a Common-wealth, whether it be Venice, Genoa, Geneva, Luca, or some of the Cities of Switzerland; but it seemeth that a King shall take shelter in it, who shall be summoned by a Trumpet to come out, but the City will not suffer it, for which the said City shall be scaled, and repent.

LI.

French.

Paris conjure un grand meurtre commettre,
Blois le fera sortir en plein effet,
Ceux d’Orleans voudront leur Chef remettre,
Angers, Troyes, Langres, leur seront un mes fait.

English.

Paris conspireth to commit a great murder,
Blois will cause it to come to pass,
Those of Orleans will set up their head again,
Angers, Troyes, Langres will do them a mischief.

ANNOT.

The Prophecy contained in the two first Verses came to pass in the time of Henry the III. King of France, when the Parisians did rebel against him, and made Barricadoes in the streets, thinking to have taken him, who was compelled to run away for his life, and fly to Chartres. This rebellion was raised and fomented by Henry of Lorraine Duke of Guise, whom the King afterwards caused to be murdered, with[126] his brother the Cardinal of Lorraine, at the Convention of the three Estates kept at Blois.

Orleans, Angers, Troyes, Langres, are remarkable Cities in France.

LII.

French.

En la Campagne sera si longue pluye,
Et en l’Apoville si grande siccité,
Coq verra l’Aigle l’aisle mal accomplie,
Par Lion mise sera en extremité.

English.

In Campania shall be so long a rain,
And in Apulia so great a drought,
The Cock shall see the Eagle with his wing disordered,
And by the Lion brought to extremity.

ANNOT.

Campania, and Apulia are two Provinces of the Kingdom of Naples.

The last two Verses of the Prophecy came to pass about the years 1630 and 1631. when Gustavus Adolphus King of Swedeland, called here the Lion, brought the Empire (signified by the Eagle) to extremity; the King of France signified by the Cock, looking upon, and underhand assisting him.

LIII.

French.

Quand le plus grand emportera le prix,
De Nuremberg, d’Ausbourg, & ceux de Basle,
Par Agripine Chef de Frankfort repris,
Traverseront par Flandres jusqu’en Gale.

English.

When the great one shall carry the prize,
Of Nuremberg, Ausbourg, and Basil,
By Agrippina the Chief of Frankfort shall be taken,
They shall go through Flanders as far as France.

ANNOT.

Nuremberg, Ausbourg, and Basil are Cities of Germany.

By Agrippine is understood the City of Cologne, called in Latine Colonia Agrippina, from the Founderess of it Agrippina, Mother of the Emperour Nero, or from M. Agrippa favourite of Augustus Cæsar.

LIV.

French.

L’un des plus grands fuira aux Espagnes,
Qu’en longue playe apres viendra seigner,
Passant Copies par les hautes Montagnes,
Devastant tout, & puis apres regner.
[127]

English.

One of the greatest shall run away into Spain,
That shall cause a wound to bleed long,
Leading Armies over the high Mountains,
Destroying all, and afterwards shall Raign.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no interpretation.

LV.

French.

En l’an qu’un œil en France Regnera,
La Cour sera en un bien fascheux trouble,
Le grand de Blois son amy tuera,
Le Regne mis en mal & doubte double.

English.

In the year that one eye shall Reign in France,
The Court shall be in a very hard trouble,
The great one of Blois shall kill his friend,
The Kingdom shall be in an ill case, and double doubt.

ANNOT.

The meaning of the first Verse is, when a King having but one eye shall Reign in France.

Blois is a City in France upon the River Loire.

LVI.

French.

Montauban, Nismes, Avignon & Besier,
Peste, Tonnerre & Gresle a fin de Mars,
De Paris Pont, de Lion Mur, Monpelier,
Depuis six cens & sept vingt, trois parts.

English.

Montauban, Nismes, Avignon and Besier,
Plague, Lightning and Hail at the end of March,
The Bridge of Paris, the Wall of Lion, and Monpelier, shall fall,
From six hundred and seven score, three parts.

ANNOT.

Montauban is a Town in Gascony, Nismes and Besiers are Towns in Languedoc; Avignon is a Town in France belonging to the Pope, which shall suffer these damages by Lightning at the end of March.

[128]

LVII.

French.

Sept fois changer verrez gens Britanique,
Teints en sang en deux cens nonante an,
France non point par appuy Germanique,
Aries double son Pope Bistarnan.

English.

Seven times you shall see the English to change,
Died in blood, in two hundred ninety year,
Not France, by the German support,
Aries doubleth his Bastarnan Pole.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses concern England; the third France; the fourth marketh the time by the motion of the Sign of Aries, which shall be favourable to France.

We shall leave the two first Verses to be interpreted by the English Nation, which is most concerned in it, and come to the last two, which concern France.

The third Verse saith that France shall not change as England, by reason of the help it shall have from Germany, which hath been made good already for these hundred years, notwithstanding the Wars between Henry II. and the Spaniard; the Conspiracy of the Protestant party against Francis the II. at Amboise; the civil Wars under Charles the IX. the League under Henry III. and Henry IV. the Forrain Wars under Lewis XIII. and Lewis XIV. now Reigning.

The Authors meaning by these words, but France not, is, you shall not see France change seven times in two hundred ninety years, as the Brittish nation, and then he giveth the reason of it, by German help, that is to say, that France shall have help from Germany.

The fourth Verse saith, that during those two hundred ninety years, Aries doubleth his Bastarnan Pole, to understand this, we must suppose first that the Sign of Aries ruleth over France, Palestine, Bastarnia, &c.

Secondly, we must learn from Ptolomy and other Geographers, that Bastarnia containeth the people that are towards Sarmatia or Poland, which were called by the Ancients, the people of Admone, Sidane, Roxolane, and by others Peucins, from the Island Peuce, which is in Istria.

Thirdly, we must suppose, that the Sign of Aries hath two Poles, the first is that of the Æquinoctial Line, and the second, that of the Eccliptick, because the Sign of Aries beginneth just in the Line of the Equator, and afterwards stretcheth towards the North. Now it is so that the place where its extension endeth in the Eccliptical Line of the Sun, is called by the Author the Bastarnan Pole.

It is a Pole sith in the constellations of Heaven, we call Poles, the two ends or extremities of them, and in the constellations of the Zodiack, we call the first Pole that which is next to the Equator, and the second Pole that which stretcheth towards the North, or towards the South in the Eccliptical Line.

In this sense, the first Pole of the Sign of Aries, is that which hath its first degree in the Equator; the second is, that which stretcheth towards the North in the Eccliptick, and this last Pole is called Bastarnan, because it is Vertical to Bastarnia, as the Astrologers set down their Climates, Kingdoms, Provinces and Towns under the twelve Signs.

[129]

Fourthly, We must suppose that this word to double, may signifie three things. 1. In Sea-mens tearms; it signifieth to go beyond some place, as to double the Cape of bona Speranza, which is called in Italian, Tramontare; that is, to go beyond. 2. It signifieth to do twice the same thing, as Jacob did double his service for Rachel, &c. 3. In matter of traveling; it signifieth to go twice as far as is requisite.

To double, in this place cannot be understood in the first sense; because the constellations never stretcht out of their compasses, though the Stars of which they are compounded, have their peculiar motions.

To understand this, we must know that the Stars of the Firmament have their peculiar motions from West to East, upon the Pole of the Eccliptick, and that they go that way a matter of one Degree, in the space of about 100 years, and consequently the Stars do retrograde every year in the Eccliptick from West to East 52 Seconds. Ptolomeus holdeth this opinion, but other renowned Astrologers give them more: For my part I am of Tychobrahe’s opinion, who allowed them one Degree of retrogradation in 70 years and 7 Months, and consequently 51 Seconds every year.

According to this Doctrine the Star that is in the Horn of Aries, was observed by Tymocharis in 2d Degree; 150 years after, Hipparchus observed it in the first; 265 years after, Ptolomeus saw it in the 6 Degree; 740 years after, Albathognius observed it in the 18 Degree; 304 years after, Alphonsus King of Spain, found it in the 6 Degree; 265 years after, Copernicus did observe it to be in the 27 Degree and two Minutes; 61 years after, Tychobrahe saw it in the 27 Degree, and above 37 Minutes; so that in the space of 61 years it had gone 35 Minutes.

By this Doctrine we see that the whole constellations do not go beyond their Poles, though the Stars that Compound them change their Poles every year of 51 Seconds.

To double, then here cannot be taken in the first sense, nor in the third sense, for the first reason, it must then be in the second sense; and thus Aries doubleth his Bastarnan Pole; that is, Aries maketh twice his Pole, which answereth to Bastarnia.

If you ask how it cometh to pass that Aries doubleth this Pole, and in what place of Heaven we set this Bastarnan Pole. I answer to the first, that Aries doubleth his Pole, when one of those 13 Stars cometh to that point, which is a Northern or Western Pole to that sign in the Eccliptick. As to the second: I answer, that the place ought to be its last Degree, viz. the end of the 30 Degree.

Why? (will you say) did the Author mark that difference of the Sign of Aries, rather than that of Taurus, or of another?

I answer, that it was in favour of France; because Aries doth govern in France, and if it hath been favourable to it, when it came first to the Bastarnan Pole, it will be so too when it doubleth the same Pole, seeing that it will have the same position and Aspect. Now we see, that in the space of these 100 years, France was not overcome, much less shall it be hereafter, seeing that the Stars do promise its exaltation for a long continuance.

If I were a great Astrologer, I should observe exactly by this, that within the space of 290 years, Aries shall double his Cape Bastarnan, and consequently Aries should come to that Pole just in the year 1845. which is according to that we have said.

[130]

LVIII.

French.

Aupres du Rhin des Montagnes Noriques,
Naistra un grand de gens trop tard venu,
Qui defendra Sarmates & Pannoniques,
Qu’on ne scaura quil sera devenu.

English.

Near the Rhine, out of the Norick Mountains,
Shall be born a great one, though too late come,
Who shall defend the Polonians and Hungarians,
So that it shall not be known what is become of him.

ANNOT.

This is plain.

LIX.

French.

Barbare Empire par le tiers usurpé,
La plus grand part de son sang mettre amort,
Par mort senicle par luy quart frappé,
Pour peur que sang par le sang ne soit mort.

English.

A Barbarian Empire shall be usurped by a third person,
Who shall put to death the greatest part of his Kindred,
By death of old age, the fourth shall be stricken by him,
For fear that blood should not die by blood.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain, I acknowledge my Ignorance in the last two.

LX.

French.

Par toute Asia grande proscription,
Mesme en Mysie, Lydie, & Pamphilie,
Sang versera par dissolution,
D’un jeune noir remply de felonie.

English.

Through all Asia shall be a great proscription,
Yea in Mysia, Lydia, and Pamphilia,
Blood shall be spilled by the debauchness
Of a young black man, full of felony.

ANNOT.

Mysia, Lydia, and Pamphilia, are Countreys of Asia.

[131]

LXI.

French.

La grande bande & secte Crucigere,
Se dressera en Mesopotamie,
Du proche Fleuve compagnie legere,
Qui telle Loy tiendra pour ennemie.

English.

The great troop and sect wearing a Cross,
Shall rise up in Mesopotamia,
Near the next River shall be a light company,
Which shall hold that law for enemy.

ANNOT.

It is an Army of Christians (be like Armenians) that shall rise in Mesopotamia against whom shall an Army of Turkish Horseman come, who did live by the next River.

LXII.

French.

Proche del Duero par Mer Cyrene close,
Viendra percer les grands Monts Pyrenees,
La main plus courte & sa percée gloses
A Carcasonne conduira ses menées.

English.

Near the Duero closed by the Cyrenian Sea,
Shall come to pierce the great Pyrenean Mountains,
The shorter hand and his pierced glose,
Shall in Carcassone lead his plot.

ANNOT.

The Cyrenian Sea, is that Sea which is by the Province of Cyrene. The Pyrenean Mountains part Spain from France. Carcassonne is a Town in France near unto Spain. The rest passeth my understanding.

LXIII.

French.

Romain pouvoir sera du tout a bas,
Son grand Voisin imiter les vestiges,
Occultes haines civiles, & debats,
Retarderont aux boufons leur folies.

English.

The Roman power shall be quite put down,
His great Neighbour shall follow his steps,
Secret and civil hatreds and quarrels,
Shall stop the Buffons folly.

[132]

ANNOT.

The first Verse signifieth, that the Pope’s Authority shall be put down.

The second, that his great neighbour, that is the Empire shall follow his steps, that is, be put down too. The two last Verses are plain.

LXIV.

French.

Le Chef de Perse remplira grand Olchade,
Classe trireme contre gent Mahometique,
De Parthe & Mede & piller les Cyclades,
Repos long temps au grand Port Jonique.

English.

The Head of Persia shall fill a great Olchade,
A Fleet of Galleys against the Mahometan Nation,
From Parthia and Media they shall come to plunder the Cyclades,
A long rest shall be on the Jonique Port.

ANNOT.

I could not find what he meaneth by Olchade. The second Verse is plain.

Parthia and Media are two Kingdoms depending from that of Persia. The Islands of Cyclades are in the Ægean Sea, and are so called because they are like a Garment about the City of Delos, for κυκλας in Greek signifieth a round garment of a woman.

The Jonique Sea is that Sea in Grecia, which is about Athens and Corinth, &c.

LXV.

French.

Quand le Sepulchre du grand Romain trouvé,
Le jour apres sera esleu Pontife,
Du Senat gueres il ne sera prouvé,
Empoisonné, son sang au Sacre Scyphe.

English.

When the Sepulcher of the great Roman shall be found,
The next day after a Pope shall be elected,
Who shall not be much approved by the Senate,
Poisoned, his blood in the Sacred Scyphe.

ANNOT.

This seemeth to foretel the finding out of the Sepulcher of some famous Roman, and that the next day after a Pope shall be Elected, who being not well approved of by the Conclave, shall be poisoned in the Chalice, which is the Communion Cup that the Roman Catholicks use at Mass, signified here by the Latine word Scyphus.

LXVI.

French.

Le grand Baillif d’Orleans mis a mort.
Sera par un de sang vindicatif,
De mort merite ne mourra, ne par sort,
Des pieds & mains mal, le faisoit captif.
[133]

English.

The great Bailif of Orleans shall be put to death,
By one of a revengeful blood,
He shall not die of a deserved death, nor by chance,
But the disease of being tied hand and foot, hath made him prisoner.

ANNOT.

The Bailif of Orleans is a great Officer, for he is there Lord Chief Justice, and of all the precincts. It seemeth that this man shall be put to death, by one of a revengeful blood, not that he had deserved it, or come to it by chance, but because he shall be tied hand and foot, and die in prison.

LXVII.

French.

Une nouvelle Secte de Philosophes,
Mesprisant mort, or, honneurs & richesses,
Des Monts Germains seront fort limitrophes,
A les ensuivre auront appuy & presses.

English.

A new Sect of Philosophers shall rise,
Despising Death, Gold, Honours and Riches,
They shall be near the Mountains of Germany,
They shall have abundance of others to support and follow them.

ANNOT.

This is properly said of the Anabaptists in Germany, in the time of John de Leyden, and now of the Quakers in England, and elsewhere.

LXVIII.

French.

Peuple sans Chef d’Espagne & d’Italie,
Morts, profligez dedans le Cheronese,
Leur dict trahy par legere folie,
Le sang nager per tout a la traverse.

English.

A people of Spain and Italy without a Head,
Shall die, being overcome in the Cheronese,
Their saying shall be betrayed by a light folly,
The blood shall swim all over at random.

ANNOT.

Cheronese is a Land or ground unmanured; the rest is plain.

[134]

LXIX.

French.

Grand exercite conduit par jouvenceau,
Se viendra rendre aux mains des ennemis,
Mais le vieillard nay au demy pourceau,
Fera Chalon & Mascon estre amis.

English.

A great Army led by a young man,
Shall yield it self in the hands of the enemies,
But the old man born at the sign of the halfe-Hog,
Shall cause Chalon and Mascon to be friends.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain; as for the third Verse, I could not find who that Old man should be, that shall be born at the sign of the half-Hog.

Chalon and Mascon are two Cities in France, the first in Champagne, the last in Burgundy.

LXX.

French.

La grand Bretagne comprise d’Angleterre,
Viendra par eaux si haut a inondre,
La Ligue nevue d’Ausone fera gerre,
Que contre eux ils se viendront bander.

English.

Great Britany comprehended in England,
Shall suffer so great an Inundation by Waters,
The new League of Ausone shall make Wars,
So that they shall stand against them.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is divided in two parts. The first two Verses foretel a great Innundation, that was to happen in England.

The last two speak of a league and insurrection, that shall be at Bordeaux, which is here called Ausone, from a famous Latine Poet, named Ausonius, who was born in that City.

As to the first part, after much seeking and enquiry: I found the truth of it in a Latine book, called Rerum in Gallia, Belgia, Hispania, Anglia, &c. gestarum anno 1607. Tomi septimi Liber secundus conscriptus a Nicolao Gotardo Artus Dantiscano, where the History is related thus.

About the end of January 1607 the Sea broke out so violently in England, that after the breaking of Fences and Dikes, it caused very great damages to the Inhabitants. The greatest mischief was done in Somersetshire, where the water did overflow, ten Leagues in length, and two in breadth, twelve foot high in the most eminent places. This sudden Innundation brought a fearful alarm to the Countrey people; some of them going to their Plough, were fained to run back to their houses, where they found their enemies at their doors, viz. Death and Water, who without distinction swept them away. In a little time, the Towns appeared like Islands, encompassed[135] on all sides, and presently after were swallowed up, so that the tops of the Trees were scarce seen. This new Flood covered so the Towns of Hansfield, in the same County, those of Grantham, Kenhus, Kingston, and Briandon, with several Farms built in the Champion Countrey, that none of the Buildings could be seen. If you add to this the devastation of the places, the quantity of Corn, Fruit, and Grass that was lost, the misery shall be so great, as not to be expressed. During this fearful quarrel between the Water and the Land, an exceeding great number of people died of all Ages, and Sexes, it would avail them nothing to get into the upper Stories and Roofs of houses, nor upon the highest Trees; for the imperious Waters did so swell and rage, that the Foundations of the houses, and roots of the Trees were loosened, so that both fell to the Ground, or rather into the Water. The people seeing no way to escape, resolved to die patiently. No body could without great grief see the Oxen and Sheep drowning; for there was such a numerous quantity of them, that afar off one would have thought them to be Rocks in the Sea, but seeing them swiming, and hearing them bleating and bellowing, one would have thought them to be a storm and hissing of winds. A rich Farmer, and father of seven Children, being involved in the Flood, and much astonished at this accident, nevertheless thinking the danger less then it was, went about to save some of his best Goods; but seeing the Waters to increase, he forsook all, and went to save one of his Children, whom he loved best; but the Waters followed him so close, that all he could do, was to get upon the Roof of his house. Among the Children there was a little one sleeping in a Cradle, which being made of close boards, did swim upon the Waters about three Miles, and was taken up alive, and sound. The Hay-cocks did swim like Ships upon the Waves, the Pigeons and Pigs were upon the Sheaves that the Water carried away. The Coneys being driven out of their holes, had leapt upon the backs of the swiming Sheep. A certain Shepheard being about to gather his Sheep into their Fold, was followed by the Flood, ran for his life, and climbed upon a high Tree, where seeing his Sheep bleating in the water, he began to tear his hair, to smite his breast, to lift up his hands and his eyes to Heaven, and when his Sheep had all perished, and himself endured an extream cold and hunger, he was at last taken up in a Boat that was sent to save the distressed.

But here we must talk of Bristol, which is one of the chiefest Cities in England, by reason of the Haven, which bringeth thither abundance of Merchants, from several Nations. The same day of that Inundation, the Sea breaking into a great Channel, did presently overflow the Countrey with such quickness and violence, that it covered the Valleys, and the smaller Hills, in so much that nothing but an utter ruine was expected; many whole houses were turned upside down, and carried away with the Flood. The Barns full of Corn, Hay, and Straw, were overthrown, and the Cattle carried away, besides abundance of people of all sorts. The Merchants of London and Bristol, and the rest of the Inhabitants, besides the loss of Provisions, suffered an inestimable one in their Commodities, which they had provided for the Fair, that was then near hand, the most part of them being carryed away by the Flood, and the rest so spoiled, that the owners could not tell what to do with them. A Gentleman dwelling between Barnstable and Bristol, and two Leagues off from the Sea, being gone abroad in the Morning to oversee his grounds, did look towards the Sea, ran back again to his house, to bring this sad news to his Wife and Servants, while they were endeavouring to pack up the most precious of their Goods, the Water came about the house so fast, that they altered their resolution, and bethought themselves only to save their lives; the servants busied themselves about tying the Goods together, thinking the Water could not have carryed them away. As for the Gentleman, he went with his Wife and Children to the top of the house, and got upon the rafters of the Roof. Although nothing appeared to them but[136] the Image of death; nevertheless some hope and desire of escaping, made the Gentleman come down to save a little Trunk, wherein his papers of greatest concernment were. Being come down from the Rafter, he laid hold of the Trunk, and fastened it to a Manger; while he was busie about it, the Waves of the Sea did so beat against that house, that it fell down to the Ground. The Wife, Children, and Servants were swallowed up in the ruine. The Gentleman laid hold on a Rafter, and was carryed away with it above half a League further, to a Mountain, where he set his foot upon dry Ground, being half dead with fear and grief, and bewailing the loss of his Wife, Children, and Servants, he spyed the little Trunk and the Manger, which he drew to Land, and that was all he saved, besides his Life.

Another Gentleman living thereabouts, and newly married, was resolved that day to go to the next Town, and make merry with some friends, whereupon he bid his man make his Horse ready, and himself went to put on his Boots; after he had put on one, and whilst he held the other in his hand, the Waters came so fiercely into that house, that they compelled the half Booted Gentleman to run away for his life, in an upper Chamber, but he was followed so close by that merciless Element, that he was fained to get upon the top of the Roof, to save his life, and to ride upon the upper Rafter, but the house and Roof melting by the violence of the Waves, this new Knight was carryed by the violence of them towards the Town where he intended to make merry, and there was saved with much adoe.

It happened at the same time near Markand, in the Dutchy of Norfolk, that two Thieves, going about to steal some Cattle, while they were driving of them, perceived in the Morning the Justice of God following them; it was the Water, which having overtopped the Dikes, threatned the takers of being taken, and compelled them to save themselves with all speed. From their wickedness did arise a great good; for to the next Town they went, and bid the Sexton to Ring the Bell, and to cry Water, Water: The Inhabitants being for the most part asleep, did not know what to do in such an Alarm: Some climbed into the Church’s Steeple; others thinking there were Thieves went about to fence and defend their houses; others hearing of a Flood, laughed at it, and said, that those who brought this News, deserved to be punished; but presently they altered their Languages, and their laughing was turned into a fearful mourning, every one flying to save himself, his Wife, and Children, and whatsoever they could pack up of their most precious Goods. Some thinking to have more wit than others, went about to divert the Current of the Water from their houses; but seeing there was no remedy, they went with their Wives and Children to the tops of their houses, in a lamentable fright.

But when the Water came to seize upon the houses, wherein there were some Playing, some Drinking, others already Drunken, a great part of them were drowned, others ran to a Hill near the Town, where they spent the rest of that night, and the day following with great lamentations.

The next day they saw their houses half under Water, and many people, who from the windows and Steeples cryed for help; others endeavoured to save themselves upon Boards and Rafters; the Horses tyed to the Manger were all suffocated. The Cattle in the fields, were by this time driven to the Mount called Truhill, and for all that, were not out of danger; for the Mountain was encompassed with Water to such a heighth and depth, that without Boats there was no access to it; chiefly because of the Thickets and Bushes. Thus so much Cattle was about to perish, had not some Shepherds brought Boats loaded with provisions for Men and Beasts, till the Waters retired again, and the Dikes were made good.

[137]

LXXI.

French.

Ceux dans les Isles de long temps assiegez,
Prendront vigueur force contre ennemis,
Ceux par dehors morts de faim profligez,
En plus grand faim que jamais seront mis.

English.

Those in the Islands that have been long besieged,
Shall take vigour and force against their enemies,
Those without shall die for hunger; being overcome,
They shall be put in greater famine then they were before.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy came to pass when the Spaniards Besieged Leyden in Holland, for the Dutch broke the Dikes, whereby the water came upon them so fast, that they were more besieged and starved then those of the Town, and their Army wholly destroyed. Read Cardinal Bentivoglios his History of the Low-Countreys, as also Strada.

LXXII.

French.

Le bon Vieillard tout vis Ensevely,
Prez du grand Fleuve par faux soupcon,
Le nouveaux vieux de richesse ennobly,
Prins en chemin tout l’or de la Rancon.

English.

The good old man shall be buried alive,
Near the great River by a false suspicion,
The new old one made noble by his riches,
The gold of his ransom shall be taken in the way.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is divided into two parts: the two first Verses are concerning an old man that shall be buried alive near a great River, upon a false suspition.

The latter two are concerning a young man, who shall assume unto himself the name of a noble Family, and so make himself noble by his riches, but being afterward taken prisoner, the money that was sent for his Ransom, shall be taken in the way.

LXXIII.

French.

Quand dans le Regne parviendra le boiteux,
Competiteur aura proche Bastard,
Luy & le Regne viendront si fort rogneux,
Qu’ains quil guerisse son fait sera bien tard.
[138]

English.

When the lame man shall attain to the Kingdom,
He shall have a Bastard for his near competitor,
He, and his Kingdom shall be so scabby,
That before he be cured it will be late.

ANNOT.

The words and the sense are plain.

LXXIV.

French.

Naples, Florence, Fayence & Imole,
Seront en termes de telle fascherie,
Que pour complaire au malheureux de Nole,
Plaint d’avoir fait a son Chef moquerie.

English.

Naples, Florence, Fayenza, and Imola,
Shall be put into so much distress,
For being complaisant to the unhappy one of Nola,
Who was complained of for having mocked his Superiour.

ANNOT.

Naples, Florence, Fayenza, Imola and Nola are all Cities in Italy; the rest is plain.

LXXV.

French.

Pau, Verone, Vicence, Saragousse,
De Glaive atteints, Terroirs de sang humides,
Peste si grande viendra a la grand gousse,
Proche secours & bien long les remedes.

English.

Pau, Verona, Vicenza, Saragossa,
Shall be hit by the Sword, the Countrey shall be moist with blood,
So great a plague and so vehement shall come,
That though the succours be near, the remedy shall be far off.

ANNOT.

By Pau here are understood the Towns that are seated upon that River.

Verona, Vicenza, are two Cities in Italy, belonging to the Venetians. Saragossa is a City in Sicily.

LXXVI.

French.

En Germanie naistront diverses Sectes,
Saprochant sort de l’heureux Paganisme,
Le cœur captif & petites receptes,
Feront retour a payer le vray disme.
[139]

English.

In Germany shall divers Sects arise,
Coming very near the happy Paganism,
The heart captivated and small receivings,
Shall open the gate to pay the true Tithes.

ANNOT.

The first and second Verses have been verified sufficiently.

By the two last Verses, he meaneth that the heart of everyone shall be in fear, so that they shall come to an agreement, which the true Tithes shall be paid, and every one come to his own again.

LXXVII.

French.

Le tiers climat soubs Aries comprins,
L’An mil sept cens vingt sept en Octobre,
Le Roy de Perse par ceux d’Ægypte prins,
Conflict, mort, perte, a la Croix grand opprobre.

English.

The third Climat comprehended under Aries,
In the year 1700. the twenty seven of October,
The King of Persia shall be taken by those of Ægypt,
Battle, death, loss, a great shame to the Christians.

ANNOT.

Here be three notable things to be observed: one is the plain and punctual specification of the time, in which the Prophecy shall come to pass, viz. the 7. of October in the year 1700. The second is, that the King of Persia shall be taken by those of Ægypt. The third is, the shame and confusion that the Christians shall suffer for the same.

LXXVIII.

French.

Le Chef d’Escosse avec six d’Allemagne,
Par gents de mer Orientaux captif,
Traverseront le Calpre & Espagne,
Present en Perse au nouveau Roy craintif.

English.

The Chief of Scotland with six of Germany,
Shall be taken prisoners by Seamen of the East,
They shall go through the Calpre and Spain,
And shall be made a present in Persia to the new fearful King.

ANNOT.

By the Calpre is understood the Capzor promontory, which is at the mouth of the Streights, by and beyond which these Prisoners will be carried into Persia for a present to the King, who then shall be some fearful person.

[140]

LXXIX.

French.

Le grand criard sans honte audacieux,
Sera esleu Governeur le d’Armée,
La hardiesse de son contentieux,
Le pont rompu, Cité de peur pasmée.

English.

The great bawler proud without shame,
Shall be elected Governour of the Army,
The stoutness of his Competitor,
The Bridge being broken, the City shall faint for fear.

ANNOT.

Paradin saith, that in the year 1558. the Lord of Bonnivet being dead, the King of France did chuse Francis of Vendosme, Vidame of Amiens, to succeed the said Bonnivet, in the Office of Colonel of the French Foot. This Vidame is noted by all Historians, for a rash proud man, that had a good opinion of himself, and found fault with all the commands of the Marshal of Brissac, then General of the Army.

The King in consideration of his Birth, and that he was a good Souldier, gave him the place of the Lord Bonnivet, according to what the Author saith, The great Bawler, &c. shall be elected Governour in the Army. If you ask in what Army he was elected Governour, the third Verse answereth, in the Army of his Competitor, that is, the Marshal of Brissac, who did chide him severely for disobeying his commands, and was like once to have killed him.

The fourth Verse proved true at the taking of Queiras, where the Bridge, through which the succours came to relieve the Town, being broken, the Town grew so fearful, that it surrendred it self to the Marshal of Brissac.

LXXX.

French.

Erins, Antibe, villes auteur de Nice,
Seront vastées fort par Mer & par Terre,
Les Sauterelles Terre & Mer vent propice,
Prins, morts, troussez, pillez, sans loy de guerre.

English.

Erins, Antibe, and the Towns about Nices,
Shall be destroyed by Sea and Land,
The Grashopers shall have the Land, the Sea, and Wind favourable,
They shall be taken, killed, thrust up, plundered, without Law of War.

ANNOT.

Erins and Antibe are Towns of Provence, bordering upon Nice, which is a Town of Piemont, all that Coast is threatned here to be ruined by the Grashopers, that is, the Turks, which fell out about the year 1558. for the King of France having called the Turks to his succours against Charles V. Emperour, they came and took Nice in the behalf of the French, where they committed unheard cruelties, as also upon all that Coast.

[141]

LXXXI.

French.

L’Ordre fatal sempiternal par chaisne,
Viendra tourner par ordre consequent,
Du Port Phocen sera rompue la chaine,
La Cité prinse, l’ennemy quant & quant.

English.

The fatal and eternal order by chain,
Shall come to turn by consequent order,
Of Port Phocen the chain shall be broken,
The City taken, and the enemy presently after

ANNOT.

This Prophecy regardeth onely the City of Marseilles, which is the most famous Port Town that the French have upon the Mediterranean Sea, and which was anciently a Greek Colony, peopled by the Phocen Seas. This City is threatned here to have the chain of her Port broken, and to be taken by her enemies, and the said enemies to be a little while after taken in it.

LXXXII.

French.

Du Regne Anglois le digne dechassé,
Le Conseiller par ire mis a feu,
Ses adherans iront si bas tracer,
Que le bastard sera demy receu.

English.

From the English Kingdom the worthy driven away,
The Councellor through anger shall be burnt,
His partners shall creep so low,
That the bastard shall be half received.

ANNOT.

This is one of those Prophecies that concern the English Nation, and which by its event, hath made this Book and the Author thereof famous, for nothing can be more plain to the meanest capacity, then the sense and words of these four Verses.

By the first, is meant the Kings most excellent Majesty Charles II. now Reigning, who being the true Heir to the Kingdom, and most worthy to rule, was driven out of the Kingdom by a rebellious rout of his Subjects.

The second Verse expresseth, the punishment inflicted upon the Councellors and Abettors of so hainous a crime, who were most of them hanged, drawn and quartered, their entrals burnt.

The third Verse, signifieth the low estate of the Abettors of that pernicious Councel.

The fourth Verse, is understood that bastard Faction, which was like to supplant Cromwel, upon the division of the Army.

[142]

LXXXIII.

French.

Les longs cheveux de la Gaule Celtique,
Accompagnez d’Estranges Nations,
Mettront captif l’Agent Aquitanique,
Pour succomber a leurs intentions.

English.

The long hairs of the Celtian France,
Joyned with forrain Nations,
Shall put in prison the Aquitanick Agent,
To make him yield to their intentions.

ANNOT.

The Celtan France is that part of France included between the River Loire, and that of Scheld in Flanders. they are called here the long hairs; because in antient time they used to wear long hairs.

LXXXIV.

French.

La grand Cite sera bien desolée,
Des habitans un seul n’y demoura,
Mur, Sexe, Temple, & Vierge violée,
Par Fer, Feu, Peste, Canon, peuple mourra.

English.

The great City shall be made very desolate.
Not one of the Inhabitants shall be left in it,
Wall, Sex, Church, and Virgin ravished,
By Sword, Fire, Plague, Canon, people shall die.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the Town of St. Quentin, which was taken by the Spaniards in the year 1557. upon the 27 of August, and 17 days after the Battle of St. Laurence, it was taken by assault, and all the Inhabitants put to the Sword.

LXXXV.

French.

La Cité prinse par tromperie fraude,
Par le moyen d’Un bean jeune attrapé,
Assaut donné, Raubine pres de Laude,
Luy & touts morts pour avoir bien trompé.

English.

The City shall be taken by cheat and deceit,
By the means of a fair young one caught in it,
Assault shall be given, Raubine near Laude,
He, and all shall die, for having deceived.

[143]

ANNOT.

It is a City that shall be taken by the cheat and deceit of a young fair man, who himself shall be taken in his craft.

The difficulty lyeth in the third Verse, viz. what he meaneth by Raubine and Laude. I could find nothing by transposition of Letters: therefore I suppose the Author had a mind to reserve the exposition to himself, and to one that should be clearer sighted than I.

LXXXVI.

French.

Un chef d’Ausonne aux Espagnes ira,
Par Mer, sera arrest dedans Marseilles,
Avant sa mort un long temps languira,
Apres sa mort on verra grand merveille.

English.

A chief man of Ausone shall go into Spain
By Sea, he shall stay at Marseilles,
He shall languish a great while before his death,
After his death great wonders shall be seen.

ANNOT.

Here is nothing obscure but the word Ausone, by which is meant the City of Bordeaux, so named by the Author every where, for having brought forth that famous Latine Poet, and Counsul of Rome, Ausonius.

LXXXVII.

French.

Classe Gauloise naproche de Corsegne,
Moins de Sardaigne tu ten repentiras,
Tretous mourrez frustrez de laide Greigne,
Sang nagera, captif ne me croiras.

English.

French Fleet do not come near unto Corsica,
Much less to Sardinia, thou shalt repent of it,
All of you shall die frustrate of the help Greigne,
Blood shall swim, being Captive thou shalt not believe me.

ANNOT.

The Baron of la Garde coming from Rome, where he had carryed the Cardinals of Tournon and Lorrain, received order to go into Corsica, to relieve with ammunition the two Towns, that the French kept still in possession in that Island, Glasse and St. Boniface, which after the general peace made at Cambray, anno 1559. were restored to the Common-wealth of Genoa. When he was coming near the Island, there arose such a storm, that they were constrained to go as near land as they could, viz. in St. Florents, till the storm was over.

At the same time, by reason of the said storm, eleven Ships loaded with six thousand Spaniards, going for Italy, took shelter in the same place, a good way off from the said Baron.

[144]

At the first, the Spanish Ships did not spie the French Galleys, but the Baron de la Garde discovered the Spaniards, and bid his Galleys to set upon them. Two of the Spanish Ships were taken, in which were 1200. or 1500. Spaniards, part of which were drowned, and the rest made slaves.

The Baron chased the rest, but the storm so scattered them, that the nine escaped.

Before this encounter the Genoese Captain, Andrew d’Oria, took all the Island from the French, Anno 1553. and kept it ever since, by sending continual supplies. On the other side, the King of France sent supplies by the Lord of Termes, to those that were retired in the Island of Glasse.

One time among the rest, about the latter end of the year 1555. there was sent a notable supplie from the French, to which the Author speaketh now in these tearms.

French fleet do not come near unto Corsica, nor Sardinia, which is another Island near Corsica. The third Verse giveth the Reason of it; ye shall die, being frustrated of the help Greigne. Greigne is the Provencal Language, which was the Maternal one of our Author, signifieth a Galley: The sense therefore is this, you shall be frustrate of the help of the Galleys, that are under the command of the Baron de la Garde, who carryed unto you men, money, and ammunition; because he shall be then in pursute of the Spanish fleet, that were scattered by a storm.

In the mean time Blood shall swim in the fight of the Baron de la Garde, and thou, poor Prisoner in that Island, Thou shalt not believe me; those slaves were they, which went in the year 1555. And the Author saying, Thou shalt not believe me, sheweth, that being very famous in Provence, for his Prophecies, the General of the Army had asked him concerning the success of his Journey, and that he did warn him not to undertake it; but having an express command from the King, his Master, he would need go. Therefore he saith, Poor prisoner thou shalt not believe me. We find in this work many examples of those, who went to consult with the Author concerning the success of their undertakings, as did the Earl of Sommerive, before the besieging of Bagnole, to whom he answered, that he should leave the Trees loaded with a new kind of fruit, that is to say, of the Rebels, whom he caused to be hanged on Trees.

LXXXVIII.

French.

De Barcelone par Mer si grande Armée,
Toute Marseille de frayeur tremblera,
Isles saisies, de Mer aide fermeé,
Ton traditeur en Terre nagera.

English.

There shall come from Barcelona by Sea so great a fleet,
That Marseilles shall quake for fear,
The Islands shall be seized, the help by Sea shut up,
Thy Traitor shall swim to Land.

ANNOT.

Barcelona is a Town in Spain, upon the Mediterranean Sea; Marseilles is another in France, upon the same Sea. The rest is easie.

[145]

LXXXIX.

French.

En ce temps la sera frustrée Cypre,
De son secours, de ceux de Mer Ægée,
Vieux trucidez mais par Mesles & Lipre,
Seduit leur Roy, Roine plus outragée.

English.

At that time Cyprus shall be frustrated
Of its succours, of those of the Ægean Sea,
Old ones shall be killed, but by Mesles and Lipre,
Their King shall be seducted, and the Queen more wronged.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain, the two last have need of an Oedipus.

XC.

French.

Le grand Satyre & Tygre d’Hircanie,
Don presenté a ceux de l’Occean,
Un chef de Classe istra de Carmanie,
Qui prendra Terre au Thyrren Phocean.

English.

The great Satyr and Tyger of Hircania,
Shall be a gift presented to those of the Ocean,
An Admiral of a fleet shall come out of Carmania,
Who shall Land in the Thyrren Phocean.

ANNOT.

By the great Satyr and Tyger of Hircania, is meant, the King of Persia, who is also King of Hircania, abounding with Tygers.

That King of Persia shall be made a gift to those of the Ocean; that is, shall be either drowned in it, or do some wonderful things upon it.

Carmania is a Province in Asia, belonging to the Turk.

The Thyrren Phocean is the City of Marseilles in France, so called by the Author in this Book; because it was a Colony of the Phocenses in Greece; it is also called Thyrren, because it is seated upon the Tyrrhenean Sea, as Virgil saith,

————Thyrrenum navigat Æquor.

[146]

XCI.

French.

L’Arbre qu’estoit par long temps mort seiché,
Dans une nuit viendra a reverdir,
Son Roy malade, Prince pied attaché,
Craint d’ennemis fera Voiles bondir.

English.

The Tree that had been long dead and withered,
In one night shall grow green again,
His King shall be sick, his Prince shall have his foot tied,
Being feared by his enemies, he shall make his Sails to rebound.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are Metaphorical, and are to be understood of a considerable person, who having been for a long time despised and under a cloud, shall on a sudden rise again and be in repute. The two last Verses are intelligible enough.

XCII.

French.

Le monde proche du dernier periode,
Saturn encor sera tard de retour,
Translat Empire devers Nations brode,
L’œil arraché a Narbon par Autour.

English.

The world being near its last period,
Saturn shall come yet late to his return,
The Empire shall be translated into brode Nations,
Narbon shall have her eye pickt out by a Hawk.

ANNOT.

The meaning of the first and second Verses is, that the world shall be at an end, before Saturn hath performed his whole course, which (if I do not mistake) is thought by the Astronomers to be of 36000. years.

The third Verse signifieth, that before the end of the world, the Empire shall be translated or possessed by a black Nation, for brode in old French signifieth black, whence it cometh that to this day they call a handsom black woman, une belle Brode, that is a fair black woman.

Narbon is a famous City in Languedoc, and the seat of an Archbishop.

[147]

XCIII.

French.

Dans Avignon tout le Chef de l’Empire,
Fera arrest, pour Paris desole,
Tricast tiendra l’Annibalique ire,
Lion par change sera mal consolé.

English.

In Avignon all the Chief of the Empire,
Shall stay, by reason of Paris being desolate,
Tricast shall stop the Annibalik anger,
Lion by change shall be ill comforted.

ANNOT.

The first and second Verse signifie, that the Pope once more shall keep his seat in Avignon, which is a Town in France belonging to the Pope, and where formerly they kept their See, for the space of above an hundred years. As for the word Tricast, there must be a foul errour in the impression or else; I must confess I understand it not. By the Annibilik anger, is meant those of Barbary, where Annibal was born. Lion is a famous Town in France, where is kept the greatest trading for Bills of Exchange.

XCIV.

French.

De cinq cens ans plus compte l’on tiendra,
Celuy qu’estoit l’ornement de son temps,
Puis a un coup grande clarté donra,
Que pour ce Siecle les rendra tres-contens.

English.

For five hundred years no account shall be made,
Of him who was the ornament of his time:
Then on a sudden he shall give so great a light,
That for that age he shall make them to be most contented.

ANNOT.

The words and the sense are plain.

XCV.

French.

Lu Loy Morique on verra defaillir,
Apres un autre beaucoup plus seductive,
Boristhenes premier viendra faillir,
Par dons & langue une plus attractive.
[148]

English.

We shall see the Morish Law to decline,
After which, another more seducing shall arise,
Boristhenes shall be the first that shall fall,
By gifts and tongue that Law shall be most seducing.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth the declining of the Mahometan Religion, after which another Religion shall be set up worse then the Mahometan. The first decay of it shall begin in Scythia, a Kingdom belonging to the King of Persia, through which runneth the River Boristhenes.

XCVI.

French.

Chef de Fossan aura gorge coupée,
Par le Ducteur du Limier & L’curier,
Le fait patré par ceux du Mont Tarpée,
Saturne en Leo 13. de February.

English.

The Chief of Fossan shall have his throat cut,
By the Leader of the Hunt and Greyhond,
The fact committed by those of the Tarpeian Mountain,
Saturn being in Leo the 13. of February.

ANNOT.

Fossan is a City in Piemont, belonging to the Duke of Savoy, the Chief man or Governour of which is threatned here to have his throat cut by some Souldiers, either of Rome, or belonging to Rome, signified here by the Tarpeian Mountain, upon which the Capitol was built, and this fact to be committed by one that shall be a famous Huntsman; upon the 13 of February, Saturn being then in the Sign of Leo.

XCVII.

French.

Nouvelle Loy, Terre neuve occuper,
Vers la Syrie, Judée & Palestine,
Le grand Empire, Barbare corruer,
Avant que Phebe son Siecle determine.

English.

A new Law shall occupy a new Countrey,
Towards Syria, Judea and Palestina,
The great Barbarian Empire shall fall down,
Before Phœbe maketh an end of her course.

ANNOT.

The words and sense are plain.

[149]

XCVIII.

French.

Deux Royal Freres si fort guerroieront,
Qu’entreux sera la guerre si mortelle,
Qu’un chacun places fortes occuperont,
De Regne & vie sera leur grand querelle.

English.

Two Royal Brothers shall War so much one against the other,
That the War between them shall be mortal,
Each of them shall seize upon strong places,
Their quarrel shall be concerning Kingdom and Life.

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

XCIX.

French.

Aux Champs Herbus d’Alein & du Varneigre,
Du Mont Lebron proche de la Durance,
Camps des deux parts conflict sera si aigre,
Mesopotamie defaillira en France.

English.

In the Meadow Fields of Alein and Varneigre,
Of the Mountain Lebron near the Durance,
Armies on both sides, the fight shall be so sharp,
That Mesopotamia shall be wanting in France.

ANNOT.

Alain and Varnaigre are two small Towns in France, seated by the Mountain Lebron, near the River called Durance, where the Author saith there shall be such a sharp fight, that Mesopotamia shall be wanting in France, to understand this you must know, that Mesopotamia is a Countrey between two Rivers from the Greek words μεσος, which signifieth middle, and ποταμὸς which signifieth a River, the meaning then of the Author is, that the Battle so sharp, the ground shall be wanting to bury the dead.

C.

French.

Entre Gaulois le dernier honoré,
D’homme ennemy sera victorieux,
Force & terreur en moment exploré,
D’Un coup de trait quand mourra l’envieux.
[150]

English.

He that is the least honoured among the French,
Shall be Conqueror of the man that was his Enemy,
Strength and terrour shall in a moment be tried,
When the envious shall be killed with an Arrow.

ANNOT.

This is plain.


[151]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY IV.

I.

French.

Sera du reste de sang non espandu,
Venice quiert secours estre donné,
Apres avoir bien lon temps attendu,
Cité livrée au premier Cor sonné.

English.

There shall be a remnant of blood unspilt,
Venice shall seek for succours,
After having long waited for it,
The City shall be surrendred at the first sound of the Trumpet.

ANNOT.

This to my judgement is concerning the Siege of Candia, in which the Venetians for the space of about twenty years desired and expected succours from the Christian Princes, which came so slowly, that the City was fained to surrender upon honorable terms, which is the meaning of the first Verse, There shall be a remnant of blood unspilt.

[152]

II.

French.

Par mort la France prendra voiage a faire,
Classe par Mer, marcher Monts Pyrenées,
Espagne en trouble marcher gent militaire,
Des plus grands Dames en France emmenées.

English.

By reason of a death, France shall undertake a Journey,
They shall have a Fleet at Sea, and march towards the Pyrenes,
Spain shall be in trouble by an Army,
Some of the greatest Ladies in France carried away

ANNOT.

The whole sense of this is, that by reason of some bodies death, France shall make war against Spain by Sea and Land, and put Spain in great trouble.

The fourth Verse saith, that some of the greatest Ladies in France shall be carried away, but the question is, whether by the Spaniards, or (which is more probable) by their own Husbands going to war against Spain.

III.

French.

D’Arras & Bourges de Brodes grands enseignes,
Un plus grand nombre de Gascons battre a pied,
Ceux long du Rhosne saigneront les Espagnes,
Proche du Mont ou Sagunte sassied.

English.

From Arras and Bourges many colours of black men shall come,
A greater number of Gascons shall go on foot,
Those along the Rhosne shall let Spain blood,
Near the Mountain where Saguntus is seated.

ANNOT.

Arras and Bourges are Cities of France. As for brodes, we have said before that it signifie brown men, such as are the Gascoins, inhabiting the Province of Aquitania near Spain.

Saguntus is a City in Spain, that was destroyed by the Romans.

IV.

French.

L’Important Prince fasché, plaint & querelle,
De rapts & pillé par Coqs & par Libiques,
Grand & par Terre, par Mer infinis Voiles,
Seule Italie sera chassant Celtiques.
[153]

English.

The considerable Prince vexed, complaineth and quarelleth,
Concerning rapes and plunderings done by the Cocks and Libiques
Great trouble by Land, by Sea infinite Sails,
Italy alone shall drive away the French.

ANNOT.

This considerable Prince was Philip the II. King of Spain, who was vexed to see the Cocks, that is the French, and Libiques that is the Turks joyned together, under Barbarossa to commit so many Rapes and violences upon his Subjects.

V.

French.

Croix Paix, soubs un accomply Divin Verbe,
L’Espagne & Gaules seront unis ensemble,
Grand clade proche & combat tresacerbe,
Cœur si hardy ne sera qui ne tremble.

English.

The Cross shall have peace, under an accomplished Divine Word,
Spain and France shall be united together,
A great Battle near hand, and a most sharp fight,
No heart so stout but shall tremble.

ANNOT.

We have said before that by Divine Word, we must not understand the second person of the Trinity, but a Divine or Theologian, called in Greek θεόλογος, which also signifieth Divine Word. Therefore the meaning of the first Verse is, that under the Goverment of some eminent Divine, (be like a good Pope) the Cross shall have peace, that is, the Christian Religion shall be in Peace, and persecution shall cease. The last three Verses are plain.

VI.

French.

D’Habits nouveaux apres faite la treuve,
Malice, trame, & machination,
Premier mourra qui en fera la preuve,
Couleur Venise, insidiation.

English.

After the new Cloaths shall be found out,
There shall be malice, plotting and machination,
He shall die the first that shall make trial of it,
Under colour of Venice, shall be a conspiracy.

ANNOT.

Everybody may be as wise as I in the interpretation of this.

[154]

VII.

French.

Le fils mineur du grand & hay Prince,
De Lepre aura a vingt ans grande tache,
De dueil mourra triste & mince,
Et il mourra la ou tombe chair lache.

English.

The younger Son of the great and hated Prince,
Being twenty years, old shall have a great touch of Leprosie,
His mother shall die for grief, very sad and lean,
And he shall die of the disease loose flesh.

ANNOT.

This is easie to be understood, if we remember that Charles IX. King of France, younger son to Henry II. died of a foul disease, and his Mother Catharine of Medicis died of grief.

VIII.

French.

La grand Cité dassaut prompt repentin
Surpris de nuit, gardes interrompus,
Les Excubies & veilles Saint Quentin,
Trucidez gardes, & les Portails rompus.

English.

The great City shall be taken by a sudden assault,
Being surprised by night, the Watch being beaten,
The Court of Guard and Watch of Saint Quentin
Shall be killed, and the Gates broken.

ANNOT.

This great City was the City of St. Quentin in Picardy, taken by assault by Philip the II. Anno 1557.

IX.

French.

Le Chef du Camp au milieu de la presse,
D’un coup de flesche sera blessé aux cuisses,
Lors que Geneve en larmes & destresse,
Sera trahie par Lozanne & Souisses.

English.

The Chief of the Camp in the middle of the crowd,
Shall be wounded with an Arrow through both his thighs,
When Geneva being in tears and distress,
Shall be betrayed by Lozane and the Switzers.

ANNOT.

The words and sense are plain.

[155]

X.

French.

Le jeune Prince accusé faucement,
Mettra le camp en trouble & en querelles,
Meurtry le chef par le souslevement,
Sceptre appaiser, puis guerir escroüelles.

English.

The young Prince being falsely accused,
Shall put the Camp in trouble, and in quarrele,
The chief shall be murdered by the tumult,
The Scepter shall be appeased, and after cure the Kings-evil.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie must needs be concerning England or France; for there is but those two Kings that challenge the cure of the Kings-evil.

XI.

French.

Celuy quaura couvert de la grand Cappe,
Sera induit a quelque cas patrer,
Les douze rouges viendront soüiller la nappe,
Soubs meurtre, meurtre se viendra perpetrer.

English.

He that shall be covered with a great Cloak,
Shall be induced to commit some great fact,
The twelve red ones shall Soil the Table-cloth,
Under murder, murder shall be committed.

ANNOT.

Every one may interpret this as well as I, provided that by the twelve red ones, he understandeth twelve Cardinals.

XII.

French.

Le Camp plus grand de route mis ensuite,
Gueres plus outre ne sera pourchassé,
Ost recampé & legion reduite,
Puis hors, des Gaules du tout sera chassé.

English.

The greatest Camp being in disorder, shall be routed,
And shall be pursued not much after,
The Army shall incamp again, and the Troops set in order,
Then afterwards, they shall be wholly driven out of France.

[156]

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is concerning an out-landish Army that shall invade France, and though numerous, yet shall be put to flight, and shall not be much pursued: therefore it shall incamp again, and collect and gather again its Troops, and afterwards shall be wholly driven out of France.

I am much mistaken if this Prophecie came not to pass, when the Duke of Parma at the head of a Spanish numerous Army came into France in favour of the League; for Henry IV. met him at the siege of Roven, beat him off, and suffered him to retire quietly, and as the common saying is, made him a Golden Bridge, to retreat into the Low-Countries again.

XIII.

French.

De plus grand perte nouvelles rapportées,
Le rapport fait le camp festonnera,
Bandes unies encontre revoltées,
Double Phalange, grand abandonnera.

English.

News being brought of a great loss,
The report divulged, the Camp shall be astonished,
Troops being united and revolted,
The double Phalange shall forsake the great one.

ANNOT.

This hath a connexion with the precedent; for while the Prince of Parma was busied in France, news was brought to his Camp, that the Hollanders had taken Antwerp, which discouraged his whole Host, and made him retire with all speed.

The Word Phalange signifieth a Battailion or part of an Army, which being expressed here by the word double Phalange, signifieth, that both Horse and Foot deserted the Duke of Parma upon the hearing of this news.

XIV.

French.

La mort subite du premier personage,
Aura changé & mis un autre au Regne,
Tost, tard venu a si haut & basage,
Que Terre & mer faudra que lon le craigne.

English.

The sudden death of the chief man,
Shall cause a change, and put another in the Raign,
Soon, late come to so high a degree, in a low age,
So that by Land and Sea he must be feared.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain.

The two last signifie, that a youth shall come to the Kingdom, soon, that is, by reason of the sudden death of the chief man, and late; because being but young, he shall Reign so long, that he shall be famous, and feared by Sea and Land.

[157]

XV.

French.

D’ou pensera faire venir famine,
De la viendra le rassasiement,
L’œil de la Mer par avare canine,
Pour de l’un lautre donra Huile, Froment.

English.

Whence one thought to make famine to come,
Thence shall come the fulness,
The eye of the Sea through a doggish covetousness,
Shall give to both Oyl and Wheat.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie was fulfilled at the famous Siege of Ostend, which lasted three years and three Months; for the Hollanders that brought relief to the Town, did for covetousness sell the ammunition to the Spaniards that besieged it, for which complaint being made by the States to the Prince of Orenge, Maurice of Nassaw, as also that they did the like to Newport, which he had besieged; he replyed smartly, do you not know that your Countrey men would Sail into Hell, were it not for fear to have their Sails burnt.

XVI.

French.

La Cité franche de liberté fait serue,
Des profligés & resueurs fait azyle,
Le Roy changé a eux non si proterue,
De cent seront devenus plus de Mille.

English.

The free City from a free one shall become slave,
And of the banished and dreamers shall be a retreat,
The King changed in mind, shall not be so froward to them.
Of one hundred they shall become more than a thousand.

ANNOT.

Here you must observe that the Author being a Papist, speaketh this concerning the City of Geneva, which he saith from a free City became a slave, when it shook off the Duke of Savoy’s domination, and became a retreat to the Protestants, whom he called the banished and dreamers.

In the third Verse, by the King changed in his mind that shall not be so froward to them, he meaneth, Henry IV. who having changed the Protestant Religion, to be a Roman Catholick, did undertake their protection against the Duke of Savoy their Prince.

Hence followeth the explication of the fourth Verse, when he saith, that of one hundred they shall become more than a thousand; for in few years the Protestants became so numerous, that they drove the Roman Catholicks wholly out of the Town, and so have remained to this day Masters of it.

[158]

XVII.

French.

Changer a Beaune, Nuis, Chalons, & Dijon,
Le Duc voulant amender la barrée,
Marchant pres Fleuve, Poisson, bec de plongeon,
Verra la queüe: Porte sera serrée.

English.

There shall be a change at Beaune, Nuis, Chalons, Dijon,
The Duke going about to raise Taxes,
The Merchant near the River shall see the tail
Of a Fish, having the Bill of a Cormorant: the door shall be shut.

ANNOT.

Beaune, Chalons, and Dijon, are Cities in France, Nuis is a Town in Germany near the Rhyne, three or four Leagues below Colen.

For the rest, every one may make his own interpretation, for it is hard to guess who this Duke should be, or that Fish either, that shall have a Cormorants Bill after whom the door shall be shut.

XVIII.

French.

Les plus Lettrez dessus les faits Cœlestes,
Seront par Princes ignorans reprouvez,
Punis d’Edict, chassez comme scelestes,
Et mis a mort la ou seront trouvez.

English.

The most Learned in the Celestial sciences,
Shall be found fault with, by ignorant Princes.
Punished by proclamation, chased away as wicked,
And put to death where they shall be found.

ANNOT.

This is plain, and signifieth no more then a persecution against the Professors of Heavenly sciences, such as are Astrologers, Astronomers, &c.

XIX.

French.

Devant Rouan d’Insubres mis le Siege,
Par Terre & Mer enfermez les passages,
D’Hainaut, de Flandres de Gand & ceux de Liege,
Par leurs levées raviront les Rivages.

English.

Before Rouan a Siege shall be laid by the Insubrians.
By Sea and Land the passages shall be shut up,
Those of Hainaut, Flanders, Ghent, and Liege,
With their Troops shall plunder the Sea-shore.

[159]

ANNOT.

This is still concerning the Duke of Parma’s Army, when he came into France against Henry the IV. in favour of the League, for his Army wherewith he Besieged Rouen, was compounded of all those Nations; the greatest part of which were Italians, called here Insubrians, from the Latin word Insubria, which signifieth the Countreys of Savoy and Piemont.

XX.

French.

Paix uberté long temps on ne loüera,
Part tout son Regne desert la fleur de Lis,
Corps mort d’Eau, Terre on apportera,
Sperants vain heur d’estre la ensevelis.

English.

Peace and plenty shall not be long praised,
All the time of his Reign the Flower de Luce shall be deserted,
Bodies shall die by water, Earth shall be brought,
Hoping vainly to be there Buried.

ANNOT.

This only foretelleth a great Famine and Inundation in France, signified here by the Flower de Luce.

XXI.

French.

Le changement sera fort difficile,
Cité Province au change gain fera,
Cœur haut, prudent mis, chassé l’Inhabile,
Mer, Terre, Peuple, son estat changera.

English.

The change shall be very hard,
The City and Countrey shall gain by the change,
A high prudent heart shall be put in, the unworthy expelled,
Sea, Land, People shall change its condition.

ANNOT.

This needeth no Interpretation.

XXII.

French.

La grand Copie qui sera dechassée,
Dans un moment fera besoing au Roy,
La Foy promise de loing sera faucée,
Nud se verra en piteux defarroy.
[160]

English.

The great Army that shall be rejected,
In a moment shall be wanted by the King.
The faith promised a far off shall be broken,
So that he shall be left naked in a pitiful case.

ANNOT.

This is plain.

XXIII.

French.

La Legion dans la Marine classe,
Calcine Magnes, Souphre & Poix bruslera,
Le long repos de l’asseurée place,
Port Selin chercher, feu les consumera.

English.

The Legion in the Maritine Fleet,
Calcineth Magnes, shall burn Brimstone and Pitch,
The long rest of the secure place,
They shall seek Port Selyn, but fire shall consume them.

ANNOT.

Here we must observe four things, the first is, that Calais is called by the Author, The long rest of the secure place. Because then viz. in the year 1555. it was yet in the power of the King of England, and had been quietly before, for the space of 287. years, that is, from the year 1347. till the year 1555. and was so still, till the year 1557. when the Duke of Guise took it, whence we gather that it was a secure place that had enjoyed so long a rest.

The second is, that those of Diepe did watch for the Spaniards, in the passage between Dover and Calais, therefore the Author saith, They shall seek Port Selyn, Selyn Port or Harbour is always taken by the Author for an Harbour in the Ocean.

The third is, that the great fight between the French and the Spaniards was by fire, so that most part of the Ships on each side were burnt, and the Spanish and French Souldiers did cast themselves into the Sea, to save their lives in their enemies Ships, where they were slain.

The fourth is, that those of Diepe being extraordinary skilful in Sea-fights had made great quantity of artificial fires, to cast into the Spanish Ships, but the Ships grapling one with another, they were burnt on both sides.

Upon those four circumstances the two first Verses say, that the Legion in the Fleet Calcineth magnes, that is Loadstone burnt, and shall burn Pitch and Brimstone, to make Artificial fires.

The third and fourth Verse say, that this Sea Legion shall seek an Harbour in the Ocean, which shall be a secure place, by a long rest, that is Calais. She will seek that Selyn Harbour to shelter her self, because Calais did then belong to the English, but by reason of the narrowness of the Sea, the French watched for the Spaniards there, and to shew that they sought onely for Calais to meet the Spaniards, they carried the Spanish Ships which they took into Diepe, and not into Calais.

The French Impression hath a fault here, putting Port Hercle instead of Port Selyn, which is a manifest error, for the taking of Port Hercle by the Florentines the 14. of June 1555. was by a Land Army, besides, that Port Selyn is always taken by the Author for a Port in the Ocean.

[161]

XXIV.

French.

Ouy soubs Terre Sainte Dame voix feinte,
Humaine flamme pour Divine voir luire,
Fera des sœurs de leur sang Terre tainte,
Et les Saints Temples par les impurs destruire.

English.

Under ground shall be heard the fained voice of a Holy Dame,
An humane flame to see a Divine one,
Shall cause the ground to be died with the sisters blood,
And the Holy Temples to be destroyed by the wicked.

ANNOT.

Every one may understand this as well as I.

XXV.

French.

Corps sublimes sans fin a l’œil visibles,
Obnubiler viendront par ces raisons,
Corps, front compris, sens & chef invisibles,
Diminuant les Sacrées Oraisons.

English.

The Celestial bodies that are always visible to the eye,
Shall be darkened for these reasons,
The body with the forehead sense and head invincible.
Diminishing the Sacred Prayers.

ANNOT.

This is of the same nature as the foregoing.

XXVI.

French.

Lou grand Cyssame se levera d’abelhos,
Que non lauran don te siegen venguddos,
Denuech lenbousq, lun gach dessous las treilhos,
Ciutad trahido per cinq lengos non nudos.

English.

The great swarm of Bees shall rise,
And it shall not be known whence they come,
Towards the Ambush so the Jay shall be under a Vine,
A City shall be betray’d by five tongues not naked.

ANNOT.

The Author having made this Stanza in the Provencal Language, that was his Mother Tongue, which hath very little relation to the rest of the French tongue, hath put me to some trouble to understand it; at last I found the meaning to be this, that when a[162] great swarm of Bees shall light on some place, and it shall not be known whence they came, then shall be seen a Jay under a Vine, and a City shall be betrayed by five several Nations.

XXVII.

French.

Salon, Mansol, Tarascon, de Sex, Larc,
Ou est debout encor la Pyramide,
Viendront livrer le Prince Denemark,
Rachat honny au Temple d’Artemide.

English.

Salon, Mansol, Tarascon, Desex, the arche,
Where to this day standeth the Pyramis,
Shall come to deliver the Prince of Denmark,
A shameful ransom shall be paid in the Temple of Artemis.

ANNOT.

Salon, Mansol, Tarascon, Desex, are Towns in Provence and Languedo.

By the Arch, here is meant the Triumphal Arch of Caius Marius, which he erected after the defeat of the Cimbres and Teutons, and remaineth to this day in that Province, within two or three Leagues off the Town of Orenge.

Artemis is an Epethete of Diana, so called ’πο τοῦ ἀερὰ τεμνειν, a secando aerem.

XXVIII.

French.

Lors que Venus du Sol sera couvert,
Soubs la splendeur sera la forme occulte,
Mercure au feu les aura descouvert,
Par bruit Bellique sera mis a l’Insulte.

English.

When Venus shall be covered by the Sun,
Under the splendor of it shall be an occult form,
Mercury in the fire shall discover them,
And by a Warlike rumor shall be provoked.

ANNOT.

If this Book cometh ever into the hands of Hermes’s Disciples, I shall desire they would consider diligently this Stanza, and the three following; for they are all concerning the Elixir of the Philosophers, or the making of the Philosophers stone. To begin with this:

When Venus shall be covered by the Sun.

This is the Astral point, so much sought after by the Philosophers, for the beginning of their work, without the knowledge of which they cannot begin their work, or come to any good.

Under the splendor of it shall be an occult form, that is, under that conjunction lyeth a great mystery.

Mercury in the fire shall discover them, viz. Mercury of the Philosophers, made by Cœlestial fire.

[163]

And by a Warlike rumor shall be provoked; that is, the Planet of Mercury shall be provoked to mix his variable and changable disposition with theirs, by his Aspects, Oppositions, Conjunctions, &c. It is not possible to speak more plainly.

XXIX.

French.

Le Sol caché, eclipsé par Mercure,
Ne sera mis que pour le Ciel second,
De Vulcan Hermes sera faite Pasture,
Sol sera veu pur, rutilant & blond.

English.

The Sun shall be hid and eclipsed by Mercury,
And shall not be set but for the second Heaven,
Hermes shall be made a prey to Vulcan,
And after that the Sun shall be seen pure, shining and yellow.

ANNOT.

Here I must lead the Reader with Ariadnes Thread, that he may extrecate himself out of this Labyrinth.

The Sun shall be hid and Eclipsed by Mercury; that is, Gold shall be Eclipsed and dissolved by the Philosophers Mercury, which is the Key and foundation of all the work.

And shall not be set but for the second Heaven; that is, shall not be used till you come to the second part of the work, which is that of the Furnace.

Hermes shall be made a prey to Vulcan; that is, the matter and composition of the Elixir, shall be put upon the fire in a Furnace.

And after that the Sun shall be seen pure, shining, yellow; that is, in conclusion after projection made, thou shalt see pure, shining, and Yellow Gold.

XXX.

French.

Plus d’unze fois Luna Sol ne voudra,
Tous augmentes & baissez de degre,
Et si bas mis que peu d’Or on coudra,
Qu’apres faim, peste, descouvert le secret.

English.

The Moon will not have the Sun above eleven times,
Then both shall be encreased and lessened in degree,
And put so low, that a little Gold shall be sowed up,
So that after hunger and plague, the secret shall be discovered.

ANNOT.

The Moon will not have the Sun above eleven times; that is, the Moon of the Philosophers will not imbibe their Sun above Eleven times.

Then both shall be encreased and lessened in degree; that is, both shall be encreased in quality, and lessened in quantity.

And put so low that a little Gold shall be sowed up; that is, the powder of projection, or Philosophers stone shall be so small in Bulk, that one may sow it about him, and hide it in his Cloths.

After famine and plague the secret shall be discovered; that is, somebody shall die, with famine or plague, about which the secret shall be found and discovered.

[164]

XXXI.

French.

La Lune au plain de nuit sur le haut Mont,
Le nouveau Sophe d’Un seul cerveau la veu,
Par ses Disciples estre immortel semond,
Yeux au Midy, enfin, mains corps au feu.

English.

The Moon at full by night upon the high Mount,
The new Sophe with one onely Brain hath seen it,
Invited by his Disciples to become immortal,
His eyes to the South, conclusion, his hands and body to the fire.

ANNOT.

Sophe in Greek signifieth a wise man or Philosopher, who shall find the Philosophers stone, when the Moon shall come to the full in the night upon a high Mount. His Disciples shall perswade him to make himself immortal, they being perswaded that the Elixir cureth all diseases.

The last Verse saith, His eyes to the South, his hands and body to the fire; that is, this Chymist or Adeptus, shall retire into some Southern Countrey to work.

I cannot omit here that a conceited Chymist in Paris, whose name was Haumont, in English, Highmount, could not be disswaded but our Author spake of him in this Stanza, and that he could not die till he had got the Philosophers stone, but to other matters.

XXXII.

French.

Es lieux & temps chair au poisson donra lieu,
La loy commune sera faite au contraire,
Vieux tiendra fort puis osté du milieu,
Le Panta, Choina, Philon mis fort arriere.

English.

In places and times, flesh shall give place to fish,
The common Law shall be made against it,
The old man shall stand fast, then being taken away
The Panta, Choina, Philon, shall be set aside.

ANNOT.

Panta, Choina, Philon, are three Greek words, παντὰ χοινα φιλῶν, which signifie in Latine, omnia inter amicos communia, and in English, all things are common among friends. The rest is easie.

XXXIII.

French.

Jupiter joint plus Venus qu’a la Lune,
Apparoissant de plenitude blanche,
Venus cachée soubs la blancheur Neptune,
De Mars frappée par la gravée branche.
[165]

English.

Jupiter being more joyned to Venus then to the Moon,
Appearing in a full whiteness,
Venus being hid under the whiteness of Neptune,
Stricken by Mars through the ingraved branch.

ANNOT.

These terms being Astronomical and Astrological, it is hard to guess at the Authors mind.

XXXIV.

French.

Le grand mené captif d’estrange Terre;
Dor enchainé au Roy Cheyren offert,
Qui dans Ausonne, Milan perdra la Guerre,
Et tout son Ost mis a Feu & a Fer.

English.

The great one brought Prisoner from a far Countrey,
And chained with Gold, shall be presented to the King Chyren,
Being then at Ausone. Milan shall loose the War.
And all its Host shall be put to fire and sword.

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that when a great one from a far Countrey, shall be brought Prisoner chained with gold, and presented to a King called Henry (for Cheyren by transposition of letters is Henry) who then shall beat Bordeaux; Milan shall loose a great Army.

XXXV.

French.

Le feu esteint, les vierges trahiront,
La plus grand part de la bande nouvelle,
Pouldre a feu les seuls Rois garderont,
Hetrusque & Corse, de nuit, gorge alumelle.

English.

The fire being put out, the Virgins shall betray,
The greatest part of the new troup,
Gunpowder, Lance, shall keep only the Kings,
In Hetruria and Corsica by night throats shall be cut.

ANNOT.

Hetruria is the Country Tuscany now under the Duke of Florence, and Corsica is an Island in the Mediterranean Sea belonging to the Genoese. The rest is plain.

[166]

XXXVI.

French.

Les jeux nouveaux en Gaule redressez,
Apres Victoire de l’Insubre Campagne,
Monts d’Hesperie, les grands liez troussez,
De peur trembler la Romagne & l’Espagne.

English.

The new plays shall be set up again in France,
After the Victory obtained in Piemont,
Mountains of Spain, the great ones tied, carried away,
Romania and Spain shall quake for fear.

ANNOT.

This is a Prognostication of the rejoycing that should be in France, after the winning of that famous battle Serizoles in Piemont, against the Armies of the Emperour and the King of Spain.

XXXVII.

French.

Gaulois par saults Monts viendra penetrer,
Occupera le grand Mont de l’Insubre,
Au plus profond son Ost sera entrer,
Genes, Monech pousseront classe rubre.

English.

The French by leaping shall go over the Mountains,
And shall seize upon the great Mount of the Savoyard,
He shall cause his Army to go to the furthermost,
Genoa, and Monaco shall set out their red Fleet.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is concerning Henry the IV. King of France, who went over the Alpes and conquered the Duke of Savoy’s Countrey, because he would not restore the Markdom of Salvees. Genoa and Monaco are Cities near Savoy.

XXXVIII.

French.

Pendant que Duc, Roy, Roine occupera,
Chef Bizantin captif en Samothrace,
Avant lassault l’un l’autre mangera,
Rebours ferré suivra du sang la trace.

English.

While the Duke shall busie the King and the Queen,
A great man of Constantinople shall be prisoner in Samothracia,
Before the assault one shall eat up the other,
Rebours shod shall trace one by the blood.

[167]

ANNOT.

The three first Verses are plain, as for the fourth, either it is falsly Printed, or I must confess I understand it not.

XXXIX.

French.

Les Rhodiens demanderont secours,
Par le neglect de ses hoirs delaissée,
L’Empire Arabe ravalera son cours,
Par Hesperie la cause redressée.

English.

The Rhodiens shall ask for succours,
Being forsaken by the neglect of her Heirs,
The Arrabian Empire shall slack his course,
By the means of Spain the case shall be mended.

ANNOT.

By the Rhodians are understood the Knights of Maltha, because they dwelt first at Rhodes.

By the second Verse it is said, it was the neglect of her Heirs, that is of the Heirs of Rhodes the Knights of Maltha, who being careless of themselves, were besieged by Solyman, which constrained them to ask succours of all the Christian Princes, which came very slowly, at last Dom Garcia Viceroy of Sicily relieved them, and drove away the Turks that had suffered great loss, therefore the Author saith in the third Verse, The Arabian Empire shall slack his course.

XL.

French.

Les Forteresses des Assiegez serrez,
Par poudre a feu profondez en abysme,
Les proditeurs seront tous vifs serrez,
Onc aux Sacristes navint si piteux schisme.

English.

The strong places of the Besieged shall be straightned,
By Gunpowder they shall be plonged into a pit,
The Traytors shall be shut up alive,
Never did happen so pitiful schisme to the Sacristes.

ANNOT.

By the Sacristes, he understandeth the Clergy of the Roman Religion.

XLI.

French.

Gynique Sexe captive par Hostage,
Viendra de nuit custodes decevoir,
Le Chef du Camp deceu par son language,
Lairra la gente, sera piteux a voir.
[168]

English.

Gynical sexe being captive by Hostage,
Shall come by night to deceive her keepers,
The Chief of the Camp being deceived by her Language,
Shall leave her folks, a thing pitiful to behold.

ANNOT.

Gynical Sex is a woman from the Greek word γυνὴ, which signifieth a woman.

The meaning then of this Stanza is, that a woman being given in Hostage, and made prisoner, shall deceive her keepers, and among the rest, the chief Captain who shall forsake his Troops and run away with her.

XLII.

French.

Geneve & Langres par ceux de Chartre & Dole,
Et par Grenoble captif au Montlimar,
Seysset, Lausane, par fraudulente dole,
Les trahiront pour Or soixante mark.

English.

Geneve and Langres by those of Chartres and Dole,
And by one of Grenoble captive at Montlimar,
Seisset, Lozanne by a fraudulent deceit,
Shall betray them for thirty pounds weight of Gold.

ANNOT.

All those Towns are in France, the sense is plain.

XLIII.

French.

Seont ouis au Ciel les Armes battre,
Celuy an mesme les Divins ennemis,
Voudront Loix Saintes injustement debatre,
Par Foudre & guerre bien croians a mort mis.

English.

There shall be heard in the Air noise of Weapons,
And in that same year the Divines shall be enemies,
They shall unjustly put down the Holy Laws,
And by the Thunder and the War true believers shall die.

ANNOT.

There is no obscurity in this.

[169]

XLIV.

French.

Deux gros de Mende, de Rhodez, & Millaud,
Cahors, Limoges, Castre, malo sepmano,
De nuech l’intrado, de Bourdeaux an cailhau,
Par Perigort au toc de la Campano.

English.

Two great ones of Mende, of Rhodez and Milliaud,
Cahors, Limoges, Castres an evil week,
By night the entry shall be from Bourdeaux one cailhau,
Through Perigort at the ringing of the Bell.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is half French and half Provencal language.

All the Cities named here, Mende, Rhodez, Milliaud, Cahors, Limoges, Castres, Bourdeaux, Perigort, are Cities of France, bordering upon Provence, which is the Countrey wherein our Author was born.

The meaning of it is, that all those Cities shall rise against the Collectors of the Kings Taxes, and shall set upon them by the sound of the Bell, which is already come to pass, and may come to pass yet.

XLV.

French.

Par conflict, Roy Regne abandonera,
Le plus grand Chef faillira au besoing,
Morts, profligez peu en rechapera,
Tous destrenchez un en sera tesmoin.

English.

By a Battle the King shall forsake his Kingdom,
The greatest Commander, shall fail in time of need,
They shall be killed and routed, few shall escape,
They shall be cut off, one only shall be left for a witness.

ANNOT.

This is a Prognostication of a great Battle, by the loss of which a King shall forsake his Kingdom, his chief Commander having deserted him in time of need. The slaughter shall be so great, that none shall be left but one for a witness.

XLVI.

French.

Bien defendu le fait par excellence,
Garde toy Tours de ta proche ruine,
Londres & Nantes par Rheims fera defence,
Ne passes outre au temps de la bruine.
[170]

English.

The fact shall be defended excellently well
Tours beware of thy approaching ruine,
London and Nantes by Rhemes shall stand upon their defence,
Do not go further in foggy weather.

ANNOT.

Tours is the chief City of a Province in France, called Touraine, which is commended here for having resisted excellently well; but is forewarned to look to her self after that, and to beware of her approaching ruine.

XLVII.

French.

Le noir farouche quand aura essayé,
Sa main sanguine par feu, fer, arcs tendus,
Trestout le peuple sera tant effrayé,
Voir les plus grands par col & pieds pendus.

English.

The wild black one, after he shall have tryed,
His bloody hand by fire, Sword, bended Bows,
All the people shall be so frighted,
To see the greatest hanged by the neck and feet.

ANNOT.

It is a description of a Tyrant, who after he shall have tryed his bloody hand by Fire, Sword, and bent Bows, shall cause his chief men to be hanged by the neck and feet. Since the Author did write there had been such a Tyrant in the world, namely, John Basilides, great Duke of Russia, in the year 1572. Read Paul Osburne in his Life.

XLVIII.

French.

Planure Ausone fertile spacieuse,
Produira taons, & tant de sauterelles,
Clarte solairé deviendra nubilense,
Ronger le rout, grand peste venir delles.

English.

The Plain about Bourdeaux fruitful and spacious,
Shall produce so many Hornets and so many Grashopers,
That the light of the Sun shall be darkened,
They shall crap all, a great plague shall come from them.

ANNOT.

I cannot find in History that this hath yet happened, since the writing of these Prophecies, therefore I reckon it de futuro.

[171]

XLIX.

French.

Devant le peuple sang sera respandu,
Qui du haut Ciel ne viendra esloigner,
Mais d’un long temps ne sera entendu,
L’Esprit d’un seul le viendra tesmoigner.

English.

Before the people blood shall be spilt,
Who Shall not come far from the high Heaven,
But it shall not be heard of for a great while,
The Spirit of one shall come to witness it.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is concerning some just person, that shall be murdered openly: His blood shall cry to Heaven, but shall not be heard for a good while, till at last it shall be discovered by some body.

L.

French.

Libra verra regner les Hesperies,
De Ciel & Terre tenir la Monarchie,
D’Asie forces nul ne verra peries,
Que sept ne tiennent par rang la Hierarchie.

English.

Libra shall see Spain to Reign,
And have the Monarchy of Heaven and Earth,
No body shall see the forces of Asia to perish,
Till seven have kept the Hierarchy successively.

ANNOT.

Libra is one of the twelve signs of the Zodiack, which is favourable to Spain, so that the meaning of this is, that Libra shall see Spain to Reign.

And besides that, to have the Monarchy of Heaven and Earth; that is, to have the command of the Pope, and of the best part of Europe. So that no Asian or Turkish forces shall receive damage by the Christians, till seven Popes of the Spanish faction have Reigned successively, and one after another.

LI.

French.

Un Duc cupide son ennemy poursuivre,
Dans entrera empeschant la Phalange,
Hastez a pied si pres viendront poursuivre,
Que la journée conflite aupres du Gange.
[172]

English.

A Duke being earnest in the pursute of his enemy
Shall come in, hindering the Phalange,
Hastened on foot shall follow them so close,
That the day of the Battle shall be near Ganges.

ANNOT.

A Phalange, in Latine Phalanx, is a Squadron of Souldiers, which word was anciently proper only to the Macedonians. Ganges is a River in India.

LII.

French.

En Cité obsesse aux murs hommes & femmes,
Ennemis hors, le chef prest a soy rendre,
Vent sera fort encontre les gens darmes,
Chassez seront par chaux, poussiere & cendre.

English.

In a besieged City, men and women being upon the walls,
The enemies without, the Governour ready to surrender,
The Wind shall be strong against the Souldiers,
They shall be driven away by lime, dust, and ashes.

ANNOT.

This is a peculiar and remarkable accident, wherein the besiegers of a City shall be driven away from their enterprise, by Lime, Dust, and Ashes, scattered and dispersed against them by a mighty wind.

LIII.

French.

Les fugitifs & bannis revoqués,
Peres & Fils garnissant les hauts puits,
Le cruel pere & les tiens suffoquez,
Son Fils plus pire submergé dans le puits.

English.

The runnaways and banished men being recalled,
Fathers and Sons garnishing the high wells,
The cruel father and his retinue shall be suffocated,
His Son being worse, shall be drowned in the Well.

ANNOT.

The words are plain, out of which every one may make his own sense.

[173]

LIV.

French.

Du nom qui on ne fut au Roy Gaulois,
Jamais ne fut un Foudre si craintif,
Tremblant l’Italie, l’Espagne, & les Anglois,
De femmes estrangeres grandement attentif.

English.

Of the name that a French King never was,
There was never a Lightning so much feared,
Italy shall tremble, Spain and the English,
He shall be much taken with women strangers.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth that when a French King shall have a name that never any of his Predecessors had, he shall be so much feared as that Italy, Spain, and England shall tremble, and that besides he shall be much given to women.

LV.

French.

Quand la Corneille sur Tour de Brique jointe,
Durant sept heures ne fera que crier,
Mort presagée, de sang Statue teinte,
Tyran meurdry, aux Dieux peuple prier.

English.

When the Crow upon a Tower made of Brick,
For seven hours shall do nothing but cry,
Death shall be foretold, and the Statue died with blood,
Tyrant shall be murdered, and the people pray to the Gods.

ANNOT.

This extraordinary Prodigy of a Crow crying for seven hours together upon a Brick Tower, foretelleth that some notorious Tyrant shall be put to death, and his statue sprinkled with blood, and withall, that the people either for joy or fear shall be much given to prayer.

LVI.

French.

Apres Victoire de rabieuse Langue,
L’Esprit tempté, en tranquil & repos,
Victeur sauguin par conflict, fait Harangue,
Roustir la Langue, & la Chair & les Os.

English.

After the Victory got over a raging tongue,
The mind that was tempted, shall be in tranquility and rest,
The bloody Conqueror by Battle shall make a Speech,
And roast the tongue, the flesh, and the bones.

[174]

ANNOT.

It is a Conquerour who having been much railed at by his enemies, shall in conclusion after he hath overcome them, take a severe vengeance of them.

LVII.

French.

Ignare envie au grand Roy supportée,
Tiendra propos deffendre les escrits,
Sa femme non femme par un autre tentée,
Plus double deux ira au fort de cris.

English.

Ignorant envy being supported by the great King,
Shall talk of prohibiting the writtings,
His wife no wife, being tempted by another,
Shall more then they two prevail by crying.

ANNOT.

Some ignorant envious person being in favour with the King, shall go about to suppress learning, but the Kings wife no wife, that is his Concubine, shall persuade him to the contrary, and shall prevail.

LVIII.

French.

Soleil ardent dans la gosier couler,
De sang humain arrouser Terre Etrusque,
Chef seille d’eau, mener son fils filer,
Captive Dame conduite Terre Turque.

English.

Burning Sun shall be poured into the throat,
This human blood shall wet the Hetrurian ground,
The chief pale of water, shall lead his son to Spin,
A captive Lady shall be carried into the Turkish Countrey.

ANNOT.

By burning Sun must be understood melted gold, which shall be poured into ones throat, in the Hetrurian ground, that is in Tuscany.

By the chief Pale of water is to be understood, some Water-bearer, who shall make his son an Eunuch to make benefit on’t. The fourth Verse is plain.

LIX.

French.

Deux assiegez en ardante ferveur,
De soif estaints pour deux plaines Tasses;
Le fort limé & un vieillard resueur,
Au Genois, de Nizza monstrera trace.
[175]

English.

Two besieged, being in a burning heat,
Shall die for thirst, want of two Bowls full,
The Fort being filed, an old doting man,
Shall show to the Genoese the way to Nizza.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain. The two last Verses signifie that an old doting man shall shew to the Genoeses the way how to take Nizza, a Town hard by them, by filing some Iron Grates, by which they shall get into the Town.

LX.

French.

Les sept enfans en Hostage laissez,
Le tiers viendra son enfant trucider,
Deux par son fils seront d’estoc percez,
Genes, Florence les viendra seconder.

English.

The seven Children being left in Hostage,
The third shall come to kill his child,
Two by their sons shall be run through,
Genoa and Florence shall second them.

ANNOT.

The words being so plain, every body may give as good an interpretation as I.

LXI.

French.

Le vieux mocqué & privé de sa place,
Par l’Estranger qui le subornera,
Mais de son filz mangé devant sa face,
Le Frere a Chartres. Orl. Rouen trahira.

English.

The old man shall be baffled and deprived of his place,
By the stranger that shall suborn him,
But of his son shall be eaten before his face,
The Brother at Chartres. Orl. shall betray Rouen.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is divided into two parts. The first part runneth from the first Verse to the middle of the fourth. The meaning is, that an old man shall be baffled and deprived of his place by a stranger that shall suborn him, but that strangers sons brother shall be eaten up before his face in the Town of Chartres; what he meaneth by eaten up, is hard to guess, whether it be by poverty, sutes at Law, Envy, Lice, &c.

The Hemisthikion of the last Verse, Orl. shall betray Rouen, signifieth, that Orleans shall betray Rouen.

[176]

LXII.

French.

Un Coronel machine ambition,
Se saisira de la plus grande Armée,
Contre son Prince feinte invention,
Et descouvert sera soubs sa ramée.

English.

A Colonel deviseth a plot by his ambition,
He shall seize upon the best part of the Army,
Against his Prince he shall have a fained invention,
And shall be discovered under the Harbour of the Vine.

ANNOT.

I never saw the last Tyrant Cromwel better painted to the life, then in the three first Verses.

As for the fourth, it is certain that his intention among his Camerades was first discovered by him unto them at the Star Tavern in Coleman-street, which is the place that the Author calleth the Harbour of the Vine.

LXIII.

French.

L’Armée Celtique contre les Montagnars,
Qui seront sus & pris a la pipée,
Paisants irez pulseront tost faugnars,
Precipitez tous au fil de l’Espée.

English.

The Celtique Army shall go against the Highlanders,
Who shall stand upon their guard, and be taken with Bird-lime twigs,
The Peasant being angry, shall roll down the stones,
They shall be all put to the edge of the sword.

ANNOT.

This is a description of the attempt made by the French upon Savoy, which Countrey lieth in the Mountains of the Alpes, therefore called here Highlanders; where the Peasants being incensed for the loss of their goods and the ruine of their Countrey, rolled stones from the top of the Mountains against the French Army, which could not hinder them from being destroyed; this came to pass under Henry the IV. King of France, in the year 1662.

LXIV.

French.

Le defaillant en habit de Bourgeois,
Viendra le Roy tenter de son offence,
Quinze Soldats la pluspart Villageois,
Vie derniere & chef de sa chevance.
[177]

English.

The guilty, in a Citizens habit,
Shall come to tempt the King concerning his offence,
Fifteen Soldiers the most part Countrey men,
The last shall be his life, and the best part of his Estate.

ANNOT.

This signifieth that a great man having committed an offence against the King, shall come to him in a mean habit, to sue for his Pardon, and shall be carried away by fifteen Souldiers, the most part Countrey fellows; and in conclusion he shall have his life saved, and the best part of his Estate.

LXV.

French.

Au deserteur de la grand Forteresse,
Apres qu’aura son lieu abandonné,
Son adversaire fera si grand provesse,
L’Empereur tost mort sera condamné.

English.

After that the desertor of the great Fort,
Shall have forsaken his place,
His adversary shall do so great feats,
That the Emperor, shall soon be condemned to death.

ANNOT.

This is plain.

LXVI.

French.

Soubs couleur feinte de sept testes rasées,
Seront formez divers explorateurs,
Puits & Fontains de poison arrousées,
Au Fort de Genes humains devorateurs.

English.

Under the fained colour of seven shaven heads,
Shall divers spies be framed,
Wells and Fountains shall be sprinkled with poison,
In the Fort of Genoa shall be humane devourers.

ANNOT.

The three first Verses belong to the same sense; viz. that seven men shall be spies, under pretence to be Priests or Monks, (which is the meaning of the shaven heads) and shall poison the Wells and Springs.

The last Verse signifieth that in the Fort of Genoa, their shall be devourers of men, that is, Usurers and Extortioners, which is no new thing in that Nation.

[178]

LXVII.

French.

L’An que Saturne & Mars esgaux combust,
L’Air fort seiché, longue trajection,
Par feux secrets d’ardeur grands lieux adust,
Peu pluye, Vent chauds, Guerres, Incursions.

English.

In the year that Saturn and Mars shall be fiery,
The Air shall be very dry, in many Countreys,
By secret fires, many places shall be burnt with heat,
There shall be scarcity of Rain, hot Winds, Wars, in-roads.

ANNOT.

This is the Prognostication of a mighty dry season, and other accidents that shall happen when Saturn and Mars shall be in a fiery disposition, which whether it be by Opposition, Conjunction, Aspect, &c. Let the Astrologers judge.

LXVIII.

French.

En l’an bien proche non esloigné de Venus,
Les deux plus grands de l’Asie & d’Affrique,
Du Rhine & Ister qu’on dira sont venus,
Cris, pleurs a Malthe, & coste Ligustique.

English.

In a year that is to come shortly, and not far from Venus,
The two greatest ones of Asia and Affrica,
Shall be said to come from the Rhine and Ister,
Crying, and tears shall be at Maltha and in the Ligurian shore.

ANNOT.

The Rhine is a River in Germany, Ister is another in the Countrey of Istria, belonging to the Venetians.

By the first Verse, I conclude that this Prophecy came to pass a little while after the Author wrote this Book, when the grand Segnor Solyman besieged Maltha, and put in fear all the Ligurian Coast, which is that of Genoa.

LXIX.

French.

La Cité grande les exilez tiendront,
Les Citadins morts, meurtris & chassez,
Ceux d’Aquilee a Parme promettront,
Monstrer l’entrée par les lieux non tracez.
[179]

English.

The banished shall keep the great City,
The Citizens being dead, murdered and expelled,
Those of Aquileia shall promise to Parma,
To shew the entrance by unknown paths.

ANNOT.

Aquileia and Parma are two Cities in Italy. The rest is easie.

LXX.

French.

Bien contigu des grands Monts Pyrenées,
Un contre l’Aigle grand copie, adresser,
Ouvertes veines, forces exterminées,
Que jusqu’au Pau le chief viendra chasser.

English.

Near the great Pyrenean Mountains,
One shall raise a great Army against the Eagle,
Veins shall be opened, forces driven out,
So that the chief shall be driven as far as the Pau.

ANNOT.

By the Eagle here is understood the Empire; because his Ensign is an Eagle.

LXXI.

French.

En lieu d’Espouse les Filles trucidées,
Meurtre a grand faute, ne sera superstite,
Dedans le puis vestues inondées,
L’Espouse esteinte par haut d’Aconite.

English.

Instead of the Bride, the Maid shall be killed,
The murder shall be a great fault, none shall be surviving,
In the Well they shall be drowned with their Cloaths,
The Bride shall be extinguished by an high Aconite.

ANNOT.

This is a Prophecie of a Tragical Nuptial, where all the Maids shall be drowned with their Cloaths in a Well, insomuch that none shall survive, and the Bride shall be poisoned, and die by Aconite, which is one of the most poisonous herbs that is, witness Juvinal: Lurida terribiles miscent asonita novercæ.

LXXII.

French.

Les Artomiques par Agen & Lectoure,
A saint Felix feront leur Parliament,
Ceux de Bazas viendront a la malhoure,
Saisir Condon & Marsan promptement.
[180]

English.

The Artomiques through Agen and Lectoure,
Shall keep their Parliament at Saint Fœlix,
These of Bazas shall come in an unhappy hour,
To seize upon Condon and Marsan speedily.

ANNOT.

By the Artomiques he meaneth the Protestants; because they take the Communion with leavened Bread, which in Greek is called Artos.

Agen, Lectoure, saint Fœlix, Bazas, Condon and Marzan, are Cities of Gascony. The rest is plain.

LXXIII.

French.

Le neveu grand par force prouvera,
Le peche fait de Cœur pusillanime,
Ferrare & Ast le Duc esprouvera,
Par lors qu’au soir sera le Pantomime.

English.

The great nephew by force shall provoke,
The sin committed by the pusillanimous heart,
Ferrara and Ast shall make tryal of the Duke,
When the Pantomime shall be in the evening.

ANNOT.

To understand the whole sense of this, we must first know what is meant by the particular terms.

The great Nephew is the Brother or Sisters son of some great person, who by force shall discover the Treason or Cowardise, committed by some pusillanimous or fearful man.

Ferrara and Ast are two towns in Italy, shall make tryal of a Duke, by being either taken or assaulted.

When the Pantomime shall be in the evening; that is, when the Comedy shall be acted; for Pantomime in Greek signifieth a Comedian.

LXXIV.

French.

Du lac Leman & ceux des Brannonices,
Tous assemblez contre ceux d’Aquitaine,
Germans beaucoup encores plus Sovisses,
Seronts des faits avec ceux du Maine.
[181]

English.

From lake Leman, and from the Brannonues,
They shall be gathered against those of Aquitania,
Great many Germans, and many more Switzers,
Shall be routed together with those of Maine.

ANNOT.

Lake Leman, is the Lake of Geneva. The Brannonices are those of Sens, so called; because they took Rome under the Conduct of their Captain Brennus, and afterwards built Brenona, a Town belonging since to the Venetians, who calls it Verona.

Aquitania is that Province of France, called now Gascony. Maine is a Province in France. The rest needeth no explication.

LXXV.

French.

Prest a combattre fera defection,
Chef adversaire obtiendra la victoire,
Larriere garde fera defension,
Les defaillans morts au blanc terretoire.

English.

One being ready to fight, shall faint,
The chief of the adverse party shall obtain the victory,
The rearegard, shall withstand it out,
Those that fall away shall die in the white Terretory.

ANNOT.

There is nothing difficult here, but what he meaneth by the white Terretory, whether it be positive, or Allegorical, I leave the judgement of it to the Reader.

LXXVI.

French.

Les Nictobriges par ceux de Perigort,
Seront vexez tenants jusques au Rhosne,
L’Associé de Gascons & Bigorre,
Trahir le Temple le prestre estant au Prosne.

English.

The Nictobriges by those of Perigort,
Shall be vexed as far as the Rhosne,
The associate of the Gascons and Bigorre,
Shall betray the Church while the Priest is in his Pulpit.

ANNOT.

Nictobriges in Greek signifieth a people living in a dark and moist Countrey. Perigort and Bigorre are two Towns in France. The rest is plain.

[182]

LXXVII.

French.

Selyn Monarque, l’Italie pacifique,
Regnes unis, Roy Chrestien du monde,
Mourant voudra coucher en Terre Blesique,
Apres Pyrates avoir chassé de L’onde.

English.

Selyn being Monarch, Italy shall be in peace,
Kingdoms shall be united, a Christian King of the world,
Dying, shall desire to be buried in the Countrey of Blois,
After he shall have driven the Pyrates from the Sea.

ANNOT.

Selyn is the name of a Turkish Emperour, the meaning therefore of this, is, that under the Reign of one Selyn a Turkish Emperour, Italy shall be in peace, and all the Christian Princes united.

LXXVIII.

French.

La grand Armée de la pugne civile,
Pour de nuit Parme a l’Estranger trouvée,
Septante neuf meurtris dedans la Ville,
Les estrangers passez tous a l’Espée.

English.

The great Army belonging to the Civil War,
Having found by night Parma possessed by Strangers,
Shall kill seventy nine in the Town,
And put all the Strangers to the Sword.

ANNOT.

Parma is a City in Italy. The rest is plain.

LXXIX.

French.

Sang Royal fuis, Monheurt, Mars. Aiguillon,
Remplis seront de Bourdelois les Landes.
Navarre, Bigorre, pointes & Aiguillons,
Profonds de faim, vorer de Liege, Glandes.

English.

Royal blood run away from Monheurt, Marsan, Aiguillon,
The Landes shall be full of Bourdeloir,
Navarre, Bigorre, shall have points and Pricks.
Being deep in hunger, they shall devour the Cork and Akorns.

[183]

ANNOT.

Monheurt, Marsan, Aiguillon, are Towns in Gascony.

Landes is a desert Countrey, wherein nothing groweth but Pine-trees, Bourdelois are those of Bourdeaux.

Navarre is a Kingdom, and Begorre a Province joyning to those Landes, or Pine-trees Countrey.

LXXX.

French.

Pres du grand Fleuve, grand fosse, terre egeste,
En quinze parts l’eau sera divisée,
La Cité prinse, feu, sang, cris, conflict mettre,
Et la plus part concerne au collisée.

English.

Near the great River, a great pit, Earth digged out,
In fifteen parts the Water shall be divided,
The City taken, fire, blood, cries, fighting,
And the greatest part concerneth the Collisés.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy was fulfilled, when Rome was taken and sacked by Charles Duke of Bourbon, and Philibert of Chalon Prince of Orenge, Generals of the Emperour Charles the V. with such cruelties, as never was committed by the bloody Goths and Vandales, and to shew that the Author intended Rome, is apparant by two instances. The first is by the great River, which is the Tyber, which though not very great in its Channel and depth, yet is very great, yea, the greatest in Europe by its fame. The other is the word Colisée, which is that famous Arch of Traian in Rome, remaining yet to this day.

LXXXI.

French.

Pont on fera promptement de nacelles,
Passer l’Armée du grand Prince Belgique,
Dans profondres, & non loing de Bruxelles,
Outrepassez detrenchez sept a picque.

English.

A Bridge of Boats shall suddenly be made,
To pass over the Army of the great Belgick Prince,
In deep places, and not far from Bruxelles,
Being gone over, there shall be seven cut with a Pike.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the Siege of Antwerp by the Prince of Parma, Governour of the Low-Countreys for the King of Spain, who having besieged, caused a Bridge of Boats to be made upon the River Scheld, to hinder the succours of the Hollanders, who by that means were constrained to surrender it.

[184]

LXXXII.

French.

Amas sapproche venant d’Esclavonie,
L’Olestant vieux Cité ruinera,
Fort desolée verra sa Romanie,
Puis la grand flamme estaindre ne scaura.

English.

A great troop gathered, shall come from Sclavonia,
The old Olestant shall ruine a City,
He shall see his Romania very desolate,
And after that, shall not be able to quench that great flame.

ANNOT.

That great troop from Sclavonia shall be the Venetians, because they possess most part of that Countrey. The old Olestant is their Duke, because he is not chosen unless he be very old, by Romania is understood what the Venetians possess in that Countrey.

LXXXIII.

French.

Combat nocturne le vaillant Capitaine,
Vaincu fuira, peu de gens profligé,
Son peuple esmeu, sedition non vain,
Son propre fils le tiendra assiegé.

English.

In a fight by night, the valliant Captain,
Being vanquished shall run away, overcome by few,
His people being moved, shall make no small mutiny,
His own son shall besiege him.

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

LXXXIV.

French.

Un grand d’Auxerre mourra bien miserable,
Chassé de ceux qui soubs luy ont esté.
Serré de chaines, apres d’un rude cable,
En l’an que Mars, Venus & Sol mis en Esté.

English.

A great man of Auxerre shall die very miserably,
Being expelled by those that have been under him,
Bound with Chains, and after that with a strong Cable,
In the year that Mars, Venus, and Sol shall be in a conjunction in the Summer.

[185]

ANNOT.

Auxerre is a City of France, distant from Paris 40. leagues to the Southward.

LXXXV.

French.

Le Charbon blanc du noir sera chassé,
Prisonier fait, mené au Tombereau,
More Chameau sus pieds entrelassez,
Lors le puisné fillera l’Aubereau.

English.

The white Coal shall be expelled by the black one,
He shall be made Prisoner, carried in a Dung-cart,
His feet twisted upon a black Camel,
Then the youngest, shall suffer the Hobby to have more thread.

ANNOT.

The first Verse is altogether Allegorical and Metaphorical, therefore I leave it to the judgement of every Reader. I shall only deliver my opinion upon the whole: I take it to be some white Prince, that shall be overcome by a black one, put in a Dungcart, after that, tied upon a black Camel, and then the younger son of that black Prince shall give the prisonner a little more liberty.

LXXXVI.

French.

L’An que Saturne en eau sera conjoint,
Avecques Sol le Roy fort & puissant,
A Rheims & Aix sera receu & oingt,
Apres Conquestes meurtrira innocens.

English.

In the year that Saturn in Aquarius shall be in conjunction
With Sol, the King being strong and powerful,
Shall be received and Anointed at Rheines and Aix,
After Conquest he shall murder innocent persons.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy is remarkable for the things that it foretelleth, viz. that in the year that Saturn shall be in conjunction with Sol in the Sign of Aquarius, a King of France shall be annointed both at Rhemes and Aix, for Rhemes is a City in France, where the Kings use to be Annointed and Crowned, and Aix is another in Germany, where the Emperours use to be so. But the last Verse is ominous, where he saith, that after his Conquests he shall murder innocent persons.

LXXXVII.

French.

Un fils de Roy tant de Langues apprins,
A son Aisné au Regne different,
Son Pere beau au plus grand fils comprins,
Fera perir principal adherent.
[186]

English.

A son of a King having learned divers Languages,
Shall fall out with his elder Brother for the Kingdom,
His father in Law being more concerned with his elder son,
Shall cause the principal adherent to perish.

ANNOT.

One King shall have two Sons, the eldest shall succeed him in the Kingdom, the youngest having been well brought up and educated, shall raise troubles, against the King his Brother; but he shall be destroyed by the means of his own Father in Law.

LXXXVIII.

French.

La grand Antoine du nom de fait sordide,
De Phtyriase a son dernier rongé,
Un qui de plomb voudra este cupide,
Passant le port d’Esleu sera plongé.

English.

The great Antony by name, but in effect sordid,
Of Phtyriasis shall at last be eaten up,
One that shall be covetous of Lead,
Going upon Port d’Esleu shall fall into the Water.

ANNOT.

Phtyriasis in Greek is the disease called by the Latines Morbus pedicularis, when one is devoured by Lice, as were Herodes, Sylla, Pherecydes, and Philip II. King of Spain, &c.

As for Port d’Esleu, the question is, whether it be the proper name of a place, or the name of a man, that shall throw another in the water.

LXXXIX.

French.

Trente de Londres secret conjureront,
Contre Leur Roy, sur le pont l’Entreprise,
Les Satellites la mort desgouteront,
Un Roy esleu blond & natif de Frize.

English.

Thirty of London shall secretly conspire,
Against their King, upon the Bridge the Plot shall be made,
These Satellites shall taste of death,
A King shall be elected, fair, and born in Friezeland.

ANNOT.

Here may be alleadged that passage of Scripture, There is nothing so secret but shall be revealed; for here is plainly told the number of those wicked persons, who conspired against their lawful Sovereign King Charles I. of blessed memory, as also the place where the Plot was first laid; for it is well known that they used to assemble at the Bear at the Bridge foot.

[187]

XC.

French.

Les deux copies au murs ne pourront joindre,
Dans cet instant trembler Milan, Thesin,
Faim soif, doutance si fort les viendront prendre,
Chair, pain, ne vivres nauront un seul boucin.

English.

The two Armies shall not be able to joyn by the Walls,
At that instant Milan and Thesin shall tremble,
Hunger, thirst, and fear shall so seize upon them,
They shall not have a bit of meat, bread, nor victuals.

ANNOT.

Milan is a City in Italy, and Thesin is the River that passeth by it.

XCI.

French.

Au Duc Gaulois contraint battre au Duelle,
La nef de Mole, Monech naprochera,
Tort accuse, prison perpetuelle,
Son Fils regner avant mort taschera.

English.

A French Duke compelled to fight a Duel,
The Ship of Mole shall not come near Monaco,
Wrongfully accused shall have a perpetual Prison,
His son shall endeavour to Reign before his death.

ANNOT.

To understand this Stanza, we must suppose four Histories, Paradin relateth the first, which is, that the French and Spanish Armies having their Winter quarters in the Dukedome of Milan, Anno 1555.

The Marquess of Pescaire, sent word to the Duke of Nemours, by a French Gentleman, that he and three more desired to break a Lance with him upon the borders of Ast.

The Duke accepted the challenge, without giving notice to the Marquess of Brissac, then General of the French Army, who was very angry at it, nevertheless he advised the Duke to go, but not with a Guilt and light Armour, but with a wrong one, such as became a Cavaliero, which he did not do, nor the other three that went with him: whence it came, that the Lord Classe a French man, running against Malespine, was wounded to death in the shoulder; nevertheless one of the seconds to the Duke of Nemours, the Lord Moncha killed upon the place Carassa, Nephew to pope Marcel II. and the Lord Manoa, one of the Duke of Nemours party, falling from his Horse a little wounded, broke his neck.

As for the Duke of Nemours, he ran twice against the said Marquess, without hitting one another, but at the third time they both brake their Lances, without doing any harm. Thus, the French Duke was compelled to fight a Duel.

We have the second History from Turpin, and many others, which is, that the Marquess of Masseran, having put himself into the King of France’s service, in hopes[188] to have the Government of Bielais; and proving a Traitor, the Marshal of Brissac, who had discovered his perfidiousness, resolved to take him in his house of Gaillany, which he had fortified to secure his retreat after his Treason.

The Lord de Termes was commanded to do it, which he did so dexterously, that he took him into his house after dinner, and then compelled him presently to surrender the Castle of Jamaglia, the Marquess obeying, sent thither presently his son Claudius, to put it into the hands of the Lords de la Mante, and of Villars.

These two viewing the Castle, to observe the places that might be fortified, and going from room to room, heard a lamentable voice, crying. Have mercy upon me. They caused presently the Prison doors to be opened, and found a poor Gentleman of Vercelle, whom the Marquess had detained there 18 years, for endeavouring to serve an execution against him, in the Duke of Savoy’s behalf.

And it is remarkable that his Imprisonment was all this while concealed, so that no body ever heard of it, in so much that his friends suspecting he had been killed by one of his enemies, they prosecuted him so hard, that after much tortering, he confessed what he had not done, and was consequently put to death in the presence of the said Marquess of Masseran, who knew the Countrey. Thus we see one wrongfully accused that was executed, and this Gentlemans Imprisonment, which was to be perpetual.

After this, they carryed the poor Gentleman almost all naked, and being nothing but skin and bones, to the Lord of Termes, who caused him to be clothed, and gave him Money to go back to his friends.

The third History is, that the Duke of Nemours Son was one of the chief ring-leaders of the League against Henry IV. and did what he could before he dyed to get the Kingdom of France, endeavouring first to make himself Sovereign Prince of Lion, Forrest, and Beaucolois.

The fourth History is, that at the latter end of the year 1555. the Lord la Mole carrying to Rome the Cardinals of Tournon and Lorrain, went directly to the Island of Corsica, whence he drew some Forces, which he joyned to his, and to those of Monluc, and would not Land at Monaco for some reasons, but went directly to Civita Vecchia. By this we understand that Verse of the Stanza. The Ship of the Mole shall not come near Monaco.

XCII.

French.

Teste trenchée du vaillant Capitaine,
Sera jettée devant son adversaire,
Son corps pendu de la Classe a l’Antenne,
Confus fuira par rames avent contraire.

English.

The head cut off the valliant Captain
Shall be thrown down before his adversary,
His body hanged at the Sails Yard,
Confused, they shall fly with Oars against the Wind.

ANNOT.

These words are plain enough, though no body can tell whether the thing is past already, or shall come to pass hereafter.

[189]

XCIII.

French.

Un Serpent veu proche du lict Royal,
Sera par Dame nuict chien n’abageronts
Lors nastre en France un Prince tant Royal,
Du Ciel venu tous les Princes verront.

English.

A Serpent shall be seen near the Royal bed,
By a Lady in the night, the Dogs shall not bark,
Then shall be born in France a Prince so Royal,
Come from Heaven all the Princes shall see it.

ANNOT.

This seemeth to be an allusion to the Birth of Alexander the great; for it is said, that when his mother Olympia proved with Child of him, there was seen in her Bed, and about her Bed a great Serpent, which was the presage of his future greatness: therefore our Author also will have, that when such a Prodigie shall appear in France, that then shall be born such a Prince as he mentioneth here: the circumstances are, that this Serpent shall be seen by a Lady in the night time, and that the Dogs of the house shall not bark at him.

XCIV.

French.

Deux grand, freres seront chassez d’Espagne,
Laisné vaincu soubs les Monts Pyrænæes,
Rougis Mer, Rhosne, sang Leman, d’Alemagne,
Narbon, Blyterre, d’Agath contaminées.

English.

Two great Brothers shall be driven from Spain,
The elder of them shall be overcome under the Pyrenean Mountains
Bloody Sea, Rhosne, Blood Leman of Germany,
Narbon, Bliterre of Agath polluted.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are easily understood by those that know the Pyrenean Mountains, to be those that part Spain from France. The two last Verses signifie there shall be bloody Wars in those places; the Rhosne is a swift River of France, that passeth through the City of Lyons; Leman is the Lake of Geneva, and Narbon is a City of Languedock.

XCV.

French.

Le Regne a deux laissé bien peu tiendront,
Trois ans sept mois passez feront la guerre,
Les deux vestales contre rebelleront,
Victor puisnay en Armorique Terre.
[190]

English.

The Kingdom being left to two, they shall keep it but a little while,
Three years and seven months being past, they shall make War,
The two Vestals shall rebel against them,
The youngest shall be Conquerour in the Armorick Countrey.

ANNOT.

This signifies, that a Kingdom shall be left to two, who shall keep it but a little while, about the space before mentioned.

By the two Vestals that shall rebel, are to be understood two Nuns, who having Interest in the state by their nearness of blood, shall challenge a title in the Kingdom. The last Verse signifies, that the youngest that contended for the Kingdom, shall overcome the eldest, in the Province of Gascony.

XCVI.

French.

La sœur aisnée de l’Isle Britannique,
Quinze ans devant le frere aura naissance,
Par son promis moyenant verifique,
Succedera au Regne de Balance.

English.

The eldest Sister of the Brittain Island,
Shall be born fifteen years before her Brother,
By what is promised her, and help of the truth,
She shall succeed in the Kingdom of Libra.

ANNOT.

This signifies, that the Princess born so long after her Brother, shall be married to a King of France, which is understood here by the Kingdom of Libra; therefore the last King Lewis the XIII. was called the Just, because born under the Sign of Libra.

XCVII.

French.

L’An que Mercure, Mars, Venus retrograde,
Du grand Monarque la ligne ne faillit,
Esleu du peuple Lusitant pres de Pactole,
Qu’en Paix & Regne viendra fort enveillir.

English.

When Mercury, Mars and Venus shall retrograde,
The Line of the great Monarch shall be wanting,
He shall be elected by the Lusitanians near Pactole,
And shall Reign in Peace a good while.

ANNOT.

This signifies the late change of state in Portugal, when they threw off the Spanish yoke, and chose a King amongst themselves, John the IV. Duke of Branganza, Father[191] to the present Queen of England; for by the Lusitanians are meant the Portugals, so called from their Countreys name Lusitania; Pactoles is the River that runs by Lisbonne, otherwise called Tagus, in Greek χροσοροος from the Sands.

XCVIII.

French.

Les Albanois passeront dedans Rome,
Moyennant Langres demipiler affubles,
Marquis & Duc ne pardonnes a l’homme,
Feu, sang, morbilles point d’eau, faillir les blés.

English.

The Albanians shall pass through Rome,
By the means of Langres covered with half Helmets,
Marquess and Duke shall spare no man,
Fire, blood, small Pox, Water shall fail us, also Corn.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that when the people of Albania lying between the Venetian Territories, and Grecia, shall come to Rome, by the means of a Bishop of Langres, who is a Duke and Peer of France; being covered with half Helmets, a kind of a Cap that they wear in War; then shall be fire, blood, small Pox, and want of Corn.

XCIX.

French.

L’Aisné vaillant de la fille du Roy,
Repoussera si profond les Celtiques,
Qu’il mettra Foudres, combien en tel arroy,
Peu & loing puis profond es Hesperiques.

English.

The valliant eldest son of the daughter of the King,
Shall beat back so far those of Flanders,
That he will cast Lightnings, O how many in such orders
Little and far, after shall go deep in Spain.

ANNOT.

This is scarce to be understood of any body, but the present King of France Lewis the XIV. who was the elder son, and born of Queen Ann, Daughter to the King of Spain, who by his valour and fortune made last year such progress in the Conquest of Flanders, that it hath caused admiration in every body; insomuch that is he do the like this year, it may be probably suspected, he will afterwards go deep into Spain according to the contents of this Prophecy.

C.

French.

Du feu Celeste au Royal edifice,
Quand la lumiere de Mars defaillira,
Sept mois grand Guerre, mort gent de malefice,
Rouen, Eureux au Roy ne faillira.
[192]

English.

Fire shall fall from the skies on the Kings Palace,
When Mars’s light shall be Ecclipsed,
A great War shall be for seven months, people shall die by witchcraft.
Rouen, and Eureux shall not be wanting to the King.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that when Mars is Ecclipsed, the Lightning shall fall on some of the King of Frances Palaces, then shall be a great War, for the space of seven Months, and many shall die by witchcraft; and Rouen the chief City of Normandy, and Eureux another of the same province, shall stick fast to the Kings Interest.


[193]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY V.

I.

French.

Avant venue de ruine Celtique,
Dedans le Temple d’eux parlementeront,
Poignard cœur d’un monté au coursier & picque,
Sans faire bruit le grand enterreront.

English.

Before the coming of the ruine of Flanders,
Two shall discourse together in the Church,
Dagger in the heart by one, on Horse-back and Spurring,
Without noise they shall bury the great one.

ANNOT.

This is a further specification of the whole ruine of Flanders, before which it shall happen, saith our Author, that two shall talk together in the Church, and one shall stabb the other with a Dagger, and then take Horse, and fly, the dead one being buried without Pompe or Ceremony.

[194]

II.

French.

Sept conjurez au Banquet feront luire,
Centre les trois le Fer hors de Navire.
L’un les deux classes au grand fera conduire,
Quand par le mail dernier au front luy tire.

English.

Seven Conspirators at a Banquet shall make their Iron glister
Against three, out of a Ship:
One shall carry the two Fleets to the great one,
When in the Palle-malle the last shall shoot him in the forehead.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses foretell a Conspiracy of seven against three, one of which seven shall carry both Fleets to some eminent person, at which time he shall be shot in the forehead by the last of the seven.

III.

French.

Le Successeur de la Duché viendra,
Beaucoup plus outre que la Mer de Toscane,
Gauloise branche la Florence tiendra,
Dans son Giron d’accord nautique Rane.

English.

The Successor to the Dukedom shall come,
Far beyond the Tuscane Sea,
A French branch shall hold Florence
In its Lap, to which the Sea-frog shall agree.

ANNOT.

By the two first Verses is meant a lawful Successor to the Duke of Tuscany who shall come to recover the said Dukedom, which shall then be in the possession of the French.

It is hard to guess what he means by the Sea-frog, unless it be some considerable Prince at Sea, which shall then be in League with the French.

IV.

French.

Le gros Mastin de Cité dechassé,
Sera fasché de l’estrange Alliance,
Apres aux Champs avoir le Cerf chassé,
Le Loup & l’Ours se donront defiance.
[195]

English.

The great Mastif being driven from the City,
Shall be angry at the strange Alliance,
After he shall have hunted the Hart in the Fields,
The Wolf, and the Bear shall defie one another.

ANNOT.

By the strange Alliance is meant that which Cromwel had with France, to the prejudice of his Majesty of England, who is here meant by the Mastif, a Creature, for which England hath been famous.

By the Wolf and the Bear are meant the French King and the Switzers, or those of Savoy.

V.

French.

Sous ombre faincte d’oster de servitude,
Peuple & Cité l’usurpera luy-mesme,
Pire sera par fraus de jeune pute,
Livré au Champ lisant le faux proësme.

English.

Under the fained shadow of freeing people from slavery,
He shall usurpe the people and City for himself;
He shall do worse by the deceit of a young Whore,
For he shall be betrayed in the field reading a false proem.

ANNOT.

The two first are plain, and may be referred to the foregoing Stanza concerning Oliver.

The last Verses are plain, and I leave them to the judicious Reader.

VI.

French.

Au Roy l’Augur sur le chef le main mettre,
Viendra prier pour la Paix Italique,
A la main gauche viendra changer le Sceptre,
De Roy viendra Empereur pacifique.

English.

The Augur shall come to put his hand upon the Kings head,
And pray for the Peace of Italy,
In the left hand he shall change the Scepter,
Of a King he shall become a peaceful Emperour.

ANNOT.

Although the Augur in Latine signifieth one that telleth events of matters by the flying voices, or sitting of Birds, yet it is taken also (as here) for a Prelat or Clergyman, who shall put his hand upon a Kings head, and pray for the peace of Italy, and shall put a Scepter in his hand, and install him Emperour, what King this should[196] be, is easie to be conjectured by the Author, being a French-man, and setting down a King without any Epithite, and this Prophecy is a confirmation of one before of the same nature.

VII.

French.

Du Triumuir seront trouvez les os,
Cherchant profond Thresor ænigmatique,
Ceux d’alentour ne seront en repos,
Ce concaver Marbre & plomb Metallique.

English.

The bones of the Triumuir shall be found out,
When they shall seek for a deep and ænigmatical Treasure,
Those there about shall not be in rest,
This concavity shall be Marble and Metallick Lead.

ANNOT.

I suppose none so ignorant in the Roman History, but knows, that there was a combination between Octavius Cæsar, Marcus Antonius, and Lepidus, to make themselves Masters of the Roman Empire, and to divide it amongst themselves, this plot being made by three, was made by the Triumuiri, the meaning then is, that when they shall go to seek for a Treasure, they shall find the bones of one of those three persons, and in that cavity that they shall have digged, they shall find Marble and Lead.

VIII.

French.

Sera laissé le feu vif, mort caché,
Dedans les Globes horrible espouventable,
De nuict a classe Cité en poudre lasché,
La Cité a feu, l’ennemy favourable.

English.

The fire shall be left burning, the dead man shall be hid,
Within the Globes terrible and fearful,
By night the Fleet shall shoot against the City,
The City shall be on fire, the enemy shall be favourable unto it.

ANNOT.

The two Verses signifie, that fire shall be hid within Globes, I suppose them to be Granado’s, or a Mine.

The two last Verses signifie, that the Fleet in the Harbour, or near it, shall set the City on fire, and that they shall come out of the Fleet to help to quench the fire, and so shall the enemy be favourable.

[197]

IX.

French.

Jusques au fond la grand Arche Maluë,
Par chef Captif l’amy anticipé,
Naistra de Dame front, face cheveluë,
Lors par astuce Duc a mort attrapé

English.

To the bottom of the great Arch Malüe,
By a Captain that is a Prisoner, the friend shall be anticipated,
One shall be born of a Lady with a hoary face and forehead,
Then by craft shall a Duke be put to death.

ANNOT.

The meaning of the first is unknown to me: I leave it to the Reader.

The sense of the last is as obvious to the meanest capacity, as the two precedent are obscure.

X.

French.

Un chef Celtique dans le conflict blessé,
Aupres de Cave, voiant, siens mort abattre,
De sang & playes & d’ennemis pressé,
Est se couru par incogneus de quattre.

English.

A General of Flanders wounded in Battle,
Near a Cellar, seeing death to overthrow his people,
Being much oppressed with blood, wounds and enemies,
Is succoured by four unknown.

ANNOT.

This needeth no further interpretation, than that it seemeth to be near its event.

XI.

French.

Mer par solaires seure passera
Ceux de Venus tiendront toute l’Afrique,
Leur Regne plus Saturne n’occupera,
Et changera la part Asiatique.

English.

By solaries she shall pass secure,
Those of Venus shall hold all Africa,
Saturn shall hold their Kingdom no longer,
And shall change the Asiatick part.
[198]

ANNOT.

This is so obscure in words and sense, that I can judge no more than that it signifies a great change in Africa and Asia, which I suppose is already come to pass by Taffaletta.

XII.

French.

Au pres du lac Leman sera conduite,
Par garse estrange Cite voulant trahir,
Avant son meurtre a Ausbourg la grand suite,
Et ceux du Rhin la viendront envahir.

English.

Near the Leman Lake shall be a Plot,
By a strange Whore to betray a City,
Before she be kill’d her great retinue will come to Ausbourg,
And those of the Rhine shall come to invade her.

ANNOT.

We have said often before, that the Leman Lake is that of Geneva. The rest is so manifest, that it needs no interpretation.

XIII.

French.

Par grand fureur le Roy Romain Belgique,
Veexer voudra par phalange Barbare,
Furent grinssant chassera gent Lybique,
Depuis Pannons jusque Hercules la bare.

English.

Through great anger the Roman Belgick King,
Shall come to vex with Barbarian Troops,
Gnashing with fury, he shall draw away the Lybian people,
From the Pannons as far as Hercules.

ANNOT.

By the Roman Belgick King, is understood Philip the second King of Spain; because he was made King in Flanders, by his father Charles V.

The second Verse signifieth the diverse Nations that his Army was composed of.

In the third, by the Lybian people are understood the Jews, which he drove away from Spain into Africa.

The Pannons are the people of Hungary, called Pannones, and the meaning that he drove them out as far as Hercules Pillar, at the mouth of the Straits, signifies the great expulsion he made of them, which were about the number of 200000.

XIV.

French.

Saturne & Mars en Leo Espagne captifue,
Par chef Lybique au conflict attrapé,
Proche de Malte, Herede Prinse vive,
Et Romain Sceptre sera par Coq frappé.
[199]

English.

Saturn and Mars being in Leo, Spain shall be captive,
By a Lybian General taken in the Battle,
Near Malta, an Heirse shall be taken alive,
And the Roman Scepter shall be strucken by the Cock.

ANNOT.

By the Cock is meant the King of France. The rest is plain.

XV.

French.

En navigant Captif prins grand pontife,
Grand apres faillir les clercs tumultuez,
Second esleu absent son bien debife,
Son favory Bastard a mort tué.

English.

In Sailing a Pope shall be taken Captive;
After which, shall be a great uproar amongst the Clergy,
A second absent elected, consumeth his goods,
His favourite Bastard shall be killed.

ANNOT.

These Verses signifie no more, but that a Pope going by water, shall be taken Prisoner, for which, all the Clergy shall be in disorder, and elect a new one, who shall consume his Goods, and shall have a favourite Bastard, that shall be killed.

XVI.

French.

A son haut prix plus la larme Sabæe,
D’humaine chair par mort en cendre mettre,
L’Isle Pharos par Croisars perturbée,
Alors qua Rhodes paroistra dur espectre.

English.

The Sabæan Tear shall be no more at its high price,
To turn humane flesh by death into ashes,
The Island Pharos shall be troubled by Croisars,
When at Rhodes shall a hard Phantasm appear.

ANNOT.

The Sabæan Tear, is Frankincense, so called; because it is the Gum of a Tree that groweth in that Countrey, whence the Poet saith,

India mittit ebur, molles sua thura Sabæi.

The meaning therefore of the two first Verses, is, that Frankincense shall be no more so dear as it hath been; because it shall be no more used, in enbalming and burning of dead bodies.

The third verse saith, the Island Pharos (which is that little Island that lyeth before the Harbour of Alexandria) shall be troubled by Croisars, that is, Christians, when there shall appear a Phantasme, or a Vision shall be seen at Rhodes.

[200]

XVII.

French.

De nuit passant le Roy pres d’une Andronne,
Celuy de Cipres & principal de guerre,
Le Roy failly la main fuit long du Rhosne,
Les conjurez liront la a mort mettre.

English.

The King going along by night near an Andronne,
He of Cyprus and chief of the War,
The King having missed the hand, runneth away along by the Rhosne,
The Conspirators shall put him to death there.

ANNOT.

I could not find what he meaneth by Andronne, therefore I believe it is a barbarous and forged word, which the Author hath foisted in, to make the first Verses rhime with the word Rhosne in the third Verse, which is a famous River in France.

XVIII.

French.

De duel mourra l’infelix profligé,
Celebrera son victrix l’Hecatombe,
Pristine loy franc edict redigé,
Le mur & Prince septiesme ira au tombe.

English.

The unhappy being overcome, shall die for grief,
His Victrix shall celebrate the Hecatomb,
The former law and free Edict shall be brought again,
The wall and seventh Prince shall go to the Grave.

ANNOT.

Victrix is a Latine word, and the Feminine Gender of victor, and signifieth a woman that is victorious; Hecatomb is a Sacrifice, wherein an hundred Oxen are killed.

XIX.

French.

Le grand Royal d’Or, d’Airain augmenté,
Rompu la pache par jeune, ouverte guerre,
Peuple affligé par un chef lamenté,
De sang barbare sera couverte Terre;

English.

The great Golden Royal, being increased with Copper,
The agreement being broken by a young man, there shall be open War,
People afflicted by the loss of a General lamented,
The ground shall be covered with barbarous blood.

[201]

ANNOT.

By the great golden Royal, is understood (if I mistake not) a King rich in Gold and Silver, who being joyned with one rich in Copper, shall make open War against one that shall have broken his agreement.

Quære: Whether this came not to pass when Gustaphus Adolphus King of Sweden and rich in Brass, being helped by the French Gold and Silver; was not the General so much lamented, after he had almost ruined the Emperour, whom he did challenge to have broken his word, and had covered the ground with German and Swedish blood.

XX.

French.

De la les Alpes grand Armée passera,
Un peu devant naistra monstre vapin,
Prodigieux, & subit tournera,
Le grand Toscan a son lieu plus propin.

English.

Beyond the Alpes shall a great Army go, and
A little before shall be born a Vapin Monster,
Prodigious and suddenly the great Toscan
Shall return to his nearest place.

ANNOT.

What the Author meaneth by vapin, is unknown to me, as for the word propin, it is a diminutive of the Latine word propinquus, by the figure of Rhetorick, called Tmesis.

XXI.

French.

Par le trespas du Monarque Latin,
Ceux quil aura par Regne secourus,
Le feu livra divisé le butin,
La mort publique aux hardis accourus.

English.

By the death of the Latine Monarque,
Those that he shall have succoured in his Reign.
The fire shall shine, the booty shall be divided,
The stout comers in shall be put to publick death.

ANNOT.

Every body may judge of this as well as I, therefore to trouble my self it should be to no purpose.

XXII.

French.

Avant qu’a Rome grand aye rendu l’Ame,
Effrayeur grande a l’Armée estrangere,
Par escadrons l’embusche pres de Parme.
Puis les deux rouges ensemble feront chere.
[202]

English.

Before that a great man yeildeth up his Soul at Rome,
The Army of strangers shall be put into a great fright,
By Squadrons the ambush shall be near Parma.
After that, the two red ones shall make good cheer together.

ANNOT.

Here is nothing difficult, but what he meaneth by the two red ones, for my part I suppose them to be two Cardinals.

XXIII.

French.

Les deux contens seront unis ensemble,
Quand la pluspart a Mars seront conjoints,
Le grand d’Affrique en effrayeur & tremble,
Duumuirat par la chassé desjoint.

English.

The two contented shall be united together,
When the most part shall be joyned to Mars,
The great one of Africa shall be in fear and terrour,
Duumuirat shall by the pursuit be disjointed.

ANNOT.

This signifieth, that two powerful Princes shall joyn together, to make War in Africa, which shall be much terrified at it, but this Duumuirat, that is, this agreement of two Princes shall be broken off, and disjoyned.

XXIV.

French.

Le Regne & Roy soubs Venus eslevé,
Saturne aura sur Jupiter Empire,
La Loy & Regne par Jupiter levé,
Par Saturnins endurera le pire.

English.

The Kingdom and King being raised under Venus,
Saturn shall have power over Jupiter,
The Law and Reign raised by Jupiter,
Shall be put to the worse by the Saturnins.

ANNOT.

I shall leave this to be expounded by those that have more skill in Astronomy then I have.

XXV.

French.

Le Prince Arabe, Mars, Sol, Venus, Lion,
Regne d’Eglise par Mer succombera,
Devers la Perse bien pres d’un Million,
Bizance, Ægypte, Ver. Serp. invadera.
[203]

English.

The Arabian Prince, Mars, Sol, Venus, Leo,
The Kingdom of the Church shall be overcome by Sea
Towards Persia very near a Million,
Byzance, Ægypt, Ver. Serp. shall invade.

ANNOT.

This is of the same nature as the foregoing, therefore I leave it to the same expositors.

XXVI.

French.

La gent esclave par un heur Martial,
Viendra en haut degré tant eslevée,
Changeront Prince, naistra un Provincial,
Passer la Mer, copie aux Monts levée.

English.

The Slavish Nation shall by a Martial luck
Be raised to so high a degree,
That they shall change their Prince, and elect one among themselves,
They shall cross the Sea with an Army raised in the Mountains.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no interpretation.

XXVII.

French.

Par feu & armes non loin de la Mar negro,
Viendra de Perse occuper Trebisonde,
Trembler Pharos, Metelin, Sol alegro,
De sang Arabe d’Adrie couvert l’Onde.

English.

By Fire and Sword not far from the black Sea,
They shall come from Persia to seize upon Trebisonde,
Pharos and Methelin shall quake, Sun be merry,
The Sea of Adria shall be covered with Arabian blood.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy foretelleth clearly and plainly, that the Persians shall come to invade the Turkish dominions, a part of which is the Empire of Trebisond, and that Pharos and Methelin two Islands in the Mediterranean Sea, shall quake for fear.

As also that the Adriatick Sea, which is that Sea that belongeth to the Venetians shall be covered with Turkish blood, at which the Author is so jocund, as with an exclamation he inviteth the Sun to be merry, and rejoyce at it.

[204]

XXVIII.

French.

Le bras pendu & la jambe liée,
Visage pasle, au sein poignard caché,
Trois qui seront jurez de la meslée,
Au grand de Genes sera le Fer lasché.

English.

The arm hanging, and the leg bound,
With a pale face, a Dagger in the bosom,
Three that shall be sworn to the fray,
To the great one of Genoa the Iron shall be darted.

ANNOT.

This manifestly foretelleth a conspiracy of three men against the Duke of Genoa, one of which three men, under the shew of a sore Arm, and an impotent Leg, shall carry a Dagger in his bosom, with which he shall stabb the said Duke.

XXIX.

French.

La liberté ne sera recouvrée,
L’Occupera noir, fier, vilain inique;
Quand la matiere du Pont sera ouvrée,
D’Hister, Venise faschée la Republique.

English.

The liberty shall not be recovered,
It shall be occupied, by a black, fierce, and wicked villain;
When the work of the Hister-Bridge shall be ended,
The Venetian Common-wealth shall be vexed.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is divided into two parts, the first of which is comprehended in the two first Verses, viz. that the liberty of some politick body (he nameth not which) shall not be recovered, but shall be seized upon, by a black, fierce, and wicked villain.

The second part is contained in the two last Verses, wherein he saith, that the Common-wealth of Venice shall be in trouble, when the Bridge made over the River Hister shall be finished.

XXX.

French.

Tout a l’entour de la grande Cité,
Seront Soldats logez par Champs & Villes,
Donner l’assaut Paris, Rome incité,
Sur le Pont sera faite grand pille.
[205]

English.

Round about the great City,
Soldiers shall lye in the Fields and Towns,
Paris shall give the Assault, Rome shall be attached;
Then upon the Bridge shall be great plundering.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the taking and sacking of Rome, by the Duke of Bourbon, General of Charles V. Forces, therefore he saith that Paris shall give the Assault, because the said Duke of Bourbon was a Frenchman.

XXXI.

French.

Par Terre Attique chef de la sapience,
Qui de present est la Rose du Monde,
Pont ruiné & sa grand preeminence,
Sera subdite & naufrage des Ondes.

English.

In the Countrey of Attica which is the head of wisdom,
And now is the Rose of the World,
A Bridge shall be ruinated with its great preeminence,
It shall be subdued, and made a wrack by the Waves.

ANNOT.

He foretelleth the destruction of a famous Bridge in the Countrey of Attica, of which Athens is the chief City, and because it was always famous for learning, he calleth it here the head of Wisdom; and that Wisdom, the Rose of the World.

XXXII.

French.

Ou tout bon est, tout bien Soleil & Lune,
Est abondant, sa ruine s’approche,
Le Ciel s’advance a changer ta fortune,
En mesme estat que la septiesme Roche.

English.

Where all well is, all good O Sun and Moon,
Is existent, his ruine draweth near,
The Heaven is making hast to change thy fortune,
Into the same case as the seventh Rock is.

ANNOT.

By this dark Stanza, the Author seemeth to foretell the woful condition of a Countrey that was happy before, but shall fall to ruine, I suspect he intended France, because being a Frenchman he did not name it, for I think there was never such a change in the world as was in that Kingdom, in the time of the Civil Wars between the Roman Catholicks, and the Protestants.

[206]

XXXIII.

French.

Des principaux de Cité rebellée,
Qui tiendront fort pour liberté r’avoir,
Detrencher masles, infœlice meslée!
Cris, hurlemens a Nantes pitieux voir.

English.

Of the chief men in a rebelled City,
Who shall stand out to recover their liberty,
The Males shall be cut in pieces, O unhappy quarrel!
Cries and houlings, it shall be pity to see at Nantes.

ANNOT.

The Author applyeth this Prophecie to the City of Nantes in Britany, but want of Books that treat of the History of that Countrey; I could neither satisfie my self, nor the Reader, if this hath come to pass already or not.

XXXIV.

French.

Du plus profond de l’occident Anglois,
Ou est le chef de l’Isle Britanique,
Entrera classe en Garonne par Blois,
Par Vin & Sel faux cachez aux barriques.

English.

From the deepest Westerly part of England,
Where the chief of the Britain Island is,
A Fleet shall come into the Garonne by Blaye,
By Wine and Salt fire shall be hidden in Barrels.

ANNOT.

There is a notable and sensible error in the French Copy, and without reforming it, the sense is not only obscure, but also impossible; for instead of Blois, which the Author hath put here, I suppose to make the rime good, it must be written Blaye, which is a Sea Town of the mouth of the River Garonne, and Blois is a mid-Land Town, upon the River Loire, about a hundred Leagues distant from the other.

The rest signifieth no more, but that there shall be some Warlike Stratagem made use of by the French (understood here by the names of Wine and Salt) in puting fire into Barrels.

XXXV.

French.

Par Cité franche de la grand Mer Seline,
Qui porte encor l’estomach la pierre,
Angloise classe viendra soubs la bruine,
Prendre un rameau de grand ouverte guerre.
[207]

English.

By a free City of the Selyne Sea,
Which carrieth yet the stone in the Stomach,
An English Fleet shall come under a fog,
To take a branch of great open War.

ANNOT.

What should the Author mean by the free City of the great Seline Sea that carryeth yet the stone in the Stomach, is hard to guess; for my part I believe it to be Venice. First, because by the Seline Sea, he always understands the Mediterranean; because the great Turks name in our Authors time was Selyn, who was Master of the greatest part of it. Secondly, there is no other free City so considerable as this. Thirdly, by the stone in the Stomach, may be understood, the Pillars that are in the Piazza of St. Mark, and as it were in the Centre of Venice, as the Stomach is in the Body. The sense therefore is this, as I take it, that a considerable Fleet shall come to Venice, or rather to Molamocco, which is the Harbour, and there take a branch of great open War, that is, to be either against the Venetians, or against the Turk in their behalf.

XXXVI.

French.

De Sœur le frere par simulte feintise,
Viendra mesler rosee en Mineral,
Sur la placente donne a vieille tardive,
Meurt le goustant, sera simple rural.

English.

The Brother of the Sister, with a fained dissimulation,
Shall mix Dew with Mineral,
In a Cake given to a slow old woman,
She dieth tasting of, the deed shall be simple, and Countrey like.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth a notable poisoning that shall be done by a Brother upon his Sister, which, because she died not fast enough, according to his mind: and therefore called her slow, he would set her forward with a poisoned Cake, the Poison was Mineral, and therefore Arsenick or Sublimate, mixed with Manna, called here Dew; because Manna is nothing but a Dew, condensed upon the Bark of a certain Tree; the Conclusion is, that the woman shall die eating of it, though the meat seemed to be simple and rural.

XXXVII.

French.

Trois sens seront d’un vouloir & accord,
Qui pour venir au bout de leur attainte,
Vingt mois apres tous eux & leurs records,
Leur Roy trahy simulant haine, feinte.
[208]

English.

Three hundred shall be of one mind and agreement,
That they may compass their ends,
twenty months after by all them and their partners,
Their King shall be betrayed, by dissembling a fained hatred.

ANNOT.

The difficulty of meeting in any Countrey three hundred men of one mind, hath perswaded me that our Author writ this for England; but by reason there hath been since a general pardon, I will keep my mind to my self.

XXXVIII.

French.

Ce grand Monarque qu’au mort succedera,
Donnera vie illicite & lubrique,
Par nonchalance a tous concedera,
Qua la parfin faudra la loy Salique.

English.

The great Monarch that shall succeed to the great one,
Shall lead a Life unlawfull, and lecherous,
By carelesness he shall give to all,
So that in Conclusion the Salique Law shall fail.

ANNOT.

This hath a Relation to the precedent Stanza, therefore, &c.

XXXIX.

French.

Du vray rameau de fleur de Lis issu,
Mis & loge heritier d’Hetrurie,
Son sang antique de longue main tissu,
Fera Florence florir en l’Armoirie.

English.

Issued out of the true branch of the City,
He shall be set for Heir of Hetruria,
His ancient blood waved by a long while,
Shall cause Florence to flourish in the Scutcheon.

ANNOT.

This is only in commendation of the Family of the Medicis, and of their Alliance with the Crown of France; for Catharine of Medicis, wife to Henry II. was Queen of France when our Author lived.

[209]

XL.

French.

Le sang Roial sera si tresmeslé,
Contraints seront Gaulois de l’Hesperie,
On attendra que terme soit coulé,
Et que memoire de la voix soit perie.

English.

The Royal blood shall be so much mixed,
The French shall be constrained by the Spaniards,
They shall stay till the term be past,
And the remembrance of the voice be over.

ANNOT.

This only signifieth a strict Union between the French and the Spaniards, by several Alliances.

XLI.

French.

Nay soubs les ombres & journée nocturne,
Séra en Regne & bonté Souveraine,
Fera renaistre son sang de l’antique Urne,
Renouvelant siecle d’Or pour l’airain.

English.

Being born in the shadows and nocturnal time,
He shall be a Soveraign in Kingdom and bounty,
He shall cause his blood to come again from the ancient Urn,
Renewing a golden Age instead of a brazen one.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth the greatness and goodness of a Prince that shall be born in the beginning of the night.

XLII.

French.

Mars eslevé en son plus haut befroy,
Fera retraire les Allobrox de France,
La gent Lombarde fera si grand effroy,
A ceux de l’Aigle comprins soubs la Balance.

English.

Mars being elevated in its higher Steeple,
Shall cause the Allobrox to retreat from France,
The people of Lombardy shall be in so great fear,
Of those of the Eagle comprehended under Libra.

ANNOT.

The Allobrox are the people of Savoy. Those of the Eagle comprehended under Libra, are the subjects of the Empire that use the French tongue.

[210]

XLIII.

French.

Le grand ruine des Sacrez ne sesloigne,
Provence, Naples, Sicile, Seez & Ponce,
En Germanie au Rhin & la Coloigne,
Vexez a mort par tous ceux de Mogunce.

English.

The great ruine of the sacred things is not far off,
Provence, Naples, Sicily, Sez and Ponce,
In Germany towards the Rhyne and Colen,
They shall be vexed to death by those of Moguntia.

ANNOT.

He foretelleth the troubles that were to be shortly in those Countreys for Religion.

XLIV.

French.

Par Mer le rouge sera prins the Pyrates,
La paix sera par son moyen troublée,
L’une & l’auare commettra par faincte acte,
Au grand Pontife fera l’Armée d’oublée.

English.

By Sea the red one shall be taken by Pyrates,
The peace by that means shall be troubled,
He shall commit anger and coveteousness by a feigned action,
The High Priest shall have a double Army.

ANNOT.

By the red one is understood some Cardinal that shall be taken by Pyrates, for which the peace shall be in danger to be broken, the same Cardinal shall by a feigned action be guilty of choler and covetousness, and for his recovery and the defending the Rites of the Church, the Pope shall have a double Army granted to him.

XLV.

French.

Le grand Empire fera tost desolé,
Et translate pres d’Arduenne silve,
Les deux batards par l’aisné decollé,
Et Regnera Ænodarbnez de milve.

English.

The great Empire shall soon be made desolate,
And shall be translated near the Forrest of Arden,
The two Bastards shall have their heads cut off by the eldest son,
And he that shall reign, shall be Ænodarbnez nosed.

[211]

ANNOT.

By the great Empire is meant that of Germany, which he says shall be translated near the Forrest of Ardens, which is near the borders of France. Two Bastards shall be beheaded by command of the elder Brother of the House, and he that shall Reign shall have a reddish beard, and a Hawks nose.

XLVI.

French.

Par Chapeaux rouges querelles & nouveaux schismes,
Quand on aura esleu le Sabinois,
On produira contre luy grands sophismes,
Et sera Rome lessée par Albanois.

English.

By red Hats, quarrels and new schismes,
When the Sabin shall be Elected,
Great sophismes shall be produced against him,
And Rome shall be endamaged by the Albanois.

ANNOT.

By red Hats are understood Cardinals of Rome, who shall raise great quarrels and schismes, when a Pope of the Countrey of the Sabins (which is near Rome) shall be Elected, against whom many things shall be objected, and that Rome shall be endamaged by the Albanians, which are a Warlike people, and for the most part subject to the Common-wealth of Venice.

XLVII.

French.

Le grand Arabe marchera bien avant,
Trahy sora par le Bisantinois:
L’Antique Rhodes luy viendra au devant,
Et plus grand mal par Austre Pannonois.

English.

The great Arabian shall proceed a great way,
He shall be betrayed by the Bisantines,
The ancient Rhodes shall come to meet him,
And a greater evil by a South wind from Hungary.

ANNOT.

By Bisantine is understood the great Turk, Master of Constantinople, formerly called Bysantium.

XLVIII.

French.

Apres la grande affliction du Sceptre,
Deux ennemis par eux seront defaicts:
Classes d’Affrique aux Pannons viendra naistre,
Par Mer & Terre seront horribles Faicts.
[212]

English.

After the great afflictions of the Scepter,
Two enemies shall be overcome by themselves,
A Fleet of Affrica shall be born to the Hungarians.
By Sea and Land shall be horrid facts.

ANNOT.

The words of this Stanza are plain, though the sense be something obscure.

XLIX.

French.

Nul de l’Espagne, mais de l’antique France,
Sera esleu pour le tremblant nacelle,
A l’ennemy sera faicte fiance,
Qui dans son Regne sera peste cruelle.

English.

None out of Spain, but of the ancient France,
Shall be Elected to govern the tottering Ship.
The enemy shall be trusted,
Who to his Kingdom shall be a cruel plague.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses foretell a schisme in the Church of Rome, understood by a tottering Ship, and that a French-man shall be Elected Pope to remedy it.

The two last Verses are easie to be understood.

L.

French.

L’An que les Freres du Lys seront an Aage,
L’Un d’euz tiendra la grand Romanie:
Trembler les Monts ouvert Latin passage,
Bache marcher contre Fort d’Armenie.

English.

In the year that the Brethren of the Lillies shall be at Age,
One of them shall hold the great Romanie:
The Mountains shall tremble, the Latine passage shall be opened,
A Bassha shall march against the Fort of Armenia.

ANNOT.

By the Brethren of the Lillies are meant the Heirs of the Crown of France; the rest is plain.

[213]

LI.

French.

La gent de Dace, d’Angleterre, & Polone,
Et de Boësme feront nouvelle ligue,
Pour passer outre d’Hercules la Colonne,
Barcins, Thyrrans dresser cruelle brigue.

English.

The people of Dacia, England, and Poland,
And of Bohemia shall make a new League,
To go beyond Hercules Pillars,
Barcins and Thyrrens shall make a cruel plot.

ANNOT.

By Barcins he means those of Carthage, which is now Tunis, and by the Thyrrens, those that live near that Sea.

LII.

French.

Un Roy sera qui donra l’opposite,
Les exilez eslevez sur le Regne,
De sang nager la gent caste hyppolite,
Et florira long-temps sous telle enseigne.

English.

A King shall be, who shall be opponent
To the banished persons raised upon the Kingdom,
The chast Hippolite Nation shall swim in blood,
And shall flourish a great while under such an Ensign.

ANNOT.

Here is Demorritus’s Well where the truth may be, but I cannot find it.

LIII.

French.

La Loy du Sol, & Venus contendans,
Appropriant l’Esprit de Prephetie:
Ne l’un ne l’autre ne seront entendus,
Par Sol tiendra la Loy du grand Messie.

English.

The Law of the Sun and Venus contending,
Appropriating the spirit of Prophecy,
Neither one nor the other shall be heard,
By Sol the Law of the great Messias shall subsist.

ANNOT.

This is of the same obscurity with the foregoing one.

[214]

LIV.

French.

Du pont Euxine, & la grand Tartarie,
Un Roy sera qui viendra voir la Gaule,
Transpercera Alane & l’Armenie,
Et dans Bisance Lairra sanglante Gaule.

English.

From the Euxin Sea, and great Tartaria,
A King shall come to see France,
He shall go through Alanea and Armenia,
And shall leave a bloody rod in Constantinople.

ANNOT.

This is so plain, that it needeth no interpretation.

LV.

French.

De la felice Arabie contrade,
Maistra puissant de la loy Mahometique,
Vexer l’Espagne, conquestre la Grenade,
Et plus par Mera la gent Ligustique.

English.

Out of the Countrey of Arabia the happy,
Shall be born a powerful man of the Mahometan Law,
Who shall vex Spain and conquer Grenada,
And by Sea shall come to the Ligurian Nation.

ANNOT.

The Ligurian Nation are those of Genoa.

LVI.

French.

Par le traspas du tres-vieillard Pontife,
Sera esleu Romain de bon aage,
Qui sera dit que le siege debiffe,
Et long tiendra & de picquant courage.

English.

By the death of the very old high-Priest,
Shall be a Roman elected of good age,
Of whom it shall be said, that he dishonoureth the Seat,
And shall live long, and be of a fierce courage.

ANNOT.

The sense and the words are plain.

[215]

LVII.

French.

Istra du Mont Gaulsier & Aventine,
Qui par le trou advertira l’Armée,
Entre deux Rocs sera prins le butin,
De Sext. Mansol faillir la renommée.

English.

One shall go out of the Mountains Gaulsier and Aventine,
Who through a hole shall give notice to the Army,
Between two Rocks the booty shall be taken,
Of Sext. Mansol shall loose his renown.

ANNOT.

The Mountains of Gaulsier and Aventine are two of the seven Mountains of Rome, out of which, it seems, one shall go out to give notice to the Army without, and the Booty of the Pope, called Sextus, shall be taken.

But what he meaneth by Mansol, I am ignorant.

LVIII.

French.

De l’Aqueduct d’Uticense, Gardoing,
Par le Forest & Mont inaccessible,
Emmy du pont sera taché ou poing,
La chef Nemans qui tant sera terrible.

English.

From the Conduit of Uticense and Gardoing,
Through the Forrest and unaccessible Mountain,
In the middle of the Bridge shall be tyed by the Wrist,
The chief Nemans, that shall be so terrible.

ANNOT.

By the Conduit of Gardoing, he means that of the River Gardon, that passeth by Nismes, where there is a famous Conduit.

But what he meaneth by the chief Nemans, I cannot find.

LIX.

French.

Au chef Anglois a Nismes trop sejour,
Devers l’Espagne au secours Ænobarbe,
Plusieurs mouront par Mars ouvert ce jour,
Quand en Artois faillir estoile en Barbe.
[216]

English.

The chief English shall stay too long at Nismes,
A red haird man shall go to the succours of Spain,
Many shall die by open War that day,
When in Artois the Star shall fail in the Beard.

ANNOT.

All the difficulty lyeth in the last Verse: for my part I believe he meaneth by it a bearded Comet, such as the Latines call Cometa barbatus.

LX.

French.

Par teste rase viendra bien mal eslire,
Plus que sa charge ne porte passera,
Si grand fureur & rage fera dire,
Qua feu & sang tout Sexe tranchera.

English.

By a shaven head shall be made an ill choice,
That shall go beyond his commission,
He shall proceed with so great fury and rage,
That he shall put both Sexes to fire and Sword.

ANNOT.

By a shaven head must be understood a Priest of the Romish Religion; because they all have their heads shaven.

LXI.

French.

L’Enfant du grand nestant a sa naissance,
Subjugera les hauts Monts Apennins,
Fera trembler tous ceux de la balance,
Depuis Monts Feurs jusques a Mont Senis.

English.

The Child of the great man that was not at his birth,
Shall subdue the high Apennine Mountains,
Shall make all those under Libra to quake,
From Mount Feurs, as far as Mount Senis.

ANNOT.

The Apennine Mountains, are those that divide Italy in two parts.

Those under the Sign of Libra are the people of France. Feurs is a City in France, in the Province of Forrest. Mount Senis is a high Mountain in Savoy.

[217]

LXII.

French.

Sur les Rochers sang on verra pleuvoir,
Sol Orient, Saturne Occidental,
Pres d’Orgon Guerre, a Rome grand mal voir,
Nefs parfondrées, & prins le Tridental.

English.

It shall rain blood upon the Rocks,
The Sun being in the East, and Saturn in the West,
War shall be near Orgon, and great evil at Rome,
Ships shall be cast away, and the Trident be taken.

ANNOT.

I could not find what he meaneth by Orgon. As by the Trident being taken, I suppose he meaneth a Ship called Neptune, because Neptune is always painted with a Trident.

LXIII.

French.

De vaine emprise l’honneur indue plainte,
Galliots errants par Latins froid, faim vagues,
Non loin du Tybre de sang la Terre teinte,
Et sur humains seront diverses plagues.

English.

Honour bringeth a complaint against a vain undertaking,
Galleys shall wander through the Latin Seas, cold, hunger, Waves,
Not far from Tyber the Earth shall be died with blood,
And upon Mankind shall be several plagues.

ANNOT.

Tyber is the River of Rome, the rest are several prodigies that shall come to pass.

LXIV.

French.

Les assembles par repos du grand nombre,
Par Terre & Mer conseil contremandé,
Pres de l’Autonne, Genes, Nue, de lombre,
Par Champs & Villes le Chef contrebandé.

English.

The gathered by the rest of the great numbers,
By Land and Sea shall recall their Councel,
Near Autonne, Genes, and Nue of the shadow,
In Fields and Towns the Chief shall be one against another.

ANNOT.

This passeth my understanding.

[218]

LXV.

French.

Subit venu l’effrayeur sera grande,
Des principaux de l’affaire cachés:
Et Dame Embraise plus ne sera en veuë,
Et peu a peu seront le grands fachés.

English.

One coming upon a suddain shall cause a great fear,
To the Chief men that were hidden and concerned in the business,
And the Lady Ambraise shall be seen no more,
And by little and little the great one shall be angry.

ANNOT.

What he meaneth by the lady Ambraise, I cannot find, the rest is easie.

LXVI.

French.

Sous les antiques edifices Vestaux,
Non esloignez d’Aqueduct ruiné,
De Sol & Lune sont les luissans metaux,
Ardente Lampe Trajan d’or buriné.

English.

Under the ancient edifices of the Vestals,
Not far from an Aqueduct ruinated,
Are the bright mettals of Sun and Moon,
A burning Lamp of Trajan of ingraven gold.

ANNOT.

Monsieur Catel in his second Book of Languedoc Chap. V. saith, that there was a famous Aqueduct, which the Romans builded from the River Gar to the Town of Nismes, which at present is ruinated.

Secondly, Near the Town there was a famous Temple dedicated to Diana, where there is a Spring of water so great, that it seemeth rather a Lake then a Fountain.

Thirdly, I find that the Emperour Adrian caused a Temple to be built in the honour of Plotina Trajan’s wife.

Fourthly, He relateth that Jean Poldo found in the Town of Aix a Marble with this inscription: Plotina Trajanis uxor, summa honestate & integritate fulgens, sterilitatis defectu sine prole fecit conjugem, qui ejus opera Adrianum adoptatum in Imperio Successorem habuit, a quo in beneficii memoriam Nemausi æde sacra maximo Sumptu, sublimique structura, ac Hymnorum cantu decorata, post mortem donata est: That is to say, Plotina, Trajans wife, famous for her honesty and integrity, was barren and left no Children to her Husband, which she perceiving, intreated the Emperour to adopt Adrian for his Son, and to make him his Successor in the Empire, which being come to pass, the new Emperour in acknowledgement of such a benefit, did build her a Temple of a magnificent Structure, and caused it to be Consecrated with Musick after her death.

Fifthly, The said Author saith, that this Marble was taken out of that Temple, when the River of Gardon did so overflow, as we have said.

[219]

By all this we see, that there was a Temple of Vestals at Nismes, Diana the Maid being their chief Patroness, which is made now a Nunnery, called la Fontaine. There is also to be seen the Temple of Plotina, Trajans wife, built by Adrian his Successor. And as it was the manner of the Ancients to put some of those inextinguishable Lamps in their Graves; it is very likely, there was one of them in this Temple, and because it should be known whose Grave it was, he caused Trajans name to be Engraven in the foot of the said Lamp.

Let us explain now the Stanza: Under the Ancient Vestal buildings of the Temple of Diana, not far from the ruined Aqueduct, which carrieth the water from the River Gar to Nismes, shall be found shining mettals of Sol and Luna, that is, Meddals of gold and silver, with a burning Lamp of gold, wherein the name of Trajan was Engraven. Histories make mention of several burning Lamps in this manner, that have been found still burning in the ground, and not consumed, though they had been there above 500 years; certainly the Oil of it must have been incombustible, and could be extracted out of nothing but gold, quia nil dat quod non habet.

LXVII.

French.

Quand Chef Perouse n’osera sa Tunique,
Sens au convert tout nud s’expolier:
Seront prins sept faict Aristocratique,
Le Pere & Fils morts par poine te au collier.

English.

When the Chief of Perouse shall not dare without a Tunick,
To expose himself naked in the dark,
Seven shall be taken for setting up Aristocracy,
The Father and the Son shall die by pricks in the Collar.

ANNOT.

Perouse is a City in Italy; the rest is plain.

LXVIII.

French.

Dans le Danube & le Rhine viendra boire,
Le grand Chameau, ne sen repentira:
Trembler le Rhosne & plus fort ceux de Loire,
Et pres des Alpes Coq le ruinera.

English.

In Danubius and the Rhine shall come to drink,
The great Camel, and shall not repent;
The Rhosne shall tremble, and more those of Loire,
And near the Alpes the Cock shall ruine him.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth a great incursion of the Turks into Germany, insomuch that they shall water their Camels in the Rivers of Danubius, and of the Rhyne, to the great terrour of France, wherein those Rivers of Rhosne and Loire are.

But the last Verse, saith the Cock; that is, the French, shall overcome and ruine the Turks, near the Mountains of the Alpes.

[220]

LXIX.

French.

Plus ne sera le grand en saux sommeil,
L’Inquietude viendra prendre repos,
Dresser Phalange d’Or, Azur, & vermeil,
Subjuguer Affrique & ronger jusqu’aux os.

English.

The great one shall be no more in a false sleep,
The restlessness shall take rest,
He shall raise an Army of Gold and Azure,
He shall conquer Affrica and gnaw it to the bones.

ANNOT.

This is concerning some great Prince, who shall raise a powerful Army, and conquer Affrica with it.

LXX.

French.

Les Regions subietes a la Balance,
Feront trembler les Monts par grande Guerre,
Captifs tout sexe, avec toute Bizance,
Qu’on criera a l’Aube Terre a Terre.

English.

The Regions under the sign of Libra,
Shall make the Mountains quake with great War,
Slaves of all sexes, with all Bizance,
So that in the dawning of the day, they shall cry to Land to Land.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth the destruction of Constantinople, anciently called Byzantium, by those that live under the Sign of Libra, that is, the Europeans, and chiefly the French.

LXXI.

French.

Par la fureur d’un qui attendra l’eau,
Par la grand rage tout l’exercite esmeu,
Charge des Nobles a dixsept Bateaux,
Au long du Rhosne tard Messager venud.

English.

By the fury of one staying for the Water,
By his great rage the whole Army shall be troubled,
There shall be seventeen Boats full of Noblemen
Along the Rhosne, the Messenger shall come too late.

[221]

ANNOT.

The words and sense are plain.

LXXII.

French.

Pour le plaisir d’Edict voluptueux,
On meslera la poison dans la Loy,
Venus sera en cours si vertueux,
Qu’obfusquera du Soleil tout alloy.

English.

By the pleasure of a voluptuous proclamation,
The poison shall be mixed in the Law,
Venus shall be in so great request,
That it shall darken all the allay of the Sun.

ANNOT.

By a Proclamation, favouring or promoting Licentiousness, poison shall be mixed in the Law, and leachery so much countenanced, as it shall obscurate the allay of the Sun, that is, piety so much commended in the Gospel, to all those that will fight under Christs Banner.

LXXIII.

French.

Persecutée sera de dien l’Eglise,
Et les Saints Temples seront expoliez,
L’Enfant la mere mettra nud en chemise,
Seront Arabes au Polous ralliez.

English.

The Church of God shall be persecuted,
And the holy Temples shall be spoiled,
The Child shall turn out his Mother in her Smock,
Arrabians shall agree with the Polonians.

ANNOT.

The Author could not be mistaken in this Prophecie; for the Church of God shall always be persecuted, the Apostle confirmeth it, when he saith, that all those that will live piously in Christ, must suffer persecution: As for the spoiling of Churches, and other barbarous actions, it hath been seen so often in France, in the time of the Civil Wars for Religion, that it needeth no confirmation.

The last Verse concerning a peace between the Turks and the Polonians, was fulfilled in the year 1623. when Sigismundus King of Poland, by his Embassador the Duke Šbarasky, and by the mediation of the English Embassador, concluded a Peace with the great Turk Mustapha, the Articles of which you may read at large in the Turkish History.

[222]

LXXIV.

French.

De sang Trojen naistra cœur Germanique,
Qui deviendra en si haute puissance,
Hors chassera gent estrange Arabique,
Tournant l’Eglise en pristine préeminence.

English.

Of Trojan blood shall be born a German heart,
Who shall attain to so high a power,
That he shall drive away the strange Arrabian Nation,
Restoring the Church to her former splendor.

ANNOT.

It seemeth to signifie, that by Alliance made between a German Emperour, and a Daughter of France, which derive their Pedigree from the Trojans, a Prince shall be born of so stout and valiant a heart, as shall drive away all the Turkish power out of Germany, and shall restore the Church to her former splendor.

LXXV.

French.

Montera haut sur le bien plus a dextre,
Demourra assis sur la pierre carrée,
Vers le midy posé a la senestre,
Baston tortu en main, bouche ferrée.

English.

He shall go up upon the good more on the right hand,
He shall stay sitting upon the square stone,
Towards the South; being set, on the left hand,
A crooked stick in his hand, and his mouth shut.

ANNOT.

I do acknowledge my Ignorance in this.

LXXVI.

French.

En lieu libere tendra son Pavillon,
Et ne voudra en Citez prendre place,
Aix, Carpentras, Lisle, Volce, Mont Cavaillon,
Par tous ces lieux abolira sa trace.

English.

He shall pitch his Tent in the open air,
Refusing to lodge in the City,
Aix, Carpentras, Lisle, Volce, Mont Cavaillon,
In all those places, he shall abolish his trace.

[223]

ANNOT.

Aix, Carpentras, Lisle Volce, Mont Cavaillon, are Cities of Provence.

LXXVII.

French.

Tous les degres d’honneur Ecclesiastique,
Seront changez en Dial Quirinal,
En Martial, quirinal, Flaminique,
Puis un Roy de France le rendra Vulcanal.

English.

All the degrees of Ecclesiastical honour,
Shall be changed into a Dial Quirinal,
Into Martial, Quirinal, Flaminick;
After that, a King of France shall make it Vulcanal.

ANNOT.

All what I can say upon this, is, that Dialis in Latine is a Priest of Jupiter, and Quirinal is a Priest of Romulus, Martial Flamen is a Priest of Mars, Vulcanal is a Priest of Vulcan, let the ingenious Reader make of all these the best construction he can.

LXXVIII.

French.

Les deux unis ne tiendront longuement,
Et dans treize ans au Barbare Satrape,
Aux deux costez feront tel perdement,
Qu’un benira la Barque & sa cappe.

English.

The two united shall not hold long,
Within thirteen years to the Barbarian Satrape,
They shall cause such loss on both sides,
That one shall bless the Boat and its covering.

ANNOT.

The word Satrape is a Persian word, signifying one of the Grandees at Court. By the last Verse is meant, one that shall save his life and make his escape, by the means of a covered Boat or Barge.

LXXIX.

French.

La sacree Pompe viendra baisser les aisles,
Par la venue de grand Legislateur,
Humble haussera, vexera les rebelles,
Naistra sur Terre aucun Æmulateur.
[224]

English.

The sacred Pomp shall bow down her wings,
At the coming of the great Lawgiver,
He shall raise the humble and vex the rebellious,
No Emulator of his shall be born.

ANNOT.

This seemeth to have a relation to the birth of Christ, or Christmas-day.

LXXX.

French.

L’Ogmion grande Bizance approchera,
Chassée sera la Barbarique ligue,
Des deux Loix l’une unique lachera,
Barbare & France en perpetuelle brigue.

English.

The Ogmion shall come near great Bizance,
And shall expel the Barbarian League,
Of the two Laws, the wicked one shall yeild,
The Barbarian, and the French shall be in perpetual jar.

ANNOT.

By the word Ogmion, every where in his Book, the Author meaneth the King of France, who according to his words shall come near Constantinople, and shall break the Barbarian League, and of the two Laws, that is, the Christian and the Mahometan, the Mahometan shall yield to the other.

LXXXI.

French.

L’Oyseau Royal sur la Cité solaire,
Sept mois devant fera nocturne augure:
Mur d’Orient cherra Tonnerre esclaire,
Sept jours aux Portes les ennemies a l’heure.

English.

The Royal Bird upon the solar City,
Seven Months together shall make a nocturn augury,
The Eastern Wall shall fall, the Lightning shall shine,
Then the enemies shall be at the Gate for seven days.

ANNOT.

By the Royal Bird is meant an Eagle, which for seven days together shall be observed upon some Eastern City, and shall be taken for a presage, that the Eastern Wall of that City shall fall by Lightning, at which time the enemies shall be at the Gate for seven days together.

[225]

LXXXII.

French.

Au conclud pache hors de la Forteresse,
Ne sortira celuy en desespoir mis:
Quand ceux d’Arbois, de Langres, contre Bresse,
Auront mis Dolle bouscade d’ennemis.

English.

Upon the agreement made, out of the Fort,
Shall not come he that was in despair,
When those of Arbois, of Langres, against Bresse,
Shall have put in Dolle an Ambuscado of foes.

ANNOT.

The sense is, that according to the Articles or agreement made between the Besieger of a Fort, and the Governour of it, the said Governour by despair will not come out, and this shall happen, when those of Arbois and Langres, shall be against those of Bressia, and shall have put an Ambuscado in the City of Dolle.

LXXXIII.

French.

Ceux qui auront entreprins subvertir,
Nompareil Regne, puissant & invincible,
Feront par fraude, nuicts trois advertir,
Quand le plus grand a Table lira Bible.

English.

Those that shall have undertaken to subvert
The Kingdom that hath no equal in power and victories,
Shall cause by fraud, notice to be given for three nights together,
When the greatest shall be reading a Bible at the Table.

ANNOT.

What place is meant by the unparalell’d Kingdom, the Author hath hid as well from me as the Reader.

LXXXIV.

French.

Naistre du Gouphre & Cité immesurée,
Nay de parens obscurs & tenebreux:
Qui la puissance du grand Roy reverée,
Voudra destruire par Rouen & Eureux.

English.

One shall be born out of the Gulf and the unmeasurable City,
Born of Parents obscure and dark,
Who by the means of Rouen and Eureux,
Will go about to destroy the power of the great King.

[226]

ANNOT.

Without doubt by this Gulf and unmeasured City the Author means Paris, by reason of its greatness, and the multitude of its Inhabitants.

LXXXV.

French.

Par les Sueves & lieux circonvoisins,
Seront en guerre pour cause des nuées:
Gammares, locustes & cousins,
Du Leman fautes seront bien desnuées.

English.

Through Swedeland and the Neighbouring places,
By reason of the Clouds shall fall to War,
The Lobstars, Grass-hoppers and Gnats,
The faults of Leman shall appear very naked.

ANNOT.

By Leman is meant the City of Geneva, the rest needeth no further interpretation.

LXXXVI.

French.

Par les deux testes, & trois bras separez,
La grand Cité sera par eaux vexée;
Des Grands d’entre eux par esgarez,
Par teste Perse Byzance fort pressée.

English.

Divided in two heads and parted into three arms,
The great City shall be troubled with Waters,
Some great ones among them scattered by banishment,
By a Persian head Byzance shall be sore oppressed.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy containeth three things, the first is an Inundation by which Paris is threatened, for without doubt he meaneth here that City, at the head of which the River Seine is divided in two heads, and makes an Island where the Cathedral Church and the Palace are situated, and then parted into three branches, one of which runneth by the Church of the Augustines, the other by the Quay of la Megisserie, and the third passeth under the great Hospital; this City then is threatned here of an Inundation, to which it is very subject, by reason of the lowness of her situation, and the confluence of several Rivers that meet at the head of it. The second part of the Prophecy hinteth that at that time, some great ones of that City shall be banished; and the third, that Constantinople, which was anciently called Byzantium; or rather the great Turk by a figure of Rhetorick, called Synecdoche, shall be much oppressed by the Persians.

[227]

LXXXVII.

French.

L’An que Saturne hors de servage,
Au franc terroir sera d’eau inondé,
De sang Troien sera son mariage,
Et sera seur d’Espagnols circondé.

English.

In the year that Saturn out of slavery,
In the free Countrey shall be drowned by water,
With Troian blood his marriage shall be,
And for certain he shall be hedged about with Spaniards.

ANNOT.

By Troian blood is understood the French Nation, the meaning therefore is, that in the year that a great Inundation shall be in France, then shall a notable marriage be made, by which the French shall be hedged about, or fenced by Spaniards.

LXXXVIII.

French.

Sur le Sablon par un hideux Deluge,
Des autres Mers trouvé Monstre Marin,
Proche de lieu sera fait un refuge,
Tenant Savone esclave de Turin.

English.

Upon the sand through an hideous Deluge
Of other Seas, shall be found a Sea Monster,
Near to that place shall be made a Sanctuary,
Which shall make Savone a slave to Turin.

ANNOT.

When by the overflowing of the Neighbouring Seas, a Sea Monster shall be cast upon the Sand, near to that Place shall be built a Fort, that shall make Savona a slave to Turin.

Savona is a Town by the Sea side, belonging to the Genoese, Turin is the chief City of Piemont, belonging to the Duke of Savoy.

LXXXIX.

French.

Dedans Hongrie par Boheme, Navarre,
Et par Banieres feintes seditious,
Par fleurs de Lis paix portant la barre,
Contre Orleans fera esmotions.
[228]

English.

In Hungaria, through Bohemia and Navarre,
And by banners fained seditions,
Through flower de Luce the Countrey that wears the Bar,
Against Orleans shall make commotions.

ANNOT.

This Stanza is divided into two parts; the two first Verses foretell the troubles that were to happen in Hungaria, Bohemia, and Navarre for Religion sake. The two last ones were fulfilled, when the Prince of Condé, who in his Arms wears the flower de Luce with the Bar, did seize upon Orleans for the Protestant party.

XC.

French.

Dans les Cyclades, en Corinthe, & Larisse,
Dedans Sparte tout le Peloponese,
Si grand famine peste far faux conisse,
Neuf mois tiendra & tout le Cherronesse.

English.

In the Cyclades, in Corinthe, and Larisse,
In Sparta, and all Peloponesus,
There shall be so great a famine and plague by false arts,
That shall last nine months in Chersonesus.

ANNOT.

Cyclades are the Islands in the Ægean Sea; Corinth, Larissa, Sparta, Peloponesus, and Chersonesus, are Countreys of Grecia.

XCI.

French.

Au grand marché qu’on dit des mensongers,
De tout Torrent & Champ Athenien,
Seront surpris par les Chevaux legers,
Des Albanois, Mars, Leo, Sat. au Versien.

English.

In the great Market called of the Liars,
Which is all Torrent and Athenian Field,
They shall be surprised by the light Horse,
Of the Albanese, Mars in Leo, Saturn in Aquarius.

ANNOT.

When Mars shall be in the sign of Leo, and Saturn in that of Aquarius, then the Countrey of Athens shall be over-run by light Horsemen of Albania.

[229]

XCII.

French.

Apres le siege tenu dixsept ans
Cinq changeront en tel revolu terme,
Puis sera l’un esleu de mesme temps,
Qui des Romains ne sera trop conforme.

English.

After the seat possessed seventeen years,
Five shall change in such a space of time;
After that, one shall be elected at the same time,
Who shall not be very conformable to the Romans.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that when a Pope shall have sat in the Chair, for the space of 17 years, within the same space of 17 years, five others shall be elected; and after them another, that shall not be well approved of by the Roman Clergy, and Nobility. If my memory doth not fail me, this is come to pass already; but wanting the Popes Chronology, I could not make it good.

XCIII.

French.

Soubs le terroir du rond Globe Lunaire,
Lors que sera dominateur Mercure,
L’Isle d’Escosse fera un Lumenaire,
Que les Anglois mettra a desconfiture.

English.

Under the Territory of the round Lunary Globe,
When Mercury shall be Lord of the ascendant;
The Island of Scotland shall make a Luminary,
That shall put the English to an overthrow.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie must of necessity be past; for since the union of both Kingdom under one King, such a thing hath not happened, nor is it likely it should be hereafter.

XCIV.

French.

Translatera en la grand Germanie,
Brabant & Flanders, Gand, Bruges & Bologne,
La trefue fainte le grand Duc d’Armenie,
Assailera Vienne & la Coloigne.
[230]

English.

He shall translate into the great Germany,
Brabant, Flanders, Gand, Bruges, and Bullen,
The truce fained, the great Duke of Armenia,
Shall assault Vienna and Colen.

ANNOT.

It is concerning an Emperour that shall add all those Countreys to the Empire of Germany.

XCV.

French.

Nautique rame invitera les umbres,
Du grand Empire lors viendra conciter,
La mer Ægee des lignes des Encombres,
Empeschant londe Tirrhene de fletter.

English.

The Sea Oare shall invite the shades,
Of the great Empire, then shall it come to stir,
The Ægean Sea, with lines of Encumbers,
Hindering the Tirrhene Sea to roll.

ANNOT.

This is either Mistical or Metaphorical, or I understand it not.

XCVI.

French.

Sur le milieu du grand monde la Rose,
Pour nouveaux faits sang public espandu,
A dire uray on aura bouche close,
Lors au besoing viendra tard lattendu.

English.

The Rose shall be in the middle of the great world,
Blood shall be publickly spilt for new deeds;
To say the truth, every one shall stop his mouth,
Then at the time of need shall come long looked for.

ANNOT.

The words are plain, out of which every one may make what construction he pleaseth.

XCVII.

French.

Le na difforme par horreur suffoqué,
Dans la Cité du grand Roy habitable,
L’edit severy des captifs revoqué,
Gresle & Tonnerre, Condon inestimable.
[231]

English.

The deformed born shall through horror be suffocated,
In the habitable City of the great King,
The severe Proclamation against banished shall be recalled,
Hail and Thunder shall do inestimable harm at Condon.

ANNOT.

Condon is a Town in France; the rest is plain.

XCVIII.

French.

A quarante huit degré Climacterique,
A fin de Cancer si grande secheresse,
Poisson en Mer, Fleuve, Lac cuit hectique,
Bearn, Bigorre, par feu Ciel en detresse.

English.

At the Climacterical degree of eight and fourty,
At the end of Cancer, shall be such a drougth,
That Fish in the Sea, River, and Lake shall be boiled to a consumption,
Bearn and Bigorre by Heavenly fire shall be in distress.

ANNOT.

Bearn and Bigorre are two Provinces of France; the rest is plain.

XCIX.

French.

Milan, Ferrare, Turin & Aquilee,
Capne, Brundis vexez par gent Celtique,
Par le Lion & Phalange Aquilee,
Quand Rome aura le chef vieux Britannique.

English.

Milan, Ferrara, Turin, and Aquileia,
Capne, Brundis, shall be vexed by the French,
By the Lion and troop of Aquileia,
When Rome shall have an old Brittanick Head.

ANNOT.

The Cities here mentioned are all in Italy.

C.

French.

Le boutefeu par son feu attrapé,
Du feu du Ciel a Tartas & Comminge,
Foix, Aux, Mazere, haut vieillard escapé,
Par ceux de Hess, de Saxe & de Turinge.
[232]

English.

The incendiary shall be overtaken by his own fire,
Heavenly fire shall fall at Tartas and Cominge,
Foix, Auch, Mazerre, a tall old man shall escape,
By the means of those of Hessia, Saxony, and Turinge.

ANNOT.

Tartas, Cominge, Foix, Auch, Mazere are Towns in France. Hessia, Saxony, and Turinge are Provinces of Germany.


[233]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY VI.

I.

French.

Autour des Monts Pyrenees grand amas,
De gent estrange secourir Roy nouveau,
Pres de Garonne du grand Temple du Mas,
Un Romain Chef le craindra dedans l’Eau.

English.

About the Pyrenean Mountains there shall be a great gathering
Of strange Nations to succour a new King;
Near Garonne and the great Temple of Mas,
A Roman Captain shall fear him in the Water.

ANNOT.

The Pyrenean Mountains are those that part Spain from France; Garonne is the River that runneth at Bourdeaux, it seemeth then, that upon that River a Roman Captain shall stand in much fear of the new King before mentioned.

[234]

II.

French.

En la cinq cens octante plus & moins,
On attendra le siecle bien estrange,
En l’an sept cens & trois (cieux en tesmoins),
Regnes plusieurs un a cinq feront change.

English.

In the year five hundred fourscore more or less,
There shall be a strange Age,
In the year seven hundred and three (witness Heaven),
Many Kingdoms, one to five shall be changed.

ANNOT.

What strange age it was in the year 1580. every one may satisfie himself by History. As for the year 1703. our Author saith there will be great wonders, chiefly there shall many changes be in Kingdoms, insomuch, that one shall be divided into five.

III.

French.

Fleuve qu’esproune le nouveau nay Celtique,
Sera en grande de l’Empire discorde:
Le jeune Prince par gent Ecclesiastique,
Le Sceptre osté Corone de concorde.

English.

The River that makes tryal of the new born Celtick,
Shall be at great variance with the Empire,
The young Prince shall be an Ecclesiastical person,
And have his Scepter taken off, and the Crown of concord.

ANNOT.

This River is the River of Rhyne, because the ancient French when they had a King newly born, they used to put him upon a Target, to make him swim upon that River, to try whether by his swimming he was lawfully begotten or no; the meaning therefore is, that this new born Celtique or French King shall be at variance with the Empire, and that in his young years the Clergy shall take his Scepter and Crown from him.

IV.

French.

Fleuve Celtique changera de Rivage,
Plus ne tiendra la Cité d’Agripine,
Tout transmué horsmis le viel Language,
Saturn, Leo, Mars, Cancer en rapine.
[235]

English.

The River of the Low-Countreys shall change her Shoare,
It shall touch no more the City of Agrippina,
All shall be transformed, except the old Language,
Saturn, Leo, Mars, Cancer in Rapine.

ANNOT.

This is a strange prediction, if it should prove true, that the Rhine should change its course, and should touch no more the City of Colen, which is here called Agrippina; because its name in Latine is Colonia Agrippina, being a Colony of the Romans, built by M. Agrippa, son in Law to Augustus; others say by Agrippina, Mother to the Emperour Nero.

The last Verse signifieth no more than an unfortunate position and Aspect of the two Planets, Saturn and Mars, and of the two Signs, Leo and Cancer.

V.

French.

Si grand famine par une pestifere,
Par pluye longue le long du Pole Artique.
Samarobryn cent lieux de l’Hemisphere,
Vivront sans loy exempt de politique.

English.

So great a famine with a plague,
Through a long Rain shall come along the Artick Pole,
Samarobryn a hundred Leagues from the Hemisphere,
Shall live without Law, exempt from pollicy.

ANNOT.

The two last Verses foretel a great Plague and Famine that shall come from the North, by the means of the long Rain.

Samarobryn he calls a people, that shall be a hundred Leagues from our Hemisphere, and shall live without Law and Policy.

VI.

French.

Apparoistra vers le septentrion,
Non loing de Cancer l’estoille cheveluë,
Suze, Sienne, Boëce, Eretrion,
Mourra de Rome grand, la nuict disperuë.

English.

Towards the North shall appear,
Not far from Cancer a blazing Star,
Suza, Sienna, Boëce, Eretrion,
There shall die at Rome a great man, the night being past.

[236]

ANNOT.

Here he foretelleth the apparition of a Commet that shall be vertical to the Cities here named, and not far from the Sign of Cancer, at which time a great person shall die at Rome, about the dawning of the day.

VII.

French.

Norvege & Dace, & l’Isle Britannique,
Par les unes freres seront vexées,
Le chef Romain issu du sang Gallique,
Et les copies aux forests repousées.

English.

Norvegia, and Dacia, and the Brittish Island,
Shall be vexed by the Brothers united.
The Roman Captain issued from French blood,
His Forces shall be beaten back to the Forrest.

ANNOT.

The difficulty lyes in the word Brothers, which I suppose to be the United Provinces. The rest is plain.

VIII.

French.

Ceux qui estoient en regne pour scavoir,
Au Royal change deviendront a pauvris,
Uns exilez sans appuy, Or navoir,
Lettréz & lettres ne seront a grand pris.

English.

Those that were in esteem for their learning,
Upon the change of a King shall become poor,
Some banished, without help, having no Gold,
Learned and learning shall not be much valued.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is clear enough, and here the Author hath said nothing, but what doth commonly happen.

IX.

French.

Aux Temples Saints seront faits grands scandales,
Comptez seront peur honneurs & louanges,
D’un que l’on grave d’Argent, d’Or les Medals,
La fin sera en tourmens bien estranges.
[237]

English.

To the holy Temples shall be done great scandals,
That shall be accounted for honours and praises,
By one, whose medals are graven in Gold and Silver,
The end of it shall be in very strange torments.

ANNOT.

Here the Reader must understand that the Author was a Roman Catholick, and therefore calleth Holy Temples, the Churches of the Romish Religion, which in the beginning of the Civil Wars in France, were much abased by those of the Protestant Religion, then called Huguenots, whose chief was Henry King of Navarre, who was the only man amongst the Protestant party, that could have Money and Medals coined to his stamp, as being King of Navarre. But the last Verse of this Prophecie proved too true, when upon St. Bartholomews day, the 24 of August, in the year 1572. the general Massacre of the Protestants was made through France.

X.

French.

Un peu du temps les Temples des Couleurs,
De blanc & noir des deux entremislée,
Rouges & jaunes leur embleront les leurs,
Sang, terre, peste, faim, feu, eau affollée.

English.

Within a little while the Temples of the Colours,
White and Black shall be intermixt,
Red and Yellow shall take away their Colours,
Blood, earth, plague, famine, fire, water shall destroy them.

ANNOT.

By the Temples of the Colours White and Black, I suppose he means that of Peace, and of War; by the Red and Yellow, may be meant the Empire of the Sweads, who shall be at variance together; and by their long War shall bring the Plagues here mentioned, as it came to pass in the Wars of Germany, between the Emperour and Gustavus Adolphus, King of the Sweads.

XI.

French.

Les sept rameaux a trois seront reduits,
Les plus aisnez seront surprins par morts,
Fratricider les deux seront seduits,
Les Conjures en dormant seront morts.

English.

The seven branches shall be reduced to three,
The eldest shall be surprised by death,
Two shall be said to kill their Brothers,
The Conspirators shall be killed, being asleep.

[238]

ANNOT.

It is apparent, that he speaks of seven Brethren, that shall be reduced to three, whereof the eldest son shall be surprised by death, and two of the rest shall be said to have murdered their Brother, the Conspirators shall afterwards be killed in their sleep.

XII.

French.

Dresser Copie pour monter a l’Empire,
Du Vatican le sang Royal tiendra,
Flamens, Anglois, Espagne aspire,
Contre l’Italie & France contendra.

English.

To raise an Army, for to ascend unto the Empire,
Of the Vatican, the Royal blood shall endeavour,
Flemings, English, Spain shall aspire,
And shall contend against Italy and France.

ANNOT.

This prediction signifies no more, but that there shall be a great commotion among the Nations, of Europe, concerning the election of a Pope, which is called here the Empire of the Vatican; because the Vatican is the Popes Palace in Rome.

XIII.

French.

Un dubieux ne viendra loing du regne,
La plus grand part le voudra soustenir,
Un Capitole ne voudra point quil regne,
Sa grande Chaire ne pourra maintenir.

English.

A doubtful man shall not come far from the Reign,
The greatest part will uphold him,
A Capitol will not consent that he should Reign,
His great Chair he shall not be able to maintain.

ANNOT.

What should that doubtful man be, whom our Author doth mention here, is not easie to be understood; but it seemeth that it shall be some body pretending to the Popedom, who shall have a great party for himself, and yet for all that shall be excluded, and not able to keep his Seat; so that this Prophecie is but the second part of the foregoing; for they have both a relation together. The Capitol anciently was the Citadel of Rome, and now is the place where the Courts of Judicature meet, called Campidoglio.

[239]

XIV.

French.

Loing de sa Terre Roy perdra la Bataille,
Prompt, eschapé poursuivy, suivant pris,
Ignare pris soubs la dorée maille,
Soubs feint habit, & l’Ennemy surpris.

English.

Far from his Countrey the King shall loose a Battle,
Nimble, escaped, followed, following, taken,
Ignorantly taken under the gilded Coat of Mail,
Under a feigned habit the enemy taken.

ANNOT.

This Prophecy was fulfilled in the year 1578. when Don Sebastian King of Portugal, went into Affrica, to help and succour Muley Hamet, against Muley Maluc, that had expelled him out of the Kingdom of Fez and Morocco, and there fought that famous Battle of Alcasserquibir, wherein his whole Army was routed, and himself slain by the Moores, and his body afterwards sold to the King of Spain for a 100000. Crowns.

XV.

French.

Dessous la Tombe sera trouvé le Prince,
Qu’aura le pris par dessus Nuremberg:
L’Espagnol Roy en Capricorne mince,
Feinct & trahy par le grand Vutitemberg.

English.

Under the Tomb shall be found the Prince,
That shall have a price above Nuremberg,
That Spanish King in Capricorn shall be thine,
Deceived and betrayed by the great Vutitemberg.

ANNOT.

We hear of no Prince that had that advantage upon Nuremberg, but only Gustavus Adolphus King of Sweden, who took it. The last two Verses signifie no more, then that the King of Spain shall be wasted at the time when the Sun is in Capricorn.

XVI.

French.

Ce que ravy sera du jeune Milve,
Par les Normans de France & Picardy,
Les noirs du Temple du lieu de Negrisilve,
Feront aux Berge & feu de Lombardie.
[240]

English.

That which shall be taken from the young Kite,
By the Normans of France and Picardie,
The black ones of the Temple of the place called black Forrest.
Shall make a Rendezvouz, and a fire in Lombardie.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that what the Normans and those of Picardie shall save from the hand of a young conquering Prince, the same shall be imployed in building a Temple in the black Forrest, which is that part of the Forrest of Arden, that lies near Bohemia, and another part of it to build a House in Lombardie.

XVII.

French.

Apres les livres bruslez les Asiniers,
Contraints seront changer d’habits divers:
Les Saturnins bruslez par les meusniers,
Hors la pluspart qui ne sera convers.

English.

After the Books shall be burnt, the Asses,
Shall be compelled several times to change their Cloaths,
The Saturnins shall be burnt by the Millers,
Except the greater part, that shall not be discovered.

ANNOT.

This seems to foretell a persecution of ignorant men against the learned, after which shall happen a confusion amongst the ignorant persons, who shall be forced to disguise themselves.

The last two Verses seem to be of the same sense, for by the Saturnins I understand studious people, and by the Millers rude and unlearned persons.

XVIII.

French.

Par les Physiques le grand Roy delaissé,
Par sort non art de l’Ebrieu est en vie,
Luy & son Genre au Regne hault pousé,
Grace donnée a gent qui Christ envie.

English.

The great King being forsaken by Physicians,
Shall be kept alive by the Magick and not by the art of a Jew,
He, and his kindred shall be set at the top of the Kingdom,
Grace shall be given to a Nation that envieth Christ.

ANNOT.

This in plain words signifieth no more, but that a King shall be desparately sick and forsaken by his Physicians, and shall recover by the help of a Jew, for which fact those of that Nation shall be reestablished in his Countrey.

[241]

XIX.

French.

La vraye flamme engloutira la Dame,
Que voudra mettre les Innocens a feu,
Pres de l’aussaut l’exercite s’enflamme,
Quand dans Seville monstre en Bœuf sera veu.

English.

The true flame shall swallow up the Lady,
That went about to burn the guiltless,
Before the Assault the Army shall be incouraged,
When in Seville, a Monster like an Ox shall be seen.

ANNOT.

Seville is the chiefest City of Andalusia a Province in Spain; the rest is plain.

XXI.

French.

L’Union feinte sera peu de durée,
Les uns changes reformez la plus part:
Dans les Vaisseaux sera gent endurée,
Lors aura Rome un nouveau Leopart.

English.

The feigned union shall not last long,
Some shall be changed, others for the most part reformed,
In the Ships people shall be pen’d up,
Then shall Rome have a new Leopard.

ANNOT.

When the things contained in the three first Verses shall come to pass, then Rome shall have a new Pope, expressed here by the word Leopard from the variousness, that is, in his Pontifical Garments.

XXI.

French.

Quand ceux du Pole Artique unis ensemble,
En Orient grand effrayeur & crainte,
Esleu nouveau soustenu le grand tremble,
Rodes, Bisance de sang Barbare taincte.

English.

When those of the Artick Pole shall be united together,
There shall be in the East a great fear and trembling,
One shall be newly Elected, that shall bear the brunt,
Rodes, Bisance, shall be dy’d with Barbarian blood.

[242]

ANNOT.

This foretelleth an union between the Europeans, or Nations of the North against the Eastern people, or Turks, and that the Christians shall make choice of such a General, that shall make the East quake, and get such Victories, whereby Rhodes and Constantinople shall be dyed with Turkish blood.

XXII.

French.

Dedans la Terre du grand Temple Celique,
Neveu a Londres par paix feinte meurtry,
La Barque alors deviendra Schismatique,
Liberté feinte sera au corne & cry.

English.

Within the ground of the great Cœlestial Temple,
A Nephew at London by a fained peace shall be murdered,
The Boat at that time shall become Schismatical,
A fained liberty shall be with Hue and Cry.

ANNOT.

I think that by the great Cœlestial Temple, he meaneth that of St. Paul, in which, or in the ground about it, shall be murdered a Nephew by his Uncle, which shall cause great divisions and dissensions in the City, compared here to a Boat, and that a dissembled or fained liberty shall be proclaimed.

XXIII.

French.

Despit de Roy, numismes descriez,
Peuples seront esmeus contre leur Roy,
Paix fait nouveau, Saintes Loix empirées,
Rapis onc fut en si piteux arroy.

English.

The despight of a King, and Coin being brought lower
People shall rise against their King,
Peace newly made, Holy Laws being made worse,
Rapis was never in such a great disorder.

ANNOT.

The first thing here to be observed, is the word Rapis, which is the Anagramme of Paris, which he saith was never in such a trouble before, as it shall be when the people shall rebel against the King for hatred, and because he shall have put low the price and intrinsical value of Coin and Money; he foretelleth also that there shall be a new Peace made, and that the Holy Laws shall be much impaired.

XXIV.

French.

Mars & le Sceptre se trouvera conjoint,
Dessoubs Cancer calamiteuse guerre,
Un peu apres sera nouveau Roy oingt.
Qui par long temps pacifiera la Terre.
[243]

English.

Mars and the Scepter, being conjoyned together,
Under Cancer shall be a calamitous War,
A little while after a new King shall be anointed,
Who for a long time shall pacifie the Earth.

ANNOT.

The meaning of this is, that when the Planet of Mars shall be in conjunction with the constellation he calleth here the Scepter, that then shall be a very calamitous War. The two last Verses are plain enough of themselves.

XXV.

French.

Par Mars contraire sera la Monarchie,
Du grand Pescheur en trouble ruineux,
Jeune, noir, rouge prendra la Hierarchie,
Les proditeurs iront jour bruineux.

English.

By Mars contrary shall the Monarchy
Of the great Fisherman, be brought into ruinous trouble,
A young, black, red shall possess himself of the Hierarchy,
The Traitors shall undertake it on a misty day.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is concerning a certain Pope, signified here by the word of great Fisherman; because in his Seal is graven a Fisherman, and therefore in all his Bulls and Expeditions, it is always written, Datum Romæ sub sigillo piscatoris: this Pope then it seemeth, shall be brought to ruine, and another it seemeth shall succeed him, having here three Epithetes, viz. Young, Black, and Red, which signifieth, that against the common election of Popes, he shall be elected young, and shall be Black in his complexion, and Red in Cloaths, viz. a Cardinal. Hierarchy is a Greek word, signifying Dominion over the Church. The last Verse needeth no explication, being plain enough of it self.

XXVI.

French.

Quattre ans le siege quelque peu bien tiendra,
Un surviendra libidineux de vie,
Ravenna, & Pise, Verone soustiendront,
Pour eslever la Croix de Pape envie.

English.

Four years he shall keep the Papal seat pretty well,
Then shall succeed one of a libidinous life,
Ravenna, Pisa, shall take Verona’s part,
To raise up the Popes Cross to Life.

[244]

ANNOT.

This Prediction seemeth to have not only a relation to the foregoing, but also a connexion; for the Author still handleth the matter of the Popedome, and saith, that after that Pope shall have Reigned four years, there shall succeed one that shall be notorious for debauchedness and lechery, and that those Towns he mentioneth here (which are all in Italy) shall take the Popes part.

XXVII.

French.

Dedans les Isles de cinq fleuves a un,
Par le croissant du grand Chyren Selin,
Par les bruynes de l’air fureur de l’un,
Six eschapez, chachez fardeaux de lin.

English.

In the Islands from five Rivers to one,
By the increase of great Chyren Selin,
By the Frost of the Air one shall under furious,
Six shall escape, hidden within bundles of Flax.

ANNOT.

Chyren by transposition is taken for Henry, and Selin for a King called so; because it is the name of a Turkish Emperour: So that by this Stanza I suppose he means Henry II. his Master, King of France. The rest is plain.

XXVIII.

French.

Le grand Celtique entrera dedans Rome,
Menant amas d’exilez & bannis,
Le grand Pasteur mettra a mort tout homme,
Qui pour le Coq estoient aux Alpes unis.

English.

The great Celtique shall enter into Rome,
Leading with him a great number of banished men,
The great Shepheard shall put to death every man,
That was united for the Cock near the Alpes.

ANNOT.

Because this word Celtique is often repeated in this Book, it would not be amiss to satisfie the Reader of the meaning of it; it is properly the Nation of the Flemings, and some others of the Low-Countreys as far as the Mase and the Rhyne, which anciently were called Galli Celtæ. By the great Shepheard, is meant the Pope, and by the Cock is meant the French Nation. The rest is easie.

XXIX.

French.

La Veufve Sainte entendant les nouvelles,
De ses rameaux mis en perplex & trouble,
Qui sera duit appaiser les querelles,
Par son pourchas des Razes sera comble.
[245]

English.

The holy Widow hearing the News
Of her Branches put in perplexity or trouble,
That shall be skilfull in appeasing of quarrels,
By his purchase shall make a heap of shaven heads.

ANNOT.

By the holy Widow, is meant the City of Rome, which is called in Italian, Roma la santa, because of the blood of so many Martyrs that hath been shed there, for the maintenance of the Christian Religion, he calleth it a Widow; because at that time there will be no Pope elected, and there shall be a kind of interregnum, as it always happens when a Pope is dead, until the new one be elected. What he calleth here Branches, are the Clergy men, and the shaven heads the Priests.

XXX.

French.

Par l’apparence de feinte Saincteté,
Sera trahy aux ennemis le siege,
Nuit qu’on croioid dormir en seureté,
Pres de Brabant marcheront ceux de Liege.

English.

By the appearance of a feigned holiness,
The siege shall be betrayed to the enemies,
In a night that every one thought to be secure,
Near Brabant shall march those of Liege.

ANNOT.

Brabant is one of the seventeen Provinces, and Liege is a great City upon the River of Maze. The rest is not difficult.

XXXI.

French.

Roy trouvera ce quil desiroit tant,
Quand le Prelat sera repris a tort,
Response au Duc le rendra mal content,
Qui dans Milan mettra plusieurs a mort.

English.

A King shall find what he so much longed for,
When a Prelate shall be censured wrongfully,
An answer to the Duke will make him discontented,
Who in Milan shall put many to death.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is too indefinite, to admit of a particular sense; for there be so many Prelates, so many Kings, so many Dukes, that it is not easie to fix upon any particular one, and therefore we must leave this Stanza in Democritus’s Well.

[246]

XXXII.

French.

Par trahison de verges a mort battu,
Puis surmonté sera par son desordre,
Conseil frivole au grand captif sentu,
Nez par fureur quand Berich viendra mordre.

English.

By Treason one shall be beaten with rods to death,
Then the Traitor shall be overcome by his disorder,
The great Prisoner shall try a frivilous Counsel,
When Berich shall bite anothers nose through anger.

ANNOT.

The words are so plain, that every one may make his own interpretation of them.

XXXIII.

French.

Sa main derniere par Alus sanguinaire,
Ne le pourra par la Mer garentir,
Entre deux fleuves craindra main militaire,
Le noir l’Ireux le fera repentir.

English.

His last hand bloody through Alus,
Shall not save him by Sea,
Between two Rivers he shall fear the military hand,
The black and Cholerick one shall make him repent.

ANNOT.

This seemeth to be concerning a bloody man, that had killed one Alus, and sought to save himself by Sea; but was taken between two Rivers, and put to death by the command of one that was a black and Cholerick man.

XXXIV.

French.

De feu volant la machination,
Viendra troubler le Chef des Assiegez,
Dedans sera telle sedition,
Qu’en desespoir seront les profligez.

English.

The device of flying fire
Shall trouble so much the Captain of the Besieged,
And within shall be such mutiny,
That the Besieged shall be in despair.

ANNOT.

It is a Fort or Town besieged by an Enemy, who shall torment the besieged so much with Bombs and Granadoes, and other flying fire, that they shall despair to escape.

[247]

XXXV.

French.

Pres de Rion & proche Blanchelaine,
Aries, Taurus, Cancer, Leo, La Vierge,
Mars, Jupiter, le Sol ardra grand plaine,
Bois & Citez, Lettres cachez au Cierge.

English.

Near Rion going to Blanchelaine,
Aries, Taurus, Cancer, Leo, Virgo,
Mars, Jupiter, Sol shall burn a great Plain,
Woods and Cities, Letters hidden in a wax Candle.

ANNOT.

The meaning of it is, that when by the virtues and meetings of the said Constellations, a great plain shall be burnt by Rion (which is a City in Auvergne) that then Letters shall be found hidden in a wax Candle.

XXXVI.

French.

Ne bien ne mal par bataille terrestre,
Ne parviendra au confins de perouse,
Rebeller pise, Florence voir mal estre,
Roy nuit blessé sur mulet a noire house.

English.

Neither good nor evil by a Land-fight,
Shall reach to the Borders of Perusa,
Pisa shall rebel, Florence shall be in an ill case,
A King being upon his Mule shall be wounded in the night time.

ANNOT.

Perusa, Pisa, and Florence are Cities in Italy; the rest is plain.

XXXVII.

French.

L’œuvre ancienne se parachevera,
Du toit cherra sur le grand mal ruine,
Innocent fait, mort on accusera,
Nocent caché taillis a bruine.

English.

The ancient work shall be finished,
From the tiling shall fall upon the great one an evil ruine,
The innocent declared to be so, shall be accused after his death,
The guilty shall be hidden in a wood in a misty weather.

[248]

ANNOT.

By the first Verse is understood an ancient building, which shall be finished and brought to perfection, I suppose it to be the Louvere, which hath been a building in the Reign of seven Kings. But before it be throughly finished, some ruine shall fall upon a great man and kill him; one declared innocent of the fact shall be accused of it after his death, and he that shall be guilty of it shall escape by hiding himself in a Wood in misty weather.

XXXVIII.

French.

Aux profligez de Paix les ennemis,
Apres avoir l’Italie superée,
Noir sanguinaire, rouge sera commis,
Feu, sang verser, eau de sang colorée.

English.

To the vanquished the enemies of peace,
After they shall have overcome Italy,
A bloody black one shall be committed,
Fire and blood shall be powerd, and water coloured with blood.

ANNOT.

A bloody black man shall be put into the hands of the vanquished, by those that were enemies to peace, after they have conquered Italy, whence shall proceed fire and blood, and water coloured with blood.

XXXIX.

French.

L’Enfant du Regne par Paternelle prinse,
Expolier sera pour delivrer,
Aupres du Lac Trasym en la Tour prinse,
La troupe hostage pour trop fort s’enyvrer.

English.

The Child of the Kingdom, through his Fathers imprisonement,
Shall be deprived of his Kingdom for the delivering of his father,
Near the Lake Trasymene shall be taken in a Tower,
The troop that was in Hostage, being drunk.

ANNOT.

The Lake Trasymene in Italy, is that near which Annibal got that famous Battle upon the Romans. The rest is as plain as the words can bear.

XL.

French.

Grand de Mogonce pour grande soif esteindre,
Sera privé de sa grand dignité,
Ceux de Cologne si fort le viendront plaindre,
Que le grand Groppe au Rhin sera jetté.
[249]

English.

The great one of Ments for to quench a great thirst,
Shall be deprived of his high dignity,
Those of Colen shall bemoan him so much.
That the great Groppe shall be thrown into the Rhine.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth the fall of an Archbishop of Ments, in Latine Moguntia, who is the first Ecclesiastical Elector, and shall be deprived of his dignity by a covetous and powerful Prince to satisfie his covetousness, at which those of Colen his neighbours shall be so incensed, that they shall throw that covetous person into the Rhine.

XLI.

French.

Les second Chef du Regne Dannemark,
Par ceux de Frize & l’Isle Britannique,
Fera despendre plus de cent mille mark,
Vain exploiter voiage en Italique.

English.

The second head of the Kingdom of Dannemark,
By those of Friezeland, and the Brittish Island,
Shall cause to be spent above 100000. Mark,
Vainly endeavouring a journey into Italy.

ANNOT.

This signifieth onely a conjunction of the Dutch, Danish, and English Forces, to attempt something in Italy, which shall prove fruitless, and cost a great deal of Money.

XLII.

French.

A l’Ogmion sera laissé le Regne,
Du grand Selin, qui plus fera de fait,
Par l’Italie estendra son enseigne,
Regira par prudent contrefait.

English.

Unto l’Ogmion shall be left the Kingdom,
Of great Selyn, who shall do more then the rest,
Through Italy he shall spread his Ensigns,
He shall govern by a prudent dissimulation.

ANNOT.

We have said before, that when ever the Author speaks of Ognion, he meaneth the King of France, the meaning therefore of this whole Stanza is, that Henry the II. Son to Francis the I. whom he calls here great Selin, shall do more in Italy then his Predecessors had done, which proved true, and he governed his Kingdom with a prudent dissimulation.

[250]

XLIII.

French.

Long temps sera sans estre habitée,
Ou Siene & Marne autour vient arrouser,
De la Thamise & Martiaux tentée,
Deceus les gardes en evidant repousser.

English.

A great while shall be unhabited,
Where Seine, and Marne comes to water about,
Being attempted by the Thames and Martial people,
The Guards deceived in thinking to resist.

ANNOT.

By the two first Verses, he meaneth without doubt the City of Paris, for it is watered by those two Rivers the Seine and Marne, that joyn together at the head of it, but how this City should become unhabited is the great question, and chiefly by the means here alledged, viz. of the English signified by the Thames, and other Martial people, the Guards deceived in thinking to repulse the enemy.

XLIV.

French.

De nuict par Nantes l’Iris apparoistra,
Des Arcs Marins susciteront la pluye:
Arabique Goulfre grand classe parfondra,
Un Monstre en Saxe naistre d’Ours & Truye.

English.

By night in Nantes the Rain-bow shall appear,
Sea Rain-bows shall cause Rain;
The Arabian Gulf shall drownd a great Fleet,
A Monster shall be in Saxony from a Bear and a Sow.

ANNOT.

Nantes is a City in France, Iris is the Rainbow, Saxony is a Province in Germany; the rest is plain.

XLV.

French.

Le Governeur du Regne bien scavent,
Ne consentir voulant au faict Royal:
Medite classe par le contraire vent,
Le remettra a son plus desloyal.

English.

The Governour of the Kingdom being learned,
Shall not consent to the Kings will:
He shall intend to set out a Fleet by a contrary Wind,
Which he shall put into the hands of the most disloyal.

[251]

ANNOT.

This signifies that the Governour or Vice-Roy of a Kingdom shall refuse to consent to his Kings Deeds; the rest needeth no interpretation.

XLVI.

French.

Unjuste sera en exil Anvoyé,
Par pestilance aux confins de non seggle,
Response au rouge le fera desvoye,
Roy retirant a la Rane & a l’Aigle.

English.

A just person shall be banished,
By plague to the Borders of Non seggle,
The answer to the red one shall make him deviate,
Retiring himself to the Frog and the Eagle.

ANNOT.

I cannot find what he meaneth by Non-seggle; by the Eagle he meaneth the Emperour, and by the Frog the King of France, for before he took the Flower de Luce, the French bore three Frogs.

XLVII.

French.

Entre deux Monts les deux grands Assemblez,
De laisseront leur simulte secrete,
Bruxelle & Dolle par Langres accablez,
Pour a Maline executer leur peste.

English.

Between two Mountains the two great ones shall meet,
They shall forsake their secret enmity,
Brusselle and Dolle shall be crushed by Langres,
To put their plague in Execution at Maline.

ANNOT.

Brussel is a Town of Brabant, and so is Maline; Dolle is one of Burgundy; and Langres another of France.

XLVIII.

French.

La saincteté trop faincte & seductive,
Accompagne d’une langue diserte,
La Cité vieille, & Parme trop nastive,
Florence & Sienne rendront plus desertes.
[252]

English.

The fained and seducing holiness,
Accompanied with a fluent tongue,
Shall cause the old City, and too hasty Parma,
Florence and Sienna to be more desert.

ANNOT.

I know not what he means by the old City, unless it be Rome, by reason of its antiquity.

XLIX.

French.

De la partie de Mammer grand Pontife,
Subjuguera les confins du Danube,
Chasser les croix, par fer raffe ne riffe,
Captifs, Or, bagues, plus de cent mille Rubles.

English.

From the party of Mammer high Priest,
They shall subdue the borders of Danubius,
They shall expel crosses, by Sword topse-turvy,
Slaves, Gold, Jewels, more than 100000. Rubles.

ANNOT.

Some parties of the Popes side, shall subdue those bordering upon Danubius, and drive away the Priests, turn all things topse-turvy, make slaves, and take a booty above the value of 100000. Rubles. A Ruble is a piece of Gold of the great Mogul, worth two or three pound sterling.

L.

French.

Dedans le puis seront trouvez les os,
Se l’inceste commis par la Marastre,
L’estat changé, en fera bruit des os,
Et aura Mars ascendant pour son astre.

English.

In the Well shall be found the bones,
Incest shall be committed by the Stepmother,
The case being altered, there shall be great stir about the bones,
And she shall have Mars for her ascending Planet.

ANNOT.

It is the strange wickedness of a woman, that shall incestuously be got with Child by her Son in Law, and when she is delivered, shall kill her Child, and throw him into a Well; a while after the water beginning to corrupt, a search shall be made of the cause, and then the Childs Bones shall be found, which shall cause a great stir, and for to know this wicked woman, he saith, that the Planet of Mars shall be the ascendant in her Horoscope.

[253]

LI.

French.

Peuple assemble voir nouveau spectacle,
Princes & Roys par plusieurs assistans,
Piliers faillir, murs, mais comme miracle,
Le Roy fauve & trente des instans.

English.

People assembled to see a new show,
Princes and Kings, with many assistants,
Pillars shall fail, walls also, but as a miracle,
The King saved, and thirty of the standers by.

ANNOT.

The words of this prediction are plain and easie, and signifie no more than what often happeneth, and may happen yet, viz. that where a concourse of people shall be to see a new show, the Pillars and walls of the Building shall fall, and people perish by the ruine, (as if it were by a Miracle) the King and thirty of the spectators shall be preserved.

LII.

French.

En lieu du grand qui sera condamné,
De prison hors, son amy en sa place,
L’espoir Troyen en six mois joinct, mort né,
Le Sol a l’Vurne seront prins fleuves en glace.

English.

Instead of the great one that shall be condemned
And put out of Prison, his friend being in his place,
The Trojan hope in six months joyn, still born,
The Sun in Aquarius, then Rivers shall be frozen.

ANNOT.

By the Trojan hope, is meant a King of France, who after he hath been marryed six Months, shall have a Child still born.

LIII.

French.

Le grand Prelat Celtique a Roy suspect,
De nuict par cours sortira hors du Regne,
Par Duc fertile a son grand Roy Bretagne,
Bisance a Cypres, & Tunis insuspect.

English.

The great Celtique Prelate suspected by his King,
Shall in hast by night go out of the Kingdom
By the means of a Duke the fruitful Britanie,
Bisance by Cyprus, and Tunis shall be unsuspected.

[254]

ANNOT.

The great Celtique Prelate, was the Cardinal of Lorrain, Brother to the Duke of Guizse, who being suspected by the King, went away by night to Rome.

By fruitfull Brittain, is understood the province of that name in France, which by the means of the Duke of Mercure, her Governour shall be unsuspected by the King.

LIV.

French.

Au point du jours au second chant du Coq,
Ceux de Tunes, de Fez, & de Bugie,
Par les Arabes captif le Roy Maroq,
L’an mil six cens & sept, de Liturgie.

English.

At the break of day, at the second crowing of the Cock,
Those of Tunis, and Fez, and Bugia,
By means of the Arabians, shall take Prisoner the King of Morocco,
In the year 1607. by Liturgie.

ANNOT.

By Liturgie, I suppose he meaneth under pretext of Religion. The rest is easie to be understood.

LV.

French.

Au Chelme Duc, en arrachant l’esponce,
Voile Arabesque voir, subit descouverte:
Tripolis, Chio, & ceux de Trapesonce,
Duc prins, Marnegro, & la Cité deserte.

English.

The Chelme Duke, in pulling a spunge,
Shall see Arabian Sails suddenly discovered:
Tripolis, Chios, and those of Trapesan,
The Duke shall be taken, Marnegro and the City shall be desert.

ANNOT.

Chelme is a German word, that signifies a Rogue. By Marnegro, is meant the Black Sea, or Nigropont. By pulling a Spunge, I suppose the great quantity of Spunges that stick to the Rocks in that Sea.

Tripolis, Chios, and Trapezon, are places in the Turkish Dominions.

LVI.

French.

La crainte Armée de l’ennemy Narbon,
Effroyera si fort les Hesperiques,
Parpignan vuide par l’aveugle d’Arbon,
Lors Barcelon par Mer donra les piques.
[255]

English.

The feared Army of the enemy Narbon,
Shall so much terrifie the Spaniards,
That Parpignan shall be left empty by the blind d’Arbon,
Then Barcelon by Sea shall give the Chase.

ANNOT.

A great Army gathered about Narbon, shall so much terrifie the Spaniards, that Parpignan a Town of theirs shall be desolate, and left empty by the Governour, here called the blind d’Arbon, then Barcelon, which is a Sea-Town in Catalonio, belonging to the Spaniards shall come to its succours, and chase the enemy by Sea.

LVII.

French.

Celuy qu’estoit bien avant dans le Regne,
Ayant Chef rouge proche a la Hierarchie,
Aspre & cruel, & se fera tant craindre,
Succedera a sacrée Monarchie.

English.

He that was a great way in the Kingdom,
Having a red head and near the Hierarchy,
Harsh and cruel, shall make himself so dreadful,
That he shall succeed to the Sacred Monarchy.

ANNOT.

This is a person of great quality, and near of blood to a King, who being a Cardinal, cruel and dreadful, shall be Elected Pope, I suppose Clement the VII.

LVIII.

French.

Entre les deux Monarques esloignez,
Lors que le Sol par Selin clair perdue:
Simulté grande entre deux indignez,
Qu’aux Isles & Sienne la liberté renduë.

English.

Between the two Monarchs that live far one from the other,
When the Sun shall be Ecclipsed by Selene,
Great enmity shall be between them two,
So that liberty shall be restored to the Isles and Sienne.

ANNOT.

Here is nothing difficult but the word Selene, which is the Moon from the Greek σεληνη.

The meaning is, that at such a time when the Sun is Ecclipsed by the Moon, Sienna and the Islands about it shall be at liberty.

[256]

LIX.

French.

Dame en fureur par rage d’adultere,
Viendra a son Prince conjurer non dire,
Mais bref cogneu sera le vitupere,
Que seront mis dixsept a Martyre.

English.

A Lady in fury by rage of an Adultery,
Shall come to her Prince and conjure him to say nothing,
But shortly shall the shameful thing be known,
So that seventeen shall be put to death.

ANNOT.

The sense of this Stanza and the words are plain.

LX.

French.

Le Prince hors de son Terroir Celtique,
Sera trahy, deceu par interprete,
Rouen, Rochelle, par ceux de l’Armorique,
Au Port de Blavet deceux par Moin & Prestre.

English.

That Prince being out of his Celtick Countrey,
Shall be betrayed and deceived by an Interpreter,
Rouen, Rochel, by those of Gascony,
At the Port of Blavet shall be deceived by Monk and Priest.

ANNOT.

We have said many times before, what is meant by the word Celtique. The Port of Blavet is that of the River of Bordeaux.

LXI.

French.

Le grand Tapis plié ne monstrera,
Fors qu’a demy la pluspart de l’Histoire,
Chassé du Regne aspre loin paroistra,
Au fait Bellique chacun le viendra croire.

English.

The great Carpet folded shall not shew,
But by half the greatest part of the History,
The driven out of the Kingdom shall appear sharp afar off,
In Warlike matters every one shall believe him.

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

[257]

LXII.

French.

Trop tard tous deux les fleurs seront perdües,
Contre lay loy Serpent ne voudra faire,
Des ligueurs forces par gallops confondues,
Savone, Albingue, par Monech grand martyre.

English.

Both the flowers shall be lost too late,
Against the Law the Serpent will do nothing,
The forces of the Leaguers by gallops shall be confounded,
Savone, Albingue, by Monech shall suffer great pain.

ANNOT.

The two first verses are too mistical for me; the third signifieth, that by gallops; that is, by Troops of Horses, the Leaguers, viz. those that held the party of the League, shall be routed by the Kings Cavalry. The fourth, that Savone and Albingue, two Towns of the Genoeses, shall be put to much trouble by those of Monech and Monaco, another Town near them, belonging to the Prince of Monaco, a Genoese of the house of Grimald.

LXIII.

French.

La Dame seule au Regne demurée,
L’unique esteint premier au lict d’honneur,
Sept ans sera de douleur epleurée,
Puis longue vie au regne par bonheur.

English.

The Lady shall be left to reign alone,
The only one being extinguished, first in the Bed of Honour,
Seven years she shall weep for grief,
After that she shall live long in the Reign by good luck.

ANNOT.

The second and fourth Verses perswade me, that this Stanza came to pass in the time of Catharine of Medicis, wife to Henry II. because she lived long, and the King died in the bed of Honour, and thus he saith, that she was left to Reign alone; because her four Sons were all little ones, so that she alone was Regent in France.

The second Verse saith, The holy one being extinguished, first, in the Bed of Honour.

By this word the only one, the Author meaneth not the only Son, but the only one living, such as Henry II. was to her, who was extinguished in the Bed of Honour, and died of the wound he received at Tilting.

The third Verse saith, that after his death, her mourning lasted seven years, that is, from the first of August 1559. to the first of August 1566. because that all those 16 Months that Francis II. she had nothing but continual sorrow, by the conspiracy of Amboise, the secret practises of the King of Navarre, and Prince of Condé his Brother, by the insurrection of the Protestants, when Charles IX. visited his Kingdom, Anno 1556. after which she put off her mourning.

The fourth Verse signifieth, that she should be long lived; for she lived above[258] 60 years, He saith also, that she was Regent by great luck, that is, great luck for her self, but not for the Kingdom, for it was most unhappy in her time.

LXIV.

French.

On ne tiendra pache aucun arresté,
Tous recevants iront par tromperie,
De trefue & paix, Terre & Mer protesté,
Par Barcelone classe prins d’industrie.

English.

No agreement shall be kept,
All those that shall admit of it deal falsly,
There shall be protestations made by Land and Sea,
Barcelone shall take a Fleet by craft.

ANNOT.

This is a description of the sad and calamitous estate of France, in the time of the Civil wars, when no agreement could be kept on the Roman Catholicks side, witness the several Peaces that were made and broken, the Massacre of Vassa, and that infamous perfidy committed by them on St. Bartholomews day, being the 24 of August, Anno 1572.

LXV.

French.

Gris & bureau demy ouverte guerre,
De nuit seront assaillis & pillez,
Le bureau prins passera par la serre,
Son Temple ouvert, deux au plastre grillez.

English.

Between the Gray and sad Gray shall be half open War,
By night they shall be assaulted and plundered,
The sad Gray being taken, shall be put in Custody,
His Temple shall be open, two shall be put in the Grate.

ANNOT.

This Stanza affordeth us a commical History, which is, that about the year 1601. when there sprang up in France a Kind of Friers, who bosted themselves to be the true observers of the Rule of St. Francis, and that the Cordeliers and Capushines did not keep it so exactly, but they had need of a great reformation; the King Henry IV. granted them a Convent at Beaufort, and upon his example many other places desired them, they went to possess themselves of the house of la Blamet, near Angiers; but the Cordeliers being loath to be dispossessed by these new comers, called Recollets, did besiege them by main force, broke open the Gates, scaled the Walls, the besieged did not defend themselves by words or exorcismes, but with good Stones and Flints, so that if the people had not come, the fray would not have ended without murder, some of them were put in Prison, others kept in Custody: this is the meaning of the Author, when he saith, There will be half an open War between the Gray and the sad Gray; for the Cordeliers have a Gray habit, and the Recollets a sad Gray.

[259]

LXVI.

French.

Au fondement de nouvelle secte,
Seront les os du grand Romain trouvez,
Sepulchre en Marbre, apparoistra converte,
Terre trembler en Auril mal enfeüvez.

English.

At the foundation of a new sect,
The Bones of the great Roman shall be found,
The Sepulchre shall appear covered with Marble,
The Earth shall quake in April, they shall be ill buried.

ANNOT.

The meaning is, that when they shall go about to make a foundation of a house, for a new Sect of Friers; they shall find the bones of a famous Roman in a Marble Sepulchre, and that in April the Earth shall quake, whereby many shall be swallowed up.

LXVII.

French.

Au grand Empire par viendra tout un autres,
Bonté distant plees de felicité,
Rege par un issu non loing du peautre,
Corruer Regnes grande infelicité.

English.

To the great Empire quite another shall come,
Being farther from goodness and happiness,
Governed by one of base parentage,
The Kingdom shall fall, a great unhappiness.

ANNOT.

This needeth no Interpretation.

LXVIII.

French.

Lors que Soldats fureur seditieuse,
Contre leur Chef seront denuit fer livre,
Ennemy d’Albe doibt par main furieuse,
Lors vexer Rome & principaux seduire.

English.

When the seditious fury of the Souldiers,
Against their Chief shall make the Iron shine by night,
The enemy d’Albe shall by a furious hand,
Then vex Rome, and seduce the principal one.

[260]

ANNOT.

The Lord de Thou doth judiciously observe, that the Pope being unacquainted with things belonging to War, as to Money, Victuals, and Ammunition, was easily persuaded by Cardinal Caraffa to make war against Spain, for without being provided of all these things, he put his Armies into the Field, nec satis perpendens quám a pecuniâ, milite ac cæteris rebus ad bellum necessariis imparatus intempestive arma sumeret.

In the 15. Book of his History: the Duke of Vrbin had commission to raise 6000. Foot and 300. Horses in the Dukedom of Spoleto, and in Mark of Ancona. John Caraffe the Popes Nephew was made General of the Army, and being but Earl of Mortor, was Created Duke of Palliano, by the confiscation of the goods of Mark Antony Colonna. Camillo Ursini was made General of the Forces in Rome, and in the Territory thereof; Blasius of Monluc, the Mars of his time, and by birth a Gascon, was sent by the King to help (with his advice and courage) the Romans, who are always fitter for the Breviary, then for the Sword.

Besides these Forces raised within the Church Dominions, Charles Caraffa gathered all the Bandittes of Naples and Florence, and raised some Regiments of Switzers that came to succour the Pope.

With these Troops the Pope seized upon the most important places and persons belonging to the Spanish party, as the Coloneses and the Vitelly.

These asked succours of the Emperour Charles the V. who presently commanded Ferdinand of Toledo Duke of Alba to succour them. He was then tasked in the Piemont and Milanes, to resist the French that were then under the conduct of the Marshal of Brissac.

To conclude his design the better, he wrote many Letters to the Pope and the Colledge of Cardinals, full of respect and submission, desiring them to moderate their passion against the Spanish party, but the Pope being angry by several reports, answered him, complaining of many things, which made the Duke resolve to the war, and to be there in person.

He took his occasion as a prudent Captain, when the news was brought to him that the Popes Forces were in mutiny against their General for want of pay, and made a great tumult in the night, hearing that he was approaching with a great train of Artillery. Bzovius saith, that the Earl of Montor regarded more his profit then the Popes Interest, and kept back a great part of the money that was to pay the Souldiers, whence proceeded this tumult, which helped much the Duke of Alva’s business.

This is the explanation of the two first Verses of this Stanza, concerning the mutiny of the Souldiers that were in the Popes service, during which mutiny the enemy d’Alba did not fail to vex Rome; this word the enemy d’Alba doth not signifie the enemy of the Duke of Alba, as if one should say in Latine Hostis Albanus. He did then vex Rome; for in a short time he took Ponte Corvino, Frusino Anagnia, Marino, Lavaci, Prœneste, Tivoli, Ostia, Neptuno, Alba Vico-Varro, Monte Fortino, and almost all the places of the Roman Territory.

This did streighten Rome so much, that the General Camillo Ursini made several Trenches within the Walls of Rome, instead of preserving the outworks, as Montluc would have persuaded him to do; the alarums were so great at Rome, that Montluc was fain to encourage the Romans, and to make a Warlike Speech to them, which is inserted in his Works.

Moreover, the same Duke began to seduce the Principals of Rome by his friends that he had in it, but particularly by the cheat that he put upon the Pope; for his design being to prevent the French Forces, and to surprize the Pope, he resolved to go streight to Rome, and to bring his design the better to pass, he sent Pyrrhus Coffrede to[261] the Pope, to see if there was any way of agreement, to the end that upon this proposition the Pope should mistrust nothing. In the mean time the Duke of Alba was coming near Rome, at which the Pope was so angry, that he put this Embassadour in Prison, where he was kept till the conclusion of the Peace; in this sort were the principal men of Rome seduced, having no thought of the Spaniards approaches, this is the relation of the Lord de Thou, Lib. 16.

LXIX.

French.

La grand pitie sera sans long tarder,
Ceux qui donnoient seront contraints de prendre
Nuds affamez, de froid, soif, soy bander,
Passer les Monts en faisant grand esclandre.

English.

What a great pitty will it be e’re-long,
Those that did give shall be constrained to receive,
Naked, famished with cold, thirst, to mutiny,
To go over the Mountains making great disorders.

ANNOT.

The words of the first Verse, before it be long, is the Key of the Stanza, because we infer from thence it was shortly to happen, as in truth it did at the latter end of the year 1556. when the Duke of Guise came into Piemont to joyn with the Marshal of Brissac. Then the troops of the Marshal seeing those of the Duke better paid then they were, forsook the Marshal, the History saith there was above 1500. of them, and that the Marshal paid the Souldiers of his own money to stay them.

The great pitty was, when he had no more to give, he was compelled by the Kings order it self, and against his own inclination to raise some moneys upon the Countreys. Secondly, to take some Towns and give the plunder to the Souldiers. Thirdly, to permit the Souldiers to pillage the Countrey.

The Author was willing to foretell this, because there was never a man more strict in keeping the Martial discipline, then this General was.

The Marshal of Brissac being thus abused, some of his troops forsook him to follow the Duke of Guise, being for the most part naked and starved with cold, hunger and thirst, which makes the Author to specifie hunger, cold and thirst; want having compelled them to disband, they went over the Mountains, not of Piemont, but the Apennines of Montserrat, and whatsoever thing they found was a Fish for their Net.

LXX.

French.

Un Chef du Monde le grand Cheiren sera,
Plus outre, apres aime, craint, redouté,
Son bruit & los les Cieux surpassera,
Et du seul titre Victeur sort contente.
[262]

English.

A Chief of the World the great Cheiren shall be,
Moreover, beloved afterwards, feared, dreaded,
His fame and praise shall go beyond the Heavens,
And shall be contented with the only title of Victor.

ANNOT.

We have said already before, that the Author by the word Cheyren meaneth Henry the II. his Master, by transposition of Letters, who as he saith was contented with the bare title of Victorieux, when he had undertaken the protection of the German Princes against the Emperour Charles the V.

LXXI.

French.

Quand on viendra le grand Roy parenter,
Avant quil ait du tout l’Ame rendue,
On le verra bien tost apparenter,
D’Aigles, Lions, Croix, Courone de Rüe.

English.

When they shall come to celebrate the obsequies of the great King,
A day before he be quite dead,
He shall be seen presently to be allyed
With Eagles, Lions, Crosses, Crowns of Rüe.

ANNOT.

In the general Peace made Anno 1559. two Marriages were concluded, one of Elizabeth of France, daughter to Henry II. King of France, with Philip II. King of Spain, which was Celebrated at Paris with an extraordinary magnificence, in the presence of the Duke of Alba, the Prince of Orenge, and the Earl of Egmont, who came to fetch the Princess.

In the Celebrating of these Nuptials happened the unfortunate death of Henry II. This brought such a sadness to the Court, that the second match which was between Margaret of France, Daughter to Francis I. and the Duke of Savoy was Celebrated without solemnity.

We must add to this, that the Duke weareth in his Coat of Arms some Eagles, some Lions, some Crosses, and a Crown of Rue; by this, we understand this Stanza, which saith, that the King being mortally wounded, every one was preparing himself to render him the last duties, which the Author calleth to Parante, from the Latine word Parentare, which signifieth to Celebrate the Funeral duties of a man. Thus the second Verse saith, before the day that he yieldeth up his Soul, in hast was the Marriage Celebrated, between the Lady Margaret of France, and the Duke of Savoy, who beareth for his Arms some Eagles, some Lions, some Crosses, and a Crown of Rue.

LXXII.

French.

Par fureur feinte devotion Divine,
Sera la femme du grand fort violée,
Judges voulants damner telle Doctrine,
Victime au peuple ignorant immolée.
[263]

English.

By a faigned fury of Divine inspiration,
The wife of the great one shall be ravished,
Judges willing to condemn such a Doctrine,
A Victimo shall be sacrificed to the ignorant people.

ANNOT.

Of this fact and others as bad, have been seen strange examples, formerly done by those called Enthousiastes, who have committed horrible villanies, under pretence of divine inspiration, some commiting Incests, others rapes, others murders, as may be seen at large in the History of John de Leiden, and other desperate Anabaptists, too tedious to be inserted here; I shall only relate here a little remarkable History, in confirmation of this, to discover the Wiles of the spirits of error, transformed into an Angel of Light.

The 7 day of February 1526. two Brothers, Thomas and Leonard Schyker, living near the Town of St. Gal in Switzerland, did assemble together with some other Anabaptists, in their fathers house, where they passed the most part of the night in discourses, making of faces, and relating of Visions, which every one said he had seen. The next day, upon break of day; Thomas did lay hold on his Brother Leonard, and dragged him in the middle of the company, bid him kneel in the presence of his Father and Mother, and of all the rest there present, and as all the rest of the Company bid him take heed to do any thing amiss; he answered, that there was no need to fear, and that in this business, nothing could be done against the Will of the Father; thereupon he drew his Sword, and cut off the head of his Brother, who was on his knees, all besotted before this murderer. All the rest being astonished, and besides their wits for this furious blow, and lamenting the dead, Thomas ran towards the Town with a fearful Countinance, as a Phanatick besides himself, without Shooes; and having no Cloaths but his Shirt and Breeches. At that time the Burg-master of St. Gal was Joachim Vadian, a wise and learned person, before whom the said Thomas stood, crying aloud with a fearful Countenance, that the day of Judgment was near; saying besides, that strange things had come to pass, (without telling what) that the will of his Father was done for his part. The Burg-master after he had reprehended him very much for his madness, and insolent carriage, commanded a Cloak to be put upon him, and to lead him home softly back again. But in the mean time, news was brought of his detestable murder, whereupon he was apprehended, examined, convicted, and executed. The like hath been done many times for Rapes and Incests: What is particular here, is, that our Author saith, that the Judges being willing to punish such Villanies, yet that unhappy accident shall fall, that an innocent person shall be put to death (belike) instead of the guilty, to please the people.

LXXIII.

French.

En Cité grande en moyne & artisan,
Pres de la porte logez & aux murailles,
Contre modene secret, Cave disant,
Trahis pour faire sous couleur d’espousailles.
[264]

English.

In a great City a Monk and an Artificer,
Dwelling near the Gate, and the Walls,
Near an old woman, ’tis a secret saying Cave,
A Treason shall be plotted under pretence of a Marriage.

ANNOT.

Paradin maketh mention, that in the year 1552. a Monk deceived the Marshal of Brissac, making him believe that he would put him in possession of the Town of Quizres, if he would give him so much for reward. The Marshal used all the Caution possible, not to be deceived by that Imposter, who took Money on both sides, viz. the French and the Spaniards; nevertheless the Monk plaid the Knave with him, and the undertakings proved prejudicial to the French, though not considerably by reason of the precaution of the said Marshal.

The same Author writes, that in the year 1555. the 17 of August, the Spaniard had designed to retake Cazal, the same way that the French had surprised it. First, they had got a Widow in the Town, who received the undertakers in her house, which was near the Gate, and the Wall. Secondly there was a Marriage to be made between two persons of quality, where great Cheer and rejoycings were to be. Thirdly they got a woman that carryed Herbs to sell in the Town, and under the Herbs the Letters were hidden. The Author says likewise, that there was a Monk and a Tradesman, that lodged at this Widows house, those two actors in this business, viz. the Monk said Tradesman, ane secretly to the woman that sold Herbs, Cave, which signifies take heed, they said these words secretly near Matrone, that is, they whisperd in her ear Cave. Their design was to betray the Town, under pretence of a Marriage, but it did not succeed; because the Letters in the womans Basket were intercepted, the Vulgar impression hath a fault in the third Verse, where there is Modene instead of Matrone, and another in the fourth Verse, when instead of Treason, they have put for betrayed. The History obligeth us to correct it, as we have done.

LXXIV.

French.

Le dechassé au regne tournera,
Ses ennemis trouvez des conjurez,
Plus que jamais son temps triomphera,
Trois & septante a mort trop asseurez.

English.

The expelled shall come again to the Kingdom,
Her enemies shall be found to be the Conspirators,
More than ever his time shall triumph,
Three and seventy appointed for death.

ANNOT.

This is a clear and express prediction of the happy restauration of his sacred Majesty, and our dread Sovereign Charles II. now Reigning, who after a long exile is come again to enjoy his own Kingdom, and to flourish more than ever he did before, by these seventy appointed to death, are meant the Judges and murderers of his Father, who with some few others of the same gang made about that number, and[265] some of which have payed their shot by the hand of publick Justice, others have prevented their shame by dying before hand, others have been their own Executioners, and those that remain, lead a life worse then death it self; so true it is that vengeance dances the round.

LXXV.

French.

Le grand Pilot sera par Roy mandé,
Laisser la classe pour plus haut lieu atteindre,
Sept ans apres sera contrebandé,
Barbare Armée viendra Venise craindre.

English.

The great Pilot shall be sent for by the King,
To leave the Fleet, and be preferred to a higher place,
Seven years after he shall be countermanded,
A Barbarian Army shall put Venice to a fright.

ANNOT.

This needeth no further explanation.

LXXVI.

French.

La Cité antique d’Antenorée forge,
Plus ne pouvant le Tyran supporter,
Le manche feint au Temple couper gorge,
Les siens le peuple a mort viendra bouter.

English.

The ancient City founded by Antenor,
Being not able to bear the Tyrant any longer,
With a fained haft, in the Church cut a throat,
The people will come to put his servants to death.

ANNOT.

The City founded by Antenor (who was Companion and came into Italy with Æneas) is Padua, a University of the Venetians, of which it is said here, that being no longer able to bear a Tyrant, the said Tyrant shall be murdered in the Church with a knife hidden in a haft, and all his Men and Servants killed by the people of the Town.

LXXVII.

French.

Par la victoire du deceu fraudulente,
Deux classes une, la revolte Germaine,
La Chef meurtry & son fils dans la Tente,
Florence, Imole pourchassez dans Romaine.
[266]

English.

By the deceitful victory of the deceived,
One of the two Fleets shall revolt to the Germans,
The Chief and his Son murdered in their Tent,
Florence, Imole persecuted in Romania.

ANNOT.

The three first Verses are plain. Florence and Imole are two Cities of Italy, seated in the Province of Romania.

LXXVIII.

French.

Crier victoire du grand Selin croissant,
Par les Romains sera l’Aigle clamé,
Ticin, Milan, & Gennesny consent
Puis par eux mesmes Basil grand reclamé.

English.

They shall cry up the victory of the great Selins half Moon,
By the Romans the Eagle shall be claimed,
Ticin, Milan and Genoa, consent not,
Then by themselves the great Basil shall be claimed.

ANNOT.

The first Verse foretelleth some conquests of the Turks, whose Arms is the half Moon. The second Verse signifies, the Romans shall move the Emperour to succour them, which is the Eagle. Ticin, Milan and Genoa shall refuse to give help, and afterwards they shall call the great Basil (which in Greek signifies the great King, from βασίλευς) to their help.

LXXIX.

French.

Pres de Tesin les habitants de Logre,
Garonne & Saone, Seine, Tar, & Gironde:
Outre les Monts dresseront promonitoire,
Conflict donné, Pau franchi, submerge onde.

English.

Near the Tesin the Inhabitants of Logre,
Garonne and Saone, Seine, Tar and Gironde,
Shall erect a promontory beyond the Mountains,
A Battle shall be fought, the Po shall be passed over, some shall be drowned in it.

ANNOT.

Tesin is the River that passeth by Milan. Garonne, Saone, Seine, Tar, and Gironde are Rivers of France. Po is the greatest River of Italy.

[267]

LXXX.

French.

De Fez le Regne parviendra a ceux d’Europe,
Feu leur Cité, & Lame tranchera,
Le grand d’Asie Terre & Mer a grand troupe,
Que bleux, pars, Croix a mort dechassera.

English.

The Kingdom of Fez shall come to those of Europe,
Fire and Sword shall destroy their City,
The great one of Asia by Land and Sea with a great troop,
So that blews, greens, Crosses to death he shall drive.

ANNOT.

This is strange Prophecy if it prove true, viz. that the Kingdom of Fez (which is in Africa) shall be taken by those of Europe, and the Town put to Fire and Sword, after which the great one of Asia (meaning the great Turk) shall come by Land and by Sea with an innumerable Army, and shall drive and destroy all before him.

LXXXI.

French.

Pleurs, cris & plaincts, heurlemens, effrayeur,
Cœur inhumain, cruel, noir & transy:
Leman, les Isles de Gennes les majeurs,
Sang espancher, tochsain, a nul mercy.

English.

Tears, cryes and complaints, howlings, fear,
An inhumane heart, cruel, black, astonished,
Leman, the Islands the great ones of Genoa,
Shall spill blood, the Bell shall ring out, no mercy shall be given.

ANNOT.

This foretels bloody Wars only, and needs no interpretation.

LXXXII.

French.

Par les Deserts de lieu libre & farouche,
Viendra errer Neveu du grand Pontife,
Assomme a sept avec lourde souche,
Par ceux qu’apres occuperont le Scyphe.

English.

Through the Deserts of a free and ragged place,
The Nephew of the Pope shall come to wander,
Knockt in the head by seven with a heavy Club,
By those who after shall obtain the Scyphe.

[268]

ANNOT.

This signifies that the Nephew of a Pope shall be driven away, and shall wander in a desert place, where he shall be knockt in the head by seven men, one of which shall afterwards enjoy the Papacy; for Scyphe is a Latine word, signifying a Cup or Chalue, such as the Romish Priests say Mass with, and take the Sacrament.

LXXXIII.

French.

Celuy qu’aura tant d’honneurs & caresses,
A son entrée en la Gaule Belgique,
Un temps apres sera tant de rudesses,
Et sera contre a la fleur tant bellique.

English.

He that shall have had so many honours and welcoms,
At his going into Flanders,
A while after shall commit so many rudenesses,
And shall be against the warlike flower.

ANNOT.

This is positively concerning the Duke of Alencon, Brother to Henry III. King of France, who having been sent for by the States of the Low-Countreys, and received with much honour to be their General and Governour against the Spaniard, did most unworthily break his trust, and being come to Antwerp, he was so ravished with the beauty and riches of the Town, that he seized upon it for himself, but was beaten out by the Citizens, and most of his men killed.

The fourth Verse saith. He shall be against the warlike flower; that is, his action shall be against Military Honour, and common practice of Honourable Souldiers.

LXXXIV.

French.

Celuy qu’en Sparte Claude ne veut regner,
Il fera tant par voye seductive,
Que du court, long, le sera arraigner,
Que contre Roy fera sa perspective.

English.

He that Claudius will not have to reign in Sparta,
The same shall do so much by a deceitful way,
That he shall cause him to be arraigned short and long,
As if he had made his prospect upon the King.

ANNOT.

I believe the words of Claudius and Sparta here are Metaphorical, and the Author was unwilling they should be known.

The sense is, one shall be hindred from Reigning by another, whom he shall accuse of Treason against the King.

[269]

LXXXV.

French.

La grand Cité de Tharse par Gaulois,
Sera d’estriute captifs tous a Turban,
Secours par Mer du grand Portugalois,
Premier d’esté le jour du sacre Vrban.

English.

The great City of Tharsis shall be taken by the French,
All those that were at Turban shall be made slaves,
Succours by Sea from the great Portugals,
The first day of the Summer, and of the installation of Urban.

ANNOT.

Here are two difficulties in this Stanza; the first is, what the Author means by the great City Tharsis; the second is in the last Verse, what he meaneth by the Installation of Vrban, I believe he meaneth no more then the election of a Pope, whose name shall be Urban.

LXXXVI.

French.

Le grand Prelat un jour apres son songe,
Interprete au rebours de son sens,
De la Gascogne luy surviendra un Monge,
Qui fera eslire le grand Prelat de Sens.

English.

The great Prelate the next day after his dream,
Interpreted contrary to his sense,
From Gascony shall come to him a Monge,
That shall cause the great Prelate of Sens to be elected.

ANNOT.

Monge is a Barbarous word, that hath no relation to any Language in the world, (that I know) unless it signifies a Monk. Sens is a fine City, about threescore Miles beyond Paris, towards the South, and the Seat of an Arch-Bishop, who it seemeth shall be elected into some eminent place, the next day after he that was in it shall dream a dream, that shall be interpreted contrary to the sense and meaning of it.

LXXXVII.

French.

L’election faicte dans Francfort,
N’aura nul lieu, Milan s’opposera,
Le sien plus proche semblera si grand fort,
Qu’oute le Rhin Marais les chassera.
[270]

English.

The election made at Francford,
Shall be void, Milan shall oppose it,
He of the Milan party shall be so strong,
As to drive the other beyond the Marshes of the Rhine.

ANNOT.

The Election of Francford is concerning an Emperour; for there they are elected, Crowned. The rest is plain.

LXXXVIII.

French.

Un Regne grand demourra desolé,
Aupres de l’Hebro se seront assemblées,
Monts Pyrenees le rendront consolé,
Lors que dans May seront Terres tremblées.

English.

A great Kingdom shall be left desolate,
Near the River Hebrus an assembly shall be made,
The Pyrenean Mountains shall comfort him,
When in May shall be an Earth-quake.

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation, but what any one may give that knoweth where the River Hebrus is.

LXXXIX.

French.

Entre deux cymbes pieds & mains attachez,
De miel face oingt & de laict substante,
Guespes & mouches feront amour fachez,
Poccilateurs faucer, Scyphe tente.

English.

Between two Boats one shall be tyed hand and foot,
His face annointed with Honey, and he nourished with Milk,
Wasps and Bees shall make much of him in anger,
For being treacherous Cup-bearers, and poisoning the Cup.

ANNOT.

This is a description of the punishment which the Persians use to afflict upon poisoners; for they were put between two Troughs, which are here called Boats, from their likeness to them, with their face only uncovered, which was daubed with Honey, that the Wasps and Bees might be drawn to it and torment them, they were fed with Milk, which if they refused to do, and had rather dye than be so tormented, then did the Tormenter prick their Eyes with Needles to force them to their diet, and so were they left, till the Vermin eat them up. We have an example of this in the Life of Artaxerxes King of Persia.

[271]

XC.

French.

L’honnessement puant abominable,
Apres la faict sera felicité,
Grand excusé, pour n’estre favorable,
Qu’a paix Neptune ne sera incité.

English.

The stinking and abominable defiling
After the secret shall succeed well,
The great one shall be excused for not being favourable,
That Neptune might be perswaded to peace.

ANNOT.

By the two first Verses it seemeth that some abominable action, after its effect shall succeed well; the two last signifie, that a great person shall be excused for not permitting the Fleet to be at peace.

XCI.

French.

Le conducteur de la guerre Navale,
Rouge effrené, severe horrible grippe,
Captif eschapé de l’aisné dans la baste,
Quand il naistra du grand un Fils Agrippe.

English.

The leader of the naval forces,
Red, rash, severe, horrible extortioner,
Being slave, shall escape, hidden amongst the Harnesses,
When a Son named Agrippa, shall be born to the great one.

ANNOT.

This needeth no Interpretation, the words being so plain.

XCII.

French.

Princesse de beauté tant venuste,
Au chef menée, le second faict trahy,
La Cité au Glaive poudre face aduste,
Par trop grand meurtre le chef du Roy hay.

English.

A Princess of an exquisite beauty,
Shall be brought to the General, the second time the fact shall be betrayed,
The City shall be given to the Sword and fire,
By two great a murder the chief Person about the King shall be hated.

ANNOT.

The only difficulty lyes in what City he doth mean.

[272]

XCIII.

French.

Prelat avare, d’ambition trompé,
Rien ne fera que trop cuider viendra,
Ses Messagers, & luy bien attrapé,
Tout au rebours voir qui les bois fendra.

English.

A covetous Prelate, deceived by ambition,
Shall do nothing but covet too much,
His messengers and he shall be trapt,
When they shall see one cleave the Wood the contrary way.

ANNOT.

This needeth no Annotation.

XCIV.

French.

Un Roy iré sera aux sedifragues,
Quand interdicts seront harnois de guerre,
La poison taincte au succre par les fragues,
Par eaux meurtris, morts, disant, serre, serre.

English.

A King shall be angry against the Covenant-breakers,
When the Warlike Armour shall be forbidden,
The Poison with Sugar shall be put in the Strawberries,
They shall be murdered and die, saying, close, close.

ANNOT.

The words are plain.

XCV.

French.

Par detracteur calomnié puis nay,
Quand istront faicts enormes & martiaux,
La moindre part dubieuse a l’aisné,
Et tost au Regne seront faicts partiaux.

English.

The youngest Son shall be calumniated by a slanderer,
When enormous and Martial deeds shall be done,
The least part shall be left doubtfull to the
Eldest, and soon after they shall be both equal in the Kingdom.

ANNOT.

This lacketh no interpretation.

[273]

XCVI.

French.

Grand Cité a Soldats abandonnée,
Onc ny eut mortel tumult si proche,
O quelle hideuse calamités approche,
Fors une offence n’y sera pardonnée.

English.

A great City shall be given up to the Souldiers,
There was never a mortal tumult so near,
Oh! what a hideous calamity draws near,
Except one offence nothing shall be spared.

ANNOT.

This is concerning the taking of the Town of St. Quentin in 1557. because the Author saith, no tumult was like this, so near the year 1555. when our Author writ.

He calleth it great City; because it is one of the most considerable in France, therefore it was besieged by the King of Spain with 37000. men, and 12000. Horses and 8000. English. The plunder was given to the Souldiers; for it was taken by assault.

There was never a mortal tumult so near; for the Souldiers taking revenge upon the Inhabitants, and Garrison, put all to the Sword; the Admiral having much ado to save himself.

In consequence of this our Prophet cryeth, O what a fearfull calamity; because the taking of this Town joyned with the loss of St. Laurence did almost ruine France. He addeth, except one offence nothing shall be forgiven; that is, the Town should be afflicted in all respects, except that it should not be burnt. The taking of this Town was upon the 27 of August, 17 days after the Battle of St. Laurence.

The loss was so great to France, that the King was fained to call the Duke of Guise back from Italy, and Charles V. hearing this news, asked presently if his Son Philip was not in Paris, as much as to say, it was a thing he ought to have done.

But God permitted that the King of Spain went another way, and in the mean time, the King of France strengthned himself, and the Duke of Guise took from the English, Calais, Guines, and the County of d’Oye. The Spanish History saith, that Philip had forbidden to touch any old people, Children and Ecclesiastical persons; but above all St. Quentins reliques.

XCVII.

French.

Cinq & quarante degrez ciel bruslera,
Feu approcher de la grand Cité neuve,
Instant grand flamme esparse sautera,
Quand on voudra des Normans faire preuve.
[274]

English.

The Heaven shall burn at five and forty degrees,
The fire shall come near the great new City,
In an instant a great flame dispersed shall burst out,
When they shall make a trial of the Normans.

ANNOT.

This signifies some extraordinary lightning under five and forty degrees, which is about the Southern part of France.

It is not easie to guess what he meaneth by the great new City, unless it be one in the Authors Countrey, called Villa Nova.

The last Verse seemeth to intimate, that this shall happen when an Army of Normandie shall be raised.

XCVIII.

French.

Ruyne aux Volsques de peur si fort terribles,
Leur grand Cité taincte, faict pestilent:
Piller Sol, Lune, & violer leur Temples,
Et les deux Fleuves rougir de sang coulant.

English.

A ruine shall happen to the Volsques that are so terrible,
Their great City shall be dyed, a pestilent deed:
They shall plunder Sun and Moon, and violate their Temples,
And the two Rivers shall be red with running blood.

ANNOT.

The Volsi were a warlike people of Italy joyning to Rome, which makes me believe that by the great City he meaneth Rome, which was plundered and sackt by the Duke of Burgondy and the Prince of Orange, Generals of the Emperour Charles V.

XCIX.

French.

L’Ennemy docte se tournera confus,
Grand Camp malade, & de faict par embusches
Monts Pyrenees luy seront faicts refus.
Roche du Fleuve descouvrant antique ruches.

English.

The learned enemy shall go back confounded,
A great Camp shall be sick, and in effect through ambush,
The Pyrenean Mountains shall refuse him.
Near the River discovering the ancient Hives.

ANNOT.

The words are plain, though the sense be too obscure, and I shall not endeavour to give an interpretation, when every one may make one himself.

[275]

C.

French.

Fill de Laure, asyle du mal sain,
Ou jusqu’au Ciel se void l’Amphitheatre:
Prodige veu, ton mal est fort prochain,
Seras captive, & des fois plus de quatre.

English.

Daughter of Laura, Sanctuary of the sick,
Where to the Heavens is seen the Amphitheatre,
A prodigy being seen, the danger is near,
Thou shalt be taken captive above four times.

ANNOT.

This is an ingenious Stanza, concerning the City of Nismes in Languedoc, famous for its Amphitheatre built by the Romans, and remaining to this day, which Town he calleth Daughter of Laura, because the Lady Laura, Mistress to the famous Poet Petrarche was born thereabout; he also calleth it Sanctuary of the sick, for the salubrity of the air.

The meaning of the two last Verses is, that when a prodigy shall be seen, viz. Civil War in France, it shall be taken above four times, as it hath happened by one party or other.

Legis cautio contra ineptos Criticos.

Qui legent hos versus, maturè censunto:
Prophanum vulgus & inscium ne attrectato:
Omnesque Astrologi, Blenni, Barbari procul sunto,
Qui aliter faxit, is rite sacer esto.

[276]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY VII.

I.

French.

L’Arc du Thresor par Achilles deceu,
Aux procrées sceu le Quadrangulaire,
Au fait Roial le comment sera sceu,
Corps veu pendu au Sceu du populaire.

English.

The bow of the Treasure by Achilles deceived,
Shall shew to posterity the Quadrangulary,
In the Royal deed the Comment shall be known,
The body shall be seen hanged in the knowledge of the people.

ANNOT.

By the bow of the Treasure, is understood the Marshal d’Ancre, Favorite to the Queen Regent of France Mary of Medicis, who was first complained of, for his maleversations by Achilles de Harlay President of Paris, whence followed his death being Pistolled in the Quadrangle of the Louvre, by the command of Lewis XIII. and his body afterwards dragged through the streets, and hanged publickly by the people upon the new Bridge.

[277]

II.

French.

Par Mars ouvert Arles ne donra guerre,
De nuit seront les Soldats estonnez,
Noir, blanc, a l’Inde dissimulez en terre.
Soubs la feinte ombre traistre verrez sonnez.

English.

Arles shall not proceed by open War,
By night the Souldiers shall be astonished,
Black, white, and blew, dissembled upon the ground.
Under the fained shadow you shall see them proclaimed Traitors.

ANNOT.

Arles is a considerable City in France; the rest is plain.

III.

French.

Apres de France la victoire Navale,
Les Barchinons, Salinons, les Phocens,
Lierre d’or, l’Enclume serré dans balle,
Ceux de Toulon au fraud seront consents.

English.

After the Naval victory of the French,
Upon those of Tunis, Sally, and the Phocens,
A golden Juy the Anvil shut up in a pack,
Those of Toulon to the fraud shall consent.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth a Naval victory to the French against the Turks, by the means of a Granado, called Anvil, that shall be shut up in a Barrel by a plot, to which those of Toulon shall be privy.

IV.

French.

Le Duc de Langres assiegé dedans Dole,
Accompagné d’Authun & Lionnois,
Geneve, Auspourg, ceux de la Mirandole,
Passer les Monts contre les Anconois.

English.

The Duke of Langres shall be besieged in Dole,
Being in company with those of Autun and Lion,
Geneva, Auspourg, those of Mirandola,
Shall go over the Mountains against those of Ancona.

[278]

ANNOT.

Langres is a City in France, whose Bishop is a Duke and a Peer of the Kingdom; Dole is a City in Burgundy, so is Autun and Lion, Geneva is a City by Savoy, Auspourg, another in Germany, Mirandola is a Countrey in Italy, so is Ancona.

V.

French.

Vin sur la Table en sera respandu,
Le tiers naura celle quil pretendoit,
Deux fois du noir de Parme descendu,
Perouse & Pise fera ce quil cuidoit.

English.

Wine shall be spilt upon the Table,
By reason that a third man shall not have her whom he intended,
Twice the black one descended from Parma,
Shall do to Perusa and Pisa what he intended.

ANNOT.

Perusa, Pisa, and Parma, are three Cities in Italy.

VI.

French.

Naples, Palerme, & toute la Sicile,
Par main Barbare sera inhabitée,
Corsique, Salerne & de Sardaigne l’Isle,
Faim, peste, guerre, fin de maux intemptée.

English.

Naples, Palermo, and all Sicily,
By barbarous hands shall be depopulated,
Corsica, Salerno, and the Island of Sardinia,
In them shall be famine, plague, war, and endless evils.

ANNOT.

Naples is a City in Italy, Palermo is a City in the Island of Sicily. Corsica, an Island in the Mediterranean Sea, belonging to the Genoese; Salerno is a Town in Italy; Sardinia an Island in the Mediterranean. The Reader may easily make an interpretation of the rest.

VII.

French.

Sur le combat des grands chevaux legers,
On criera le grand croissant confond,
De nuit tuer Moutons, Brebis, Bergers,
Abysmes rouges dans le fossé profond.
[279]

English.

At the fight of the great light Horsmen,
They shall cry out, confound the great half Moon,
By night they shall kill Sheep, Ewes, and Shepherds,
Red pits shall be in the deep ditch.

ANNOT.

By the great half Moon, is understood the Turk.

VIII.

French.

Flora fuis, fuis le plus proche Romain,
Au Fesulan sera conflict donné,
Sang espandu les plus grands pris en main,
Temple ne Sexe ne sera pardonné.

English.

Flora fly, fly from the next Roman,
In the Fesulan shall be the fight,
Blood shall be spilt, the greatest shall be taken,
Temple nor Sex shall be spared.

ANNOT.

Fesulan is a Countrey in Italy. Flora is the Goddess of Flowers, the rest is easie.

IX.

French.

Dame en l’absence de son grand Capitaine,
Sera priée d’amour du Viceroy,
Feinte promesse & malheureuse estreine,
Entre les mains du grand Prince Barroy.

English.

A Lady in the absence of her great Captain,
Shall be intreated of love by the Viceroy,
A fained promise, and unhappy new years gift,
In the hand of the great Prince of Bar.

ANNOT.

Bar is a principality joyning to Lorrain, which Henry IV. King of France gave for a Portion to his Sister Catharine, when she married the Duke of Lorrains Son. The rest is plain.

X.

French.

Par le grand Prince limitrophe du Mans,
Preux & vaillant chef de grand exercite,
Par Mer & Terre de Galois & Normans,
Cap passer Barcelonne pillé l’Isle.
[280]

English.

The great Prince dwelling near the Mans,
Stout and valiant, General of a great Army,
Of Welchmen and Normans by Sea and Land,
Shall pass the Cape Barcelone, and plunder the Island.

ANNOT.

Mans is a City in France, chief of the Province called le Main. The rest is plain.

XI.

French.

L’Enfant Roial contemnera la Mere,
Oeil, pieds blessez, rude inobeissant,
Nouvelle a Dame estrange & bien amere,
Seront tuez des siens plus de cinq cens.

English.

The Royal Child shall despise his Mother,
Eye, feet wounded, rude disobedient,
News to a Lady very strange and bitter,
There shall be killed of hers above five hundred.

ANNOT.

This was fulfilled about the year 1615. when Lewis XIII. King of France, being then about 15 years of age, by the perswasion of some Grandees about him, made War against his own Mother Mary of Medicis, then Regent of the Kingdom, whereupon was fought between them the Battle du pont de say, where above five hundred on the Queens side were slain, whereupon it was a good Jest of the Prince of Guimena, who being required by the Queen Anna of Austria, to lay his hand upon her side; and to feel her Child (now Lewis XIV.) stirring, after he had felt; now I know, said he, he is a true Son of Bourbon; for he beginneth to kick his Mother.

XII.

French.

Le grand puisnay fera fin de la guerre,
En deux lieux assemble les excusez,
Cahors, Moissac, iront loing de la serre,
Rufec, Lectoure, les Agenois rasez.

English.

The great younger Brother shall make an end of the War,
In two places he shall gather the excused,
Cahors, Moissac, shall go out of his clutches,
Ruffec, Lectoure, and those of Agen shall be cut off.

ANNOT.

Cahors, Moissac, Ruffec, Lectoure, Agen, are all Cities of the Province of Guyenne in France.

[281]

XIII.

French.

De la Cité Marine & tributaire,
La teste rase prendra la Satrapie,
Chasser sordide qui puis sera contraire,
Par quatorze and tiendra la Tyrannie.

English.

Of the City Maritine and tributary,
The shaven head shall take the Government,
He shall turn out a base man who shall be against him,
During fourteen years he will keep the tyranny.

ANNOT.

This is positive concerning the Cardinal of Richelieu, who made himself Governor of Havre de Grace, called here the Maritine City, and there kept his Treasure, and tyrannised for the space of about fourteen years.

XIV.

French.

Faux exposer viendra Topographie,
Seront les Urnes des Monuments ouvertes,
Pulluler Sectes, sainte Philosophie,
Pour blanches noires, & pour antiques vertes.

English.

They shall expound Topography falsly,
The Urnes of the Monuments shall be open,
Sects shall multiply, and holy Philosophy
Shall give black for white, and green for old.

ANNOT.

This is a perfect description of our late miserable estate in England, when there was such multiplicity of Sects, and such a Prophanation of sacred things.

XV.

French.

Devant Cité de l’Insubre Countrée,
Sept ans sera le Siege devant mis,
Le tres-grand Roy fera son entrée,
Cité puis libre hors de ses ennemis.

English.

Before a City of Piemont,
Seven years the Siege shall be laid,
The most great King shall make his entry into it,
Then the City shall be free being out of the enemies hand.

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

[282]

XVI.

French.

Entrée profonde par la grande Roine faite,
Rendra le lieu puissant inaccessible,
L’Armée de trois Lions sera défaite,
Faisant dedans cas hideux & terrible.

English.

The deep entry made by the Queen,
Shall make the place powerful and inaccessible,
The Army of the three Lions shall be routed,
Doing within an hideous and terrible thing.

ANNOT.

A Queen shall cause such a deep Trench to be made before a Town, that it shall be impregnable, and the Army of Lions, that is either Generals, or of a Prince that shall bear three Lions in his Arms, shall be routed.

XVII.

French.

Le Prince rare en pitié & clemence,
Apres avoir la paix aux siens baillé,
Viendra changer par mort grand cognoissance,
Apres grand repos le regne travaillé.

English.

The Prince rare in pity and Clemency,
After he shall have given peace to his Subjects,
Shall by death change his great knowledge,
After great rest the Kingdom shall be troubled.

ANNOT.

This positively concerneth Henry the IV. King of France; who after he had by many Battles and dangers given peace to his Kingdom, was by a Murderer snatched away, and the Kingdom put into new troubles, by the war that the Princes had among themselves.

XVIII.

French.

Les Assiegez couloureront leurs paches,
Sept jours apres feront cruelle issüe,
Dans repoulsez, feu, sang, sept mis a l’hache,
Dame captive qu’avoit la paix issüe.

English.

The Besieged shall dawb their Articles,
Seven days after they shall make a cruel event,
They shall be beaten back, fire, blood, seven put to death,
The Lady shall be Prisoner who endeavoured to make peace.

[283]

ANNOT.

This needeth no interpretation.

XIX.

French.

Le Fort Nicene ne sera combatu,
Vaincu sera par rutilant metal,
Son fait sera un long temps debatu,
Aux Citadins estrange espouvental.

English.

The Fort Nicene shall not be fought against,
By shining metal it shall be overcome,
The doing of it shall be long and debating,
It shall be a strange fearful thing to the Citizens.

ANNOT.

Nice is a Town in Piemont, situated by the Sea side, now whether this Prophecy came to pass in the time of the Wars between France and Savoy, or shall come to pass hereafter, it is more then I can tell. As for winning of it by glistering Metal, it is no new thing or practice, witness Philippus of Macedon, who said no City was impregnable, wherein might enter an Ass loaded with gold.

XX.

French.

Ambassadeurs de la Toscane langue,
Avril & May Alpes & Mer passer,
Celuy de Veau exposera l’harangue,
Vie Gauloise en voulant effacer.

English.

The Embassadors of the Tuscan tongue,
In April and May, shall go over the Alpes and the Sea,
One like a Calf shall make a speech:
Attempting to defame the French customes.

ANNOT.

The sense and the words are plain.

XXI.

French.

Par pestilente inimitie Volsicque,
Dissimulée chassera le Tyran,
Au Pont de Sorgues se fera la trafique,
De mettre a mort luy & son adherent.
[284]

English.

By a pestilent Italian enmity,
The dissembler shall expel the Tyrant,
The bargain shall be made at Sorgues Bridge,
To put him and his adherent to death.

ANNOT.

There is no difficulty in this.

XXII.

French.

Les Citoiens de Mesopotamie,
Irez encontre amis de Tarragone,
Jeux, Ris, Banquets toute gent endormie,
Vicaire au Prone, pris Cité, ceux d’Ausone.

English.

The Citizens of Mesopotamia,
Being angry with the friends of Tarragone,
Playes, laughter, feasts, every body being asleep,
The Vicar being in the Pulpit, City taken by those of Ausone.

ANNOT.

By the Citizens of Mesopotamia, is understood a people that live between two Rivers, from the Greek words μέσος and ποταμὸς, the rest is easie. We have said before, that by Ausone the Author understands the City of Bourdeaux, which he called Ausone, from the Poet and Consul of Rome Ausonius who was born there.

XXIII.

French.

Le Roial Sceptre sera contraint de prendre,
Ce que ses Predecesseurs voient engagé,
Puis a Laigneau on fera mal entendre,
Lors qu’on viendra le Palais saccager.

English.

The Royal Scepter shall be constrained to take
What his Predecessors had morgaged;
After that, they shall mis-inform the Lamb,
When they shall come to plunder the Palace.

ANNOT.

This is obvious to every body’s capacity.

[285]

XXIV.

French.

L’Ensevely sortira du tombeau,
Fera de chaisnes lier le fort du pont,
Empoisoné avec œufs de Barbeau,
Grand de Lorrain par le Marquis du pont.

English.

The buried shall come out of his Grave,
He shall cause the fort of the Bridge to be tied with Chains,
Poisoned with Barbels hard Row,
Shall a great one of Lorrain be by the Marques du pont.

ANNOT.

This Prophecie is divided in two parts. The first two Verses talk of a man that shall be taken out of his Grave alive. The two last speak, that a great man of Lorrain shall be poisoned by the Marques de pont, in the Row of a Barbel, which according to Physitians, is a dangerous meat of it self, and chiefly if it be Stewed, the Poisoner himself seemeth to be no other than a Duke of Lorrain, or one of his Sons, for he stileth himself N. Duke of Lorrain, Prince of Bar, and Marques du Pont.

XXV.

French.

Par guerre longue tout l’exercite espuiser,
Que pour Soldats ne trouveront pecune,
Lieu d’Or, d’Argent cair on viendra cuser,
Gaulois Ærain, signe croissant de Lune.

English.

By a long War, all the Army drained dry,
So that to raise Souldiers they shall find no Money,
Instead of Gold and Silver, they shall stamp Leather,
The French Copper, the mark of the stamp the new Moon.

ANNOT.

This maketh me remember the miserable condition of many Kingdoms, before the west-Indies were discovered; for in Spain Lead was stamped for Money, and so in France in the time of King Dagobert, and it seemeth by this Stanza, that the like is to come again, by reason of a long and tedious War.

XXVI.

French.

Fustes Galées autour de sept Navires,
Sera livrée une mortelle guerre,
Chef de Madrid recevra coups de vires,
Deux eschapées & cinq menez a Terre.
[286]

English.

Fly-boats and Galleys round about seven Ships,
A mortal War there shall be,
The chief of Madrid shall receive blows of Oars,
Two shall escape, and five carried to Land.

ANNOT.

Paradin saith in his History, that in the year 1555. towards the end of August, those of Diepe had permission from the King to fight a Fleet of the Spaniards, which was coming into Flanders, and brought Men, Money, and several Merchandises. They went to Sea, and after much searching, they discovered the Fleet, wherein were 22 great Ships.

The Diepois had but 19 men of War, and five or six Pinnaces, with which they set upon them between Calais and Dover. The fight was very bloody, almost all the Ships grapled one with another, and being so close together, represented a Land fight.

The French at last did their utmost endeavour against the Admiral, which was succoured by six other Ships, of which two were taken with the Admiral, and carryed to Diepe; this is the Authors meaning, when he saith, Fly-boats and Galleys about seven Ships. He nameth the Admiral Chief of Madrid; that is, chief Spaniard, which received blows of Oars, whose Ship was taken, and four more of his Company, which were brought to Diepe. In this agree the Historians on both sides.

XXVII.

French.

Au coin de Vast la grand Cavalerie,
Proche a Ferrare empeschée au Bagage,
Pompe a Turin front telle volerie,
Que dans le fort raviront leur hostage.

English.

In the corner of Vast the great Troop of Horse,
Near Ferrara, shall be busied about the baggage,
Pompe at Turin, they shall make such a robbery,
That in the Fort they shall ravish their hostage.

ANNOT.

I could not find what he meaneth by this place Vast, which being the Key of all the rest, I could proceed no further, but am constrained to go to bed, and leave this for to night, among Insolubilia de Alliaco.

XXVIII.

French.

Le Capitaine conduira grande proye,
Sur la Montagne des ennemis plus proche,
Environné par feu fera telle voye,
Tous eschapez, or trente mis en broche.
[287]

English.

The Captain shall lead a great Prey
Upon the Mountain, that shall be nearest to the Enemies,
Being encompassed with fire, he shall make such a way,
That all shall escape, but thirty that shall be spitted.

ANNOT.

The two first Verses are plain.

The meaning of the last two is, that the said Captain being encompassed with Fire, shall make himself such a way, that all his men shall escape, but thirty that shall be spitted by the enemies.

XXIX.

French.

Le grand Duc d’Albe se viendra rebeller,
A ses grands peres fera le tradiment,
Le grand de Guise le viendra debeller,
Captif mené & dresse monument.

English.

The great Duke of Alba shall rebel,
To his Grandfathers he shall make the Plot,
The great Guise shall vanquish him,
Led Prisoner, and a Monument erected.

ANNOT.

Ferdinand of Toledo, Duke of Alba in Spain, a faithfull servant of Charles V. and Philip II. his Son, after he had made several proofs of his Valour, and prudence in the affairs of Piemont and Milanese, was commanded to go to Naples and Rome, to succour the Colonesse, and others of the Spanish party; to obey this command, the Author saith, He went about to rebel, not against his Prince, but his Grandfathers, viz. the Pope and the Cardinals, upon which the Senate of Venice wrote to him, desiring that he would not trouble the Pope, seeing that all his Predecessors had fought for him, as the Lord of Thou saith in his sixteenth Book; but he answered, that it was the Pope himself that was the cause of it, and that he was bound to oppose him.

During that rebellion to his great fathers, as the Author calleth it, the great de Guise, came with his Troops, and compelled him to a diversion, and to let alone Marshal Strozzy, the Cardinal Caraffa, Captain Montluc, Camillo Ursini, Captain Charry, and others; so that all the Countrey about Rome was freed, and thus the Author saith, the great de Guise shall come to quell him.

The fourth Verse addeth two things, that a Prisoner was carryed away, and that a Monument was erected. History makes no mention of the Prisoner, unless it were that Captain Montluc, having taken by assault the Town of Pianea or Corsmian, by a sink which he broke; the Captain Gougues a Gascon being a Prisoner of War in the Town, with many others, and hearing the cries of France, France, perswaded his Comrades to fall upon their Keepers, and to kill them with their own weapons and this Prisoner that was taken at Montisel, was brought back again into France, as well for his known Valour, as for his Warlike deliverance, and since that made himself famous in Florida.

As for the Monument erected, makes me think he meaneth the Constable of France, who was taken Prisoner at the Battle of St. Quentin, and by the Monument, he[288] meaneth the Escurial, which Philip the II. caused to be built in memory of that Victory, which obliged Henry the II. to call back again in all hast the Duke of Guise with all his Forces, or else France had been in danger to be lost.

XXX.

French.

Le sac sapproche, feu, grand sang espandu,
Pau grand Fleuve, aux Bouviers l’entreprise,
De Genes, Nice apres long temps attendu,
Fossan, Thurin, a Savillan la prise.

English.

The plundering draws near, fire, abundance of blood spilt,
Pau a great River, an enterprise by Herdsmen,
Of Genes, Nice after they shall have staid long,
Fossan, Thurin, the prize shall be at Savillan.

ANNOT.

The plundering draweth near, here the Author speaketh of things that should happen in his days. He writ this the first of March 1555. and History mentioneth that from the first of March 1555. till the beginning of 1559. the plundering of Piemont in Italy was very great, since the taking of Cazal by the French, for there was nothing but continual fightings, taking and retaking Towns, Skirmishes and Battles, and most of them by the River Pau, the greatest of Italy. The rest of the second Verse, and the beginning of the third saith, that the undertaking of Genoa shall be by the Herdsmen, by whom he meaneth the Turks, who being called by the French to help them in the taking of Nice, made an action fit for Herdsmen and villanous Traitors, doing nothing, because they had been bribed by the Genoeses.

This was done after the French had stay’d long for this infidel, who endeavoured to delude the French, and take all for himself; and this is the meaning of, After Nice had stayed long. In the mean time the Spaniards increased their Victories, as the fourth Verse witnesseth to the taking of Fossan, Thurin, and Savillan.

Fossan is a Town of Piemont, which that it might be distinguished from Marseilles, which the Author often calleth Fossen or Phocen, he putteth in the Epithete of Thurin, to signifie he meaneth Fossan in Piemont.

He saith that Fossan of Piemont shall have the taking towards Savillan, that is, this Fossan which belongeth to the Spaniards, will take some Towns near Sivillan.

XXXI.

French.

De Languedoc, & Guienna plus de dix
Mille, voudront les Alpes repasser.
Grans Allobroges marcher contre Brundis,
Aquin & Bresse les viendront recasser.

English.

From Languedoc, and Guienna more then 10000.
Would be glad to come back over the Alpes.
Great Allobroges shall march against Brundis,
Aquin and Bresse shall beat them back.

[289]

ANNOT.

Languedoc and Guienne are two Provinces in France, from whence many Souldiers shall be raised to go into Italy, but being distressed, shall wish to come back again over the Alpes. By the great Allobroges, I understand those of Savoy and Piemont, who shall go against Brundis, in Latine Brundusium, but shall be beaten back by Aquin and Bresses, Cities belonging to the Venetians.

XXXII.

French.

Du Mont Royal naistra d’une Casane,
Qui Duc, & Compte viendra tyranniser,
Dresser Copie de la marche Millane,
Favence, Florence d’or & gens espuiser.

English.

Out of the Royal Mount shall be born in a Cottage,
One that shall tyranise over Duke and Earl,
He shall raise an Army in the Land of Millan,
He shall exhaust Favence and Florence of their gold.

ANNOT.

This needeth no Interpretation.

XXXIII.

French.

Par fraude Regne, forces expolier,
La classe obsesse, passages a l’espie,
Deux faincts amis se viendront r’allier,
Esueiller haine de long temps assoupie.

English.

By fraud a Kingdom and an Army shall be spoilt,
The Fleet shall be put to a strait, passages shall be made to the spies,
Two feigned friends shall agree together,
They shall raise up a hatred that had been long dormant.

ANNOT.

The words are plain.

XXXIV.

French.

En grand regret sera la gent Gauloise,
Cœur vain, leger croira temerité,
Pain, sel, ne vin eau venin ne cervoise,
Plus grand captif, faim, froid, necessité.
[290]

English.

In great regret shall the French Nation be.
Their vain and light heart shall believe rashly.
They shall have neither Bread, Salt, Wine, nor Beer,
Moreover they shall be Prisoners, and shall suffer hunger, cold, and need.

ANNOT.

The words are plain, and the onely question is whither this distress threatned here to France is past or to come.

XXXV.

French.

La grand poche viendra plaindre pleurer,
D’avoir esleu, trompez seront en l’Aage,
Guiere avec eux ne voudra demeurer,
Deceu sera par ceux de son langage.

English.

The great Pocket shall bewaile and bemoan,
For having Elected one, they shall be deceived in his Age,
He shall not stay long with them,
He shall be deceived by those of his own language.

ANNOT.

The great Pocket which is the Key of this Stanza being obscure, forceth me to leave the rest unperfect.

XXXVI.

French.

Dieu, le Ciel tout le Divin Verbe a l’Onde,
Porté par rouges sept razes a Bizance,
Contre les oingts trois cens de Trebisonde,
Deux Loix mettront, & horreur, puis credence.

English.

God, Heaven, all the Divine Word in water,
Carryed by red ones, seven shaved heads at Bisantium,
Against the anointed three hundred of Trebisond,
They shall put two Laws, and horror, and afterwards believe.

ANNOT.

This seemeth to foretel that the Sacrament according to the Roman Church, shall be carried by Cardinals and seven Priests to Constantinople, against which three hundred of Trebison shall dispute, who shall compare the two Laws with horror, and afterwards believe.

[291]

XXXVII.

French.

Dix envoyez, chef de nef mettre a mort,
D’un adverty, en classe guerre ouverte,
Confusion chef, l’un se picque & mord,
Leryn, Stecades nefs, cap dedans la nerte.

English.

Ten shall be sent to put the Captain of the Ship to death,
He shall have notice by one, the Fleet shall be in open War,
A confusion shall be amongst the Chief, one pricks and bites,
Leryn, Stecades nefs, caps dedans la nerte.

ANNOT.

The three first Verses are plain; as for the fourth I believe it to be the Language of the Antipodes, for I think no man can understand it.

XXXVIII.

French.

L’Aisné Roial sur coursier voltigeant,
Picquer viendra si rudement courir,
Gueule lipée, pied dans l’Estrein pleignant,
Traine, tiré, horriblement mourir.

English.

The eldest Royal prancing upon a Horse,
Shall spur, and run very fiercely
Open mouth, the foot in the Stirrup, complaining,
Drawn, pulled, die horribly.

ANNOT.

This foretelleth of the eldest Son of a King, who prancing upon his Horse, shall Spur and run so fiercely, that his foot being intangled in the Stirrup he shall be dragged and pulled, and die a fearful death.

In the year 1555. upon the 25 of May, this came to pass in the person of Henry of Albret, the second of that name, King of Navarre.

This Prince Henry II. the eldest Royal riding upon a horse did spur him so hard, that he ran away with him, so that he perceiving the danger he was in, pulled the Bridle so hard that the horse’s mouth was broken; the pain did not stop the horse, but contrariwise, he grew the more untoward, that Henry fell down, and in falling one of his feet hung in the stirrup, so that he was drawn, and died a horrid death. This I found in the History of Naples.

[292]

XXXIX.

French.

Le conducteur de l’Armée Francoise,
Cuidant perdre le principal Phalange,
Par sus pavé de l’Avaigne & Ardoise,
Soy parfondra par Gennes gent estrange.

English.

The leader of the French Army,
Thinking to rout the chiefest Phalange,
Upon the Pavement of Avaigne, and Slate,
Shall sink in the ground by Gennes, a strange Nation.

ANNOT.

It seemeth that a French General, thinking to rout and overcome the chiefest strength of his enemy, and going upon a brittle Pavement, made of Slate, shall sink in the ground not far from Genoa, which he calleth a strange Nation to the French.

XL.

French.

Dedans tonneaux hors oingts d’huile & graisse,
Seront vingt un devant le port fermez,
Au second guet feront par mort prouesses,
Gaigner les portes & du quet assommez.

English.

With Pipes annointed without with Oyl and Grease,
Before the harbour, one and twenty shall be shut,
At the second Watch, by death, they shall do great feats of Arms,
To win the Gates, and be killed by the Watch.

ANNOT.

The words and sense of this Stanza are plain.

XLI.

French.

Les os des pieds, & des mains enferrez,
Par bruit maison long temps inhabitée,
Seront par songes concavant deterrez,
Maison salubre & sans bruit habitée.
[293]

English.

The bones of the feet and of the hands in shackles,
By a noise a house shall be a long time deserted,
By a dream the buried shall be taken out of the ground,
The house shall be healthful, and inhabited without noise.

ANNOT.

I have found the truth of this Stanza upon the place, in my going to Lion, it was my fortune to lye at a Town four Leagues on this side of it, called Lapacodier, where this Story was told me to have happened few days before.

It chanced that a Company of Foot was to lie in the Town, and distressed for quarter, they enquired why such a house was empty, and were told it was not inhabited by reason of a noise heard there every night. The Captain of the Troop resolved, since he feared not the living, not to fear the dead, and thereupon lay in the house that night, where Beds were provided for him, and about half a Dozen of his stoutest Souldiers; so they laid down their weapons on the Table, and began to be merry at Cards and Dice, expecting the event. The door being fast locked, about twelve and one they heard as though some body knockt at the door, one of the Souldiers by the Captains command, with a Pistol in his hand, and a Candle, opened the door, then appeared to them a Phantasm, in the shape of an old man, loaded with Chains, that made a great noise, this Phantasm beckened to the Captain at the Table to come to him, the Captain also rising, beckened to the Phantasm to come to him, this lasted for a while, till the Captain resolved to go to him, and so taking a Candle in one hand, and a Pistol in the other, bid his Souldiers follow him hand in hand with their Arms, then taking the Phantasm by the hand, which was exceeding cold, he led them into the Cellar, and through many turnings, till at last the Phantasm vanished, and the Candles went out, then were they constrained to remain there till day light, when perceiving where they were, and having taken notice of the Place where the Phantasm left them, they went out, and related the story to the Townsmen; so afterwards they digged in that place, where they found a kind of a Trunk, and the bones of a man in it shackled, they buryed the body in a Church-yard, and no noise was heard afterwards in that house, this came to pass about 1624.

XLII.

French.

Quand Innocent tiendra le lieu de Pierre,
Le Nizaram Sicilian se verra,
En grands honneurs, mais apres il cherra,
Dans le bourbier d’une Civile guerre.

English.

When Innocent shall hold the place of Peter,
The Sicilian Nizaram shall see himself
In great honours, but after that he shall fall
Into the dirt of a Civil war.

[294]

ANNOT.

Nothing can be more plain and true than this Prophecie, and those that deny it, may also deny the light of the Sun, but to make it more evident, we will examine it Verse by Verse.

When Innocent shall hold the place of Peter; that is, when one named Innocent shall be Pope, as he was that preceded the last.

The Sicilian Nizaram shall see himself in great honours; that is, the Sicilian Nizarim, for Nizaram, is the Annagramme of Mazarin, letter for letter, who was born in Sicily, shall see himself in great honours, as he did; for he was then in his greatest splendor.

But after that he shall fall into the dirt of a Civil war; As every one knows he did, having put in Prison the Prince of Condé, the Prince of Conty, and the Duke of Congueiulle, can any thing be more plain, and yet when I read this forty years ago, I took it to be ridiculous.

XLIII.

French.

Lutece en Mars, Senateurs en credit,
Par une nuict Gaule sera troublée,
Du grand Cræsus l’Horoscope predit,
Par Saturnus, sa puissance exillée.

English.

Lutetia in Mars, Senators shall be in credit.
In a night France shall be troubled,
The Horoscope of the great Cræsus foretelleth,
That by Saturn his power shall be put down.

ANNOT.

Lutetia in Latine is the City of Paris, after the death of Henry IV. the Parliament of Paris began to prick up their ears, and to go about to call the great ones to account, amongst whom was the Marquess d’Ancre, favourite of the Queen Regent, that had gathered great riches, and therefore is called here Cræsus, our Author saith, that his power shall be put down by Saturnus, which must here be understood mistically, which proved true, for by the Kings command, then Lewis XIII. he was shot with three Pistols in the Louvre.

XLIV.

French.

Deux de poison saisis nouveaux Venus
Dans la cuisine du grand Prince verser,
Par le souillard tous deux au fait cogneus,
Prins qui cuidoit de mort l’aisné vexer.
[295]

English.

Two newly come being provided with poison,
To pour in the Kitchin of the great Prince,
By the Cooks Boy the fact shall be known,
And he taken, that thought by death to vex the elder.

ANNOT.

This came to pass in the time of Henry IV. who was poisoned at Melan, by two unknown men, who were discovered by the Cooks Boy in the doing of it, and were both taken, the History is at large in Peter Matthew his Historiographer, which I could not insert here for the satisfaction of the Reader; because I could not get the Book, the Reader may satisfie himself upon the place.

[296]

Other Stanzas, taken out of twelve, under the seventh Century, out of which eight have been rejected, because they were found in the foregoing Centuries.

LXXIII.

French.

Renfort de Sieges manubis & maniples,
Changez le sacre & passe sur le pronsne,
Prins & captifs n’arreste les prez triples,
Plus par fonds mis elevé, mis au Trosne.

English.

Recruit of Sieges, spoils and prizes,
Corpus Christi day shall be changed, and the pronsne slighted,
They shall be taken and made Prisoners, do not stay in the threefold Field,
Moreover, one put in the bottom shall be raised to the Throne.

LXXX.

French.

L’Occident libre les Isles Britanniques,
Le recogneu passer le bas, puis haut,
Ne content triste Rebel corss. Escotiques,
Puis rebeller par plui & par nuict chaut.

English.

The West shall be free, and the Brittish Islands,
The discovered shall pass low, then high,
Scottish Pirates shall be, who shall rebel,
In a rainy and hot night.

LXXXII.

French.

La stratageme simulte sera rare,
La Mort en voye rebelle par contrée,
Par le retour du voyage Barbare,
Exalteront la potestante entrée.

English.

The stratagem and grudge shall be scarce,
Death shall be in a rebellious way through the Countrey,
By the return from a Barbarian travel,
They shall exalt the Protestant entrance.

[297]

LXXXIII.

French.

Vent chaut, conseil, pleurs, timidité,
De nuict au lict assailly sans les Armes:
D’oppression grand calamité,
L’Epithalame converty pleurs & larmes.

English.

Hot wind, councel, tears, fearfulness,
He shall be assaulted in his bed by night without Arms,
From that oppression shall be raised a great calamity,
The Epithalamium shall be converted into tears.

ANNOT.

The reason why I have put no Annotations to these, as I have done to the rest, is, because according to my judgement, and that of the most Learned, they are spurious.


[298]

TO THE
READER.

Friendly Reader,

Before you Read the following Epistle, I would have you be warned of a few things: One is, that according to my opinion, it is very obscure and intelligible in most places, being without any just connection, and besides the obscurity of the sense, the crabbedness of the expression is such, that had not the importunity of the Bookseller prevailed, I would have left it out, but considering the respect due to Antiquity, the satisfaction we owe to curious persons, who would perhaps have thought the Book imperfect without it, we let it go, trusting to your Candor and Ingenuity.

Farewell.


[299]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY VIII. IX. & X.

That had not been Printed before, and are in the same Edition of 1568.

TO THE

Most Invincible, most High, and most Christian King of France HENRY the Second; Michael Nostradamus his most obedient Servant and Subject, wisheth Victory and Happiness.

By reason of that singular observation, I had O most Christian and Victorious King, since my Face, who had been cloudy a great while, did present it self before your immeasurable Majesty. I have been ever since perpetually dazled, continually honouring and worshipping that day, in which I presented my self before it, as before a singular humane Majesty; now seeking after some occasion, whereby I might make appear the goodness and sincerity of my heart, and extend my acquaintance towards your most Excellent Majesty; and seeing that it was impossible for me to declare it by effects, as well because of the darkness and obscurity of[300] my mind, as for the enlightning it did receive from the face of the greatest Monarch in the World; I was a great while before I could resolve to whom I should Dedicate these three last Centuries of my Prophecies, which make the compleat thousand, and after I had a long time considered, I have with a great temerity made my address to your Majesty, being no ways dainted by it, as the grave Author Plutarch related in the Life of Lycurgus, that seeing the offerings and gifts that were Sacrificed in the Temples of their Heathen Gods, durst not come thither no more, least the people should wonder at the costs and charges. Notwithstanding, seeing your Royal Splendour joyned with an incomparable Humanity, I have made my address to it, not as to the Kings of Persia, of whom to come near, it was forbidden, but to a most Prudent and Wise Prince I have Dedicated my Nocturnal and Prophetical Supputations, written rather by a natural instinct, and Poetical furour, then by any rules of Poetry; and most part of it written and agreeing with the Years, Months and Weeks, of the Regions, Countreys and most part of the Towns and Cities in Europe; touching also some thing of Africa, and of a part of Asia, by the change of Regions that come near to those Climats, and compounded of natural faction. But some body may answer (who hath need to blow his Nose) the Rime to be as easie to be understood, as the intelligence of the sence is hard and difficult, and therefore O most humane King, most of the Prophetical Stanza’s are so difficult, that there is no way to be found for the Interpretation of them; nevertheless being in hope of setting down the Towns, Cities, and Regions, wherein most of those shall happen, especially in the year 1585. and in the year 1606. beginning from this present time, which is the 14. of March 1557. and going further to the fulfilling of those things, which shall be in the beginning of the seventh Millenary, according as my Astronomical Calculation, and other Learning could reach, at which time the adversaries of Christ and of his Church shall begin to multiply; all hath been composed and calculated in days and hours of Election, and well disposed, and all as accurately as was possible for me to do. And the whole Minerva libera & non invita, Calculating almost as much of the time that is come, as of that which is past, comprehending it in the present time, and what by the course of the said time shall be known to happen in all Regions punctually as it is here written, adding nothing superfluous to it, although it be said; Quod de futuris contingentibus, non est determinata omnino veritas. It is very true Sir, that by[301] my natural instinct given me by my Progenitors, I did think I could foretel any thing; but having made an agreement between this said instinct of mine, and a long Calculation of Art, and by a great tranquility and repose of mind, emptied my Soul of all care and carefulness, I have foretold most part of these ex tripode æneo, though there be many who attribute to me some things that are no more mine, then what is nothing at all. The only Eternal God, who is the searcher of men’s hearts, being pious, just, and merciful, is the true Judge of it, whom I beseech to defend me from the calumny of the wicked men, who would as willing calumniously inquire for what reason all your ancient Progenitors Kings of France have healed the disease called the Kings-evil, and some other Nations have cured the biting of venomous Beasts; others have had a certain instinct to foretell things that are to come, and of several others, too tedious to be here inserted; notwithstanding those in whom the malignancy of the wicked spirit shall not be suppressed by length of time; after my decease my work shall be in more esteem, then when I was alive; nevertheless if I should fail in the supputation of times, or could not please some, may it please your most Imperial Majesty to forgive me, protesting before God and his Saints, that I do not intend to insert any thing by writing in this present Epistle, that may be contrary to the true Catholick Faith, in conferring the Astronomical Calculation, according to my learning; for the space of times of our Fathers that have been before us, are such, submitting my self to the correction of the most Learned, that the first man Adam was before Noah, about one thousand two hundred forty two years, not computing the time according to the supputation of the Gentiles, as Varro did, but onely according to the Sacred Scriptures, and the weakness of my wit in my Astronomical Calculations. After Noah and the universal Flood about a thousand and fourscore years came Abraham, who was a supreme Astrologer, according to most mens opinion, and did first invent the Chaldæan Letters; after that came Moses, viz. some five hundred and fifteen or sixteen years after, and between the time of David and Moses have passed about 570. years. After which between the time of David and that of our Saviour and Redeemer Jesus Christ, born of the Virgin Mary, have passed (according to some Chronographers) a thousand three hundred and fifty years. Some body may object, that this supputation is not true; because it differeth from that of Eusebius. And from the time of humane redemption, to that of the execrable seduction of the Saracens, have passed six[302] hundred and four and twenty years, or thereabouts. From that time hitherto, it is easie to collect what times are past, if my supputation be not good among all Nations; because all hath been calculated by the course of the Cœlestial bodies, joyned with motion, infused in me at certain loose hours, by the motion of my ancient Progenitors; but the injury of the time (most excellent King) requireth, that such secret events should not be manifested, but by an enigmatical Sentence, having the only sense, and one only intelligence, without having mixed with it any ambiguous or amphibological calculation, but rather under a Cloudy obscurity, through a natural infusion, coming near to the Sentence of one of the Thousand and two Prophets, that have been since the Creation of the World, according to the supputation and punical Chronick of Joel. Effundam spiritum meum super omnem, & carnem & prophetabunt filli vestri & filiæ vestræ: But such a Prophecy did proceed from the mouth of the Holy Ghost, who was the Supreme and eternal Power, which being come with that of the Cœlestial bodies, hath caused some of them to foretel great and wonderful things; as for my part I challenge no such thing in this place, God forbid, I confess truly, that all cometh from God, for which I give him thanks, honour, and praise, without having mixed any thing of that divination, which proceedeth a Fato, but only of that which proceedeth a Deo & Natura, and most of it joyned with the motion and course of the Cœlestial Bodies; insomuch that seeing as in a burning Glass, and through a Cloudy Vision, the great and sad events, the prodigious and calamitous accidents, that shall befall the Worshippers, first of God, and secondly, those that are Earthly propped up, with a thousand other calamitous accidents, which shall be known in course of time; for God will take notice of the long barrenness of the great Dame, who afterwards shall conceive two principal Children: But being in danger, she that shall be added to her by the temerity of age, running a danger in the 18, and not able to go beyond the 36, shall leave behind her three females, and he shall have two that never had any of the same father, the differences between the three Brothers shall be such, and then shall they be united and agreed, insomuch that the three and four parts of Europe shall quake: by the lesser in years shall the Christian Monarchy be upheld and augmented, Sects shall rise, and presently be put down again, the Arabians shall be put back, Kingdoms shall be united, and new Laws made. Concerning the other Children; the first shall possess the furious Crowned Lions, holding[303] their Paws upon the Escutcheons. The second, well attended, will go so deep among the Lions, that the second way shall be open, all trembling and furious going down, to get upon the Pyrenæan Mountains. The ancient Monarchy shall not be transferred, the third innundation of humane blood shall happen, and for a good while Mars shall not be in Lent. And the Daughter shall be given for the preservation of the Church, the Dominator of it falling into the Pagan Forces of the new unbelievers, she shall have two Children, one from faithfulness, and the other from unfaithfulness, for the confirmation of the Catholick Church; and the other, who to his confusion and late repentance, shall go about to ruine her. There shall be three Regions by the extreme differences of the leagues, viz. the Roman, the German, and the Spanish, who by a Military hand shall make divers Sects, forsaking the 50 and 52 degrees of altitude, and all those of remote Regions shall do homage to the Regions of Europe, and of the North of 40 Degrees Altitude, who by a vain fright shall quake, after that those of the West, South, and East shall quake because of their power, insomuch that what shall be done, cannot be undone by Warlike power. They shall be equal in Nature, but much different in Faith. After this, the barren Dame of a greater power then the second, shall be admitted by two people, by the first obstinate that had power over the others; by the second, and by the third, that shall extend his Circuit of the East of Europe, as far as the Hungarians, vanquished and overcome, and by a Maritine Sail, shall make his excursions into the Trinarrian and Adriatick Sea, by his Mirmidons, and Germany shall fall, and the Barbarian Sect shall be wholly driven from among the Latines. Then the great Empire of Antichrist shall begin in the Attila, and Xerxes to come down with an innumerable multitude of people, insomuch that the coming of the Holy Ghost, proceeding from the 48 Degree, shall transmigrate, driving away the abomination of the Antichrist, who made War against the Royal, who shall be the great Vicar of I. C. and against his Church, and his Kingdom, per tempus, & in occasione temporis, and before this shall precede a Solar Eclipse, the most dark and obscure that was since the Creation of the World, till the death and passion of I. C. and from him till then, and it shall be in the Month of October, when such a great Translation shall be made, that every body will think that the weight of the Earth, shall have lost its natural motion, and be swallowed up in perpetual darkness. In the Spring before and after this, shall happen extraordinary changes, mutations of Kingdoms, and great Earth-quakes, with pullulation[304] of the new Babylons miserable daughter, increased by the abomination of the first Holocaust, and shall last only 73 years and 7 Months, then from that Stock she that had been long time barren, proceeding from the fifth Degree, who shall renew all the Christian Church, and then shall be a great Peace, Union and Concord, between one of the Children of the wandring and seperated foreheads by divers Kingdoms, and such Peace shall be made, that the Instigator and Promoter of Military function, by diversity of Religions, shall be tied to the bottom of the deep, and the Kingdom of the Rabious, who shall counterfeit the wise, shall be united. And the Countreys, Towns, Cities and Provinces, that had deserted their first ways to free themselves, captivating themselves more deeply, shall be secretly angry at their liberty and Religion lost, and shall begin to strike from the left, to turn to the right, restoring the holiness beaten down long before with their former writing; so that after the great Dog, shall come forth the biggest Mastif, who shall destroy all that was done formerly, then Churches shall be built up again as before, the Clergy shall be restored to its former state, and shall begin to Whore, and Luxuriate, and to commit a Thousand Crimes. And being near unto another desolation, when she shall be in her higher and more sublime dignity, there shall rise powers and Military hands, who shall take away from her the two Swords, and leave her only the Ensigns, from which by the means of the crookedness that draweth them, the people causing it to go straight, and not willing to submit unto them by the end opposite to the sharp hand that toucheth the Ground, they shall provoke till that a branch shall proceed from the barren, which shall deliver the people of the World from that meek and voluntary slavery, putting themselves under the protection of Mars, depriving Jupiter of all his honours and dignities, for the free City established and seated in another little Mesopotamia. And the chief Governour shall be thrust out of the middle, and set in the high place of the Air, being ignorant of the conspiracy of the Conspirators, with the second Thrasibulus, who long before did manage this thing, then shall the impurities and abominations be objected with great shame, and made manifest to the darknes of the darkened light, and shall cease towards the end of the change of his Kingdom, the chief men of the Church shall be put back from the love of God, and many of them shall apostatise from the true faith, and from the true Sects, the middlemost of which by her worshippers,[305] be a little put into ruine; the first, wholly in all Europe, and most part of Africa undone by the third, by the means of the poor in Spirit, who by madness elevated, shall through libidinous luxury, commit adultery. The people will rise and maintain it, and shall drive away those that did adhere to the Legislators, and shall seem by the Kingdoms spoiled by the Eastern men, that God the Creator hath loosed Satan from his Infernal Prison, to cause to be born the great Dog and Doham, who shall make so great and abominable a fraction in the Churches, that the Red nor the White, without Eyes and without Hands, shall not judge of it, and their power shall be taken away from them. Then shall be a greater persecution against the Church than ever was, and in the mean time shall be so great a Plague, that two parts of three in the world shall fail, insomuch that no body shall be able to know the true owners of fields and houses, and there shall happen a total desolation unto the Clergy, and the Martial men shall usurpe what shall come back from the City of the Sun, and from Molita, and the Stæchades Islands, and the great Chain of that Port shall be open, which taketh its denomination from a Sea Oxe, and a new incursion shall be made through the Sea Coasts, willing to deliver the Castulan Leap from the first Mahometan taking, and the assaulting shall not altogether be in vain, and that place where the habitation of Abraham was, shall be assaulted by those, who shall have a respect for the Jovials. And that City of Achem, shall be encompassed and assaulted on all sides, by a great power of Armed men; their Sea Forces shall be weakened by the Western men, and to that Kingdom shall happen great desolation, and the great Cities shall be depopulated, and those that shall come in, shall be comprehended within the vengeance of the wrath of God, and the Sepulchre held in so great veneration, shall remain a great while open to the universal Aspect of the Heavens, Sun and Moon, and the sacred place shall be converted into a Stable for small and great Cattle, and put to prophane uses. O what a calamitous affliction shall be then for women with Child, and chiefly by the principal Easterly head, being for the most part moved by the Northern and Westerly men, vanquished and put to death, beaten, and all the rest put to flight, and the Children he had by many women, put in Prison, then shall be fulfilled the Prophecy of the Kingly Prophet. Ut audiret gemitus compeditorum, ut solveret filios interemptorum, what great oppression shall be made then upon the Princes and Governours of Kingdoms, and especially of those that[306] shall live Eastward and near the Sea, and their Languages inter-mixed very sociably. The Language of the Arabians and Latines by the African communication, and all the Eastern Kings shall be driven away, beaten and brought to nothing, not altogether by the means of the strength of the Kings of the North, and by the drawing near of our age, by the means of three secretly united, seeking for death by ambushes one against another. And the renewing of the Triumvirate shall last seven years, while the fame of such a sect shall be spread all the world over, and the Sacrifice of the Holy and immaculate Host shall be upheld: And then shall the Lords be two in number victorious in the North against the Eastern ones, and there shall be such a great noise and Warlike tumult, that all the East shall quake for fear of those two Brothers, not Northern Brothers. And because, Sir, by this discourse, I put all things confusedly in these predictions, as well concerning the event of them, as for the account of the time which followeth, which is not at all, or very little conformable to that I have done before, as well by Astronomical way, as other of the sacred Scriptures which cannot erre, I could have set down to every quatrain the time in which they shall happen, but it would not please every body, much less the interpretation of them, till, Sir, your Majesty hath granted me full power so to do, that my Calumniators may have nothing to say against me. Nevertheless reckoning the years since the Creation of the World to the Birth of Noah have passed 1506. years, and from the Birth of Noah to the perfect building of the Ark near the universal Flood have passed 600. years, whither solary, or lunary, or mixed, for my part according to the Scriptures, I hold that they were solary. And at the end of those 600. years Noah entered into the Ark, to save himself from the Flood, which Flood was universal upon the Earth, and lasted a year and two months; and from the end of the Flood, to the birth of Abraham did pass the number of 295. years; and from the birth of Abraham to that of Isaac did pass 100. years, and from Isaac to Jacob 60. years; and from the time that he went into Ægypt till he came out of it, did pass 130. years; and from the time that Jacob went into Ægypt till his posterity came out of it did pass 430. years; and from the coming out of Ægypt to the building of Salomon’s Temple in the fourth year of his Reign did pass 480. years; and from the building of the Temple till Jesus Christ, according to the supputation of the Chronographers, did pass 490. years; and so by this supputation, which I have gathered out of the Holy[307] Scriptures, the whole cometh to about 4173. years, eight Months more or less. But since the time of I. C. hitherto, I leave it because of the diversity of Opinions. And having calculated these present Prophecies according to the order of the Chain, which containeth the revolution, and all by Astronomical Doctrine, and according to my natural instinct, and after some time, and in it comprehending since the time that Saturn shall turn to come in on the 7 of the Month of April, till the 25 of August; Jupiter from the 14 of June to the 7 of October; Mars from the 27 of April till 22 of June; Venus from the 9 of April to the 22 of May; Mercury from the 3 of February till the 24 of the same; afterwards from the 1 of June till the 24 of the same; and from the 25 of September till the 16 of October, Saturn in Capricorn, Jupiter in Aquarius, Mars in Scorpio, Venus in Pisces, Mercury within a Month in Capricorn, Aquarius in Pisces, Luna in Aquarius, the Dragons head in Libra, the Tail opposite to her sign according to a Conjunction of Jupiter and Mercury, with a quadrin Aspect of Mars to Mercury, and the head of the Dragon shall be with a Conjunction of Sol and Jupiter: the year shall be peacefull without Eclipse, and in the beginning of that year shall be a greater persecution against the Christian Church than ever was in Affrica, and it shall last till the year 1792. at which time every body will think it a renovation of Age. After that the Roman people shall begin to stand upright again, and to put away some obscure darknesses, receiving some of its former light, but not without great divisions, and continual changes. Venice after that with great strength and power shall lift up her Wings so high, that she will not be much inferiour to the strength of the old Rome, and in that time great Bizantine Sails, joyned with the Ligustiques, by the Northern help and power shall give some hinderance, whereby those of Crete shall not keep their faith, the Arches built by the antient Martial men, will keep company together with Neptun’s Waves. In the Adriatick shall be a great discord, what was united shall be parted asunder, and what was before, and is a great City, will go near to becom a house, including the Pempotan, and the Mesopotamia of Europe to 45, and others to 41, 42, and 37. And in that time, and Countrey, the Infernal power shall rise against the Church of I. C. with the power of the Enemies to his Law, which shall be the second Antechrist, who shall persecute the said Church and its Vicar by the means of the power of Temporal Kings, who through their Ignorance shall be seduced by Tongues more sharp than any Sword in the hands of a mad man.[308] The said Reign of Antichrist shall not last but till the ending of him, born by Age, and of the other in the City of Plancus, accompanied by the Elect of Modone, Fulcy by Ferrara, maintained by Adriatick, Liguriens, and the proximity of the great Trinacria, and after that shall pass over the Mount Jovis. The Gallique Ogmyon followed with such a number, that even from afar off the Empire of the great Law, shall be presented to him, and then, and after shall be profusedly spilled the blood of the Innocent by the Nocent, raised on high; then by great Floods the memory of those things contained by such Instruments, shall receive an innumerable loss, as also shall learning towards the North by the Divine Will, Satan bound once more, and an universal Peace shall be among men, and the Church of I. C. shall be free from all tribulation, although the Azosrains would fain mix among it the Honey of their pestilent seduction, and this shall happen about the seventh Millinary; so that the Sanctuary of I. C. shall be no more trodden down by the unbelievers that shall come from the North, the world being near to some conflagration, although by my supputations in my Prophecies, the course of the time goeth much further. In the Epistle that within the late years I have dedicated to my Son Cæsar Nostradamus, I have openly enough declared some things, without prognosticating. But here (Sir) are comprehended many great and wonderful events, which those that come after us shall see. And during the said Astrological supputation, conferred with the sacred Scripture, the persecution of the Clergy shall have its beginning from the power of Northern Kings, joyned with the Eastern ones; that persecution shall last Eleven years and a little less, at which time the chief Northern King shall fail, which years being ended, shall come in his united Southern one, who shall yet more violently persecute the Clergy by the Apostatical seduction of one that shall have the absolute power over the Militant Church of God: And the Holy people of God and keeper of his Law, and all order of Religion shall be grievously persecuted and afflicted, insomuch that the blood of the true Ecclesiastical men shall float all over, and unto one of those horrid Kings this praise shall be given by his followers to have spilt more humane blood of the Innocent Clergymen, than any body can do Wine, and the said King shall commit incredible crimes against the Church; humane blood shall run through publick streets and Churches, as water coming from an impetuous Rain, and the next Rivers shall be red with blood, and by another Sea fight the Sea shall be red, insomuch that one King shall[309] say to another, Bellis rubuit navalibus æquor. After that in the same year, & those that follow, shall happen the most horrid Plague, caused by the precedent famine, and so great tribulations as ever did happen since the first foundation of the Christian Church through all the Latine Regions; some marks of it remaining in some Countreys of Spain. At that time the Northern King hearing the complaint of the people of his principal title, shall raise up so great an Army, and shall go through the straights of his last Ancestors and Progenitors, that he will set up all again in their first state, and the great Vicar of the Cope, shall be restored in his former estate, but desolate and altogether forsaken, and then shall the Sancta sanctorum be destroyed by Paganism, and the old and New Testament be thrust out and burnt, after that shall Antechrist be the infernal Prince, and once more for the last all the Kingdoms of Christendom and also of the unbelievers shall quake for the space of 25 years, and there shall be more grievous Wars and Battles, and Towns, Cities, Castles and other buildings shall be burnt, desolate, and destroyed with a great effusion of Vestal blood, Married Women and Widows ravished, sucking Children dashed against the Walls of the Towns, and so many evils shall be committed by the means of the Infernal prince Satan, that almost the universal world shall be undone and desolate, and before these events many unusual Birds shall cry through the Air, Huy, Huy, and a little while after shall vanish away: And after that time shall have lasted a good while, there shall be renewed a Kingdom of Saturn and Golden Age. God the Creator shall say, hearing the affliction of his people, Satan shall be put, and tied in the bottom of the deep, and there shall begin an universal peace between God and men, and the Ecclesiastical power shall be in its greater force, and Satan shall be left bound for the space of a thousand years, and then shall be loosed again. All these Figures are justly fitted by the sacred Scripture, to the visible Cœlestial things, viz. Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars, and others joyned with them, as more at large may be seen in some of my Stanza’s. I would have calculated it more deeply, and compared one with the other, but seeing (most excellent King) that some stand ready to censure me, I shall withdraw my Pen to its Nocturnal repose. Multa etiam O Rex potentissime præclara, & sane in brevi ventura, sed omnia in hac tua Epistola innectere non possumus, nec volumus, sed ad intelligenda quedam facta, horrida fata pauca libanda sunt, quamvis tanta sit in omnes tua amplitudo & humanitas homines, deosque pietas, ut solus amplissimo & Christianissimo[310] regis nomine, & ad quem summa totius Religionis authoritas deferatur, dignus esse videare. But only I shall beseech you O most Merciful King, through your singular and prudent goodness, to understand rather the desire of my Heart, and the earnest desire I have to obey your most excellent Majesty, since my Eyes were so near your Royal Splendor, than the greatness of my work can deserve or require.

From Selin this 27 June, 1558.

Faciebat Michael Nostradamus,
Salonæ Petreæ, Provinciæ.


[311]

THE
PROPHECIES
OF
Michael Nostradamus.

CENTURY VIII.

I.

French.

Pau, Nay, Loron, plus feu qu’a sang sera,
Laude nager, fuir grands aux Surrez,
Les Agassas entrée refusera,
Pampon, Durance, les tiendront enserrez.

English.

Pau, Nay, Loron, more in fire then blood shall be,
Lauda to swim, great ones run to the Surrez,
The Agassas shall refuse the entry,
Pampon, Durance shall keep them enclosed.

ANNOT.

The Prophecies of this, and of the remaining Centuries being for the most part so obscure, as no man is able to make any sense of them, the judicious Reader must not expect from me, what no man else can do; let him suffice if I give him as much light as I can, and leave the rest to his own judgement and industry.

Pau is the chief Town of the Province of Bearn, in the Kingdom of Navarre, where Henry the IV. King of France and Navarre was born. Nay and Loron are barbarous words, so are Surrez, Agassas and Pampon. Durance is a River of France.

[312]

II.

French.

Condon & Aux, & autour de Mirande,
Je voy du Ciel feu qui les environne,
Sol, Mars, conjoint au Lion, puis Marmande,
Foudre, grand guerre, mur tomber dans Garonne.

English.

Condon and Aux, and about Mirande,
I see a fire from Heaven that encompasseth them,
Sol, Mars, in conjunction with the Lion, and then Marmande,
Lightning, great War, Wall falls into the Garonne.

ANNOT.

Condon, Aux, Mirande, and Marmande are Towns in the Province of Guyenne and Languedoc, Garonne is the River of Bourdeaux.

III.

French.

Au fort Chasteau de Vigilanne & Resviers,
Sera serré les puisnay de Nancy,
Dedans Turin seront ards les premiers,
Lors que de dueil Lyon sera transy.

English.

In the strong Castle of Vigilanne and Resviers,
Shall be kept close the youngest son of Nancy,
Within Turin the first shall be burnt up,
When Lyon shall be overwhelmed with sorrow.

ANNOT.

Vigilanne and Resviere being falsly writen here, it must be set down Veillane and Riuiere, which are two strong Castles, the first being seated in Piemont, and the last in Burgundy.

Nancy is the chief Town of Lorrain, and Turin of Piemont, Lyon is a famous City in France, so that the sense of this Prophecy seemeth to be, that the youngest Son of Nancy, (that is of Lorrain) shall be kept close Prisoner in those two Castles of Veillane and Riuiera, and that the chief men of Turin shall be burnt, when the City of Lyon shall be oppressed with sorrow.

IV.

French.

Dedans Monech le Coq sera receu,
Le Cardinal de France apparoistra,
Par Logarion Romain sera deceu,
Foiblesse a l’Aigle, & force au Coq croistra.
[313]

English.

Within Monech the Cock shall be admitted,
The Cardinal of France shall appear,
By Logarion, Roman shall be deceived,
Weakness to the Eagle, and strength to the Cock shall grow.

ANNOT.

Monech is false written here, it must be Monaco, which is a Principality and Town in Italy by Genoa, belonging to the House of the Grimaldi, wherein the French were admitted by the policy of Cardinal Richelieu, during the Wars between France and Spain.

Logarion is a Barbarous name, by which he meaneth some body unknown to us.

By the Eagle is meant the Emperour, who was very low at that time, and by the Cock, the King of France, who was very powerful, where it is to be observed, that by the Eagle the Emperour is always understood, because it is his Arms, and by the Cock is meant the King of France, because a Frenchman is called in Latine Galius, which also signifieth a Cock.

V.

French.

Apparoistra Temple luisant orné,
La Lampe & Cierge a Borne & Bretueil,
Pour la Lucerne le Canton destourné,
Quand on verra le grand Coq au Cercueil.

English.

A shining adorned Temple shall appear,
The Lamp and wax Candle at Borne and Bretueil,
For Lucerne the Canton turned of,
When the great Cock shall be seen in his Coffin.

ANNOT.

Borne and Bretueil are two particular places, the first is one of the four Baronies of the River Mase, viz. Petersem, Steen, Horne, Borne, the other is a little Town in Britany.

Lucerne is one of the Cantons of Switzerland. We have said before what is meant by the great Cock, viz. the King of France. Let the Reader make up the rest, according to his fancy.

VI.

French.

Charté fulgure a Lyon apparente,
Luysant, print Malte, subit sera estainte,
Sardon, Mauris traitera decevante,
Geneve a Londres, a Coq trahison feinte.
[314]

English.

A thundering light at Lyons appearing,
Bright, took Maltha, instantly shall be put out,
Sardon shall treat Mauris deceitfully,
To Geneva, London, and the Cock a fained treason.

ANNOT.

Maltha is an Island in the Mediterranean Sea, famous for the Knights that inhabit it, and take their name from thence. Sardon and Mauris are barbarous words.

VII.

French.

Verceil, Milan donra intelligence,
Dedans Tycin sera faite la paye,
Courir par Seine eau, sang, feu par Florence,
Unique choir d’hault en bas faisant maye.

English.

Verceil, Milan shall give intelligence,
In the Tycin shall the Peace be made,
Run through Seine water, blood, fire through Florence,
The only one shall fall from top to bottom making maye.

ANNOT.

Verceil and Milan are two Cities in Italy, the Tycin, or rather Thesin is a River of the same Countrey; Seine is the River that runneth at Paris. Florence is a famous City in Italy, and maye a barbarous word, foisted up to patch up his Rime.

VIII.

French.

Pres de Linterne dans des tonnes fermez,
Chivas fera pour l’Aigle la menée,
L’Esleu cassé, luy ses ges enfermez,
Dedans Turin rapt espouse emmenée.

English.

Near Linterne, enclosed within Tuns,
Chivas shall drive the plot for the Eagle,
The Elect cashiered, he and his men shut up,
Within Turin, a rape, and Bride carried away.

ANNOT.

Linterne is a small Town in Italy; by Tuns are meant woodden Vessels, such as they put Rhenish wines and others in.

Chivas is a Town in Piemont, and Turin the chief Town of the said Countrey.

[315]

IX.

French.

Pendant que l’Aigle & le Coq a Savone,
Seront unis, Mer, Levant & Hongrie,
L’Armée a Naples, Palerme, Marque d’Ancone,
Rome, Venise, par barbe horrible crie.

English.

Whilst the Eagle and the Cock at Savona,
Shall be united, Sea, Levant, and Hungary,
Army at Naples, Palermo, Mark of Ancona,
Rome, Venice, cry because of a horrid beard.

ANNOT.

By the Eagle is meant the Emperour, and by the Cock the King of France; the rest is easie.

X.

French.

Puanteur grande sortira de Lausane,
Qu’on ne scaura l’origine du fait,
L’on mettra hors toute la gent loingtaine,
Feu veu au Ciel peuple estranger deffait.

English.

A great stink shall come forth out of Lausane,
So that no body shall know the ofspring of it,
They shall put out all the Forreiners,
Fire seen in Heaven, a strange people defeated.

ANNOT.

Lausane is a City situated in Savoy, by the Lake of Geneva, but now as I take it in the possession of the Switzers.

XI.

French.

Peuple infiny paroistre a Vicence,
Sans force feu brusler la Basilique,
Pres de Lunage des fait grand de Valence,
Lors que Venise par morte prendre pique.

English.

Infinite deal of people shall appear at Vicence,
Without force, fire shall burn in the Basilick,
Near Lunage the great one of Valence shall be defeated,
When Venice by death shall take the pique.

[316]

ANNOT.

Vicenza is a Town in Italy, under the dominion of the Venetians. Basilick is the name of the biggest sort of Canons or pieces of Ordinance. As for Valence there is three Cities of that name, one in Spain, the second in France, and the third in Italy; instead of Lunage, it must be Lignago which is a Town in Italy.

XII.

French.

Apparoistra aupres du Bufalore,
L’haut & procere entré dedans Milan,
L’Abbé de Foix avec ceux de Saint Maure,
Feront la fourbe habillez en vilain.

English.

Near the Bufalore shall appear,
The high and tall, come into Milan,
The Abbot of Foix with those of Saint Maure,
Shall make the trumpery being cloathed like rogues.

ANNOT.

Bufalore is a barbarous word; Foix is a Countrey in France, and St. Maure a little Town in the said Countrey.

XIII.

French.

Le croisé Frere par amour effrenée,
Fera par Praytus Bellerophon mourir,
Classe a mil ans, la femme forcenée,
Beu le breueage, tous deux apres perir.

English.

The crossed Brother through unbridled love,
Shall cause Bellerophon to be killed by Praytus,
Fleet to thousand years, the woman out of her wit,
The drink being drunk, both after that, perish.

ANNOT.

Bellerophon and Praytus are two supposed and fictitious names.

XIV.

French.

Le grand credit, d’or, d’argent l’abundance,
Aveuglera par Libide l’honneur,
Cogneu sera d’adultere l’offence,
Qui parviendra a son grand deshonneur.
[317]

English.

The great credit, the abundance of Gold and Silver
Shall blind honour by lust,
The offence of the Adulterer shall be known,
Which shall come to his great dishonour.

ANNOT.

This is easie to be understood; for it is frequently seen, that Honour is made blind by lust, and chiefly if that lust be propped up with credit; and abundance of Gold and Silver.

XV.

French.

Vers Aquilon grands efforts par hommasse,
Presque l’Europe, l’Univers vexer,
Les deux Eclipses mettra en telle chassé,
Et aux Pannons vie & mort renforcer.

English.

Towards the North great endeavours by a manly woman,
To trouble Europe, and almost all the world,
She shall put to flight the two Eclipses,
And shall re-inforce life and death to the Pannons.

ANNOT.

By the Pannons is meant the Hungarians. The rest is easie.

XVI.

French.

Au lieu que Hieson fit sa nef fabriquer,
Si grand Deluge sera & si subite,
Qu’on n’aura lieu ne Terre sattaquer,
L’onde monter Fesulan Olympique.

English.

In the place where Jason caused his Ship to be built,
So great a Flood shall be, and so sudden,
That there shall be neither place nor Land to save themselves,
The Waves shall climb upon the Olympick Fesulan.

ANNOT.

Jason was Son to King Æson, who built a Ship called Argos, in which he went to Colchos, to Conquer the Golden Fleece.

Fesulan here is to be understood of some high and eminent place, which therefore he calleth Olympick, from Olympus a high Mountain in Grecia. The place where Jason builded his Ship.

[318]

XVII.

French.

Les bien aisez subit seront desmis,
Le monde mis par les trois freres en trouble,
Cité Marine saisiront ennemis,
Faim, feu, sang, peste, & de tous maux le double.

English.

Those that were at ease shall be put down,
The world shall be put in trouble by three Brothers,
The Maritine City shall be seized by its enemies,
Hunger, fire, blood, plague, and the double of all evils.

ANNOT.

It is not easie to tell what them three Brothers have been, or shall be, nor that Maritine or Sea City, therefore we leave it to the liberty of every ones judgement, the words being plain enough.

XVIII.

French.

De Flore issue de sa mort sera cause,
Un temps devant par jeusne & vieille bueyre,
Car les trois lis luy feront telle pause,
Par son fruit sauve comme chair crüe mueyre.

English.

Issued from Flora shall be the cause of her own death,
One time before, through fasting and old drink,
For the three Lillies shall make her such a pause,
Saved by her fruit, as raw flesh dead.

ANNOT.

This is one of those, wherein the Author would not be understood, and may be did not understand himself.

XVIX.

French.

A soustenir la grand cappe troublée,
Pour l’esclaireir les rouges marcheront,
De mort famille sera presqu’accablée,
Les rouges rouges, le rouge assommeront.

English.

To maintain up the great troubled Cloak,
The red ones shall march for to clear it,
A family shall be almost crushed to death,
The red, the red, shall knock down the red one.

[319]

ANNOT.

This seemeth to carry no other sense than a conspiracy of the Cardinals, called here by the name of the Red, the Red against the Pope, who is called the Red one.

XX.

French.

Le faux message par election feinte,
Courir par Urbem rompue pache arreste,
Voix acheptées de sang chappelle teinte,
Et a un autre qui l’Empire conteste.

English.

The contract broken, stoppeth the message,
From going about the Town, by a fained election,
Voices shall be bought, and a Chappel died with blood,
By another, who challengeth the Empire.

ANNOT.

This was so falsely printed, and so preposterously set in order, that I had much ado to pick out this little sense of it, which amounteth to no more, than that by reason of an agreement broken, the Messenger, that went to publish a faigned election (it seemeth of the Empire) shall be hindred, and that one of the Competitors to the said Empire, shall be killed in or near a Chappel, that shall be soiled by his Blood.

XXI.

French.

Au port de Agde trois fustes entreront,
Portant infection avec soy, pestilence,
Passant le pont mil milles embleront,
Et le pont rompre a tierce resistance.

English.

T